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Re: Hi,I.am.a.Newbie:)

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  • dzent1
    Hi Karen! Welcome to the Yurt community. They are wonderful dwellings and I hope you are able to get one that suits you. Some of the people on this site are
    Message 1 of 4 , Oct 1, 2008
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      Hi Karen! Welcome to the Yurt community. They are wonderful dwellings
      and I hope you are able to get one that suits you. Some of the people
      on this site are yurt manufacturers, some are just folks who decided
      to build their own from scratch (it's not difficult). You will also
      find that activity on this board comes in a trickle or a rush, as new
      people discover how beautiful yurts (also called "ger") are.

      However, I've noticed that some of the guys who were "old faithfuls"
      early on are kind of burnt out answering what must be "the same old
      questions" again and again. Can't blame them - but the truth is, their
      expertise is really valuable to beginners in the craft of yurt-building.

      There are some good do-it-yourself pictures and videos for making your
      own on the Instructables site that really lay out the basics. The
      thing to remember is that there is no one "correct" way because the
      very nature of the structure is forgiving and tolerant of materials
      and methods (see the Alaskan Ger Lady on the Instructables site to see
      what I mean)

      There are also really clear building instructions in some pdf's on the
      net. Here's a web document I like for it's simple, clear directions:
      http://www.pbm.com/~lindahl/articles/yurt/

      Other good sites:
      http://homepage.mac.com/decthree/Menu11.html
      http://www.yurts.com/what/virtual-build.aspx#
      http://www.backwoodshome.com/articles2/wolfe76.html
      http://www.yurtinfo.org/yurtplans.php
      http://www.woodlandyurts.co.uk/Yurt_Facts/Build_your_own_yurt.pdf
      http://www.rdrop.com/~glacier/yurt.htm
      http://simplydifferently.org/Yurt_Notes
      http://www.cco.net/~str8jkt/yurt.html
      http://www.rainieryurts.com/faq.html
      http://www.aroundtheyurt.com/Resource/Plans.aspx

      AND there are a lot of nice video clips on youtube, just search for
      "yurt" there. These links should be enough to get you started, and I
      hope you remember to enjoy the process and not stress too much about
      the "perfection" factor. Learn about the basics until you have a good
      picture in your head of what you want, then build or buy that!

      If you are physically incapable yourself, perhaps you have a friend
      handy with the very basic tools needed to cut wood to the desired
      specs. I cut all my yurt pieces on a $69 table saw; used 2"x4"x8'
      lumber available at any Home Depot, Loews or lumber yard.

      Roof can be a round swimming pool cover from ebay ($40 - $120
      depending on warranty/material). Sides can be anything from cheap
      tarps to heavy-duty vinyl. Some people, including modern-day Mongols,
      even use Tyvek, an inexpensive waterproof membrane used to vapor-wrap
      conventional houses. Or you can waterproof your own canvas using
      silicone caulk mixed with paint thinner (the thinner evaporates
      leaving the silicone in the fabric - roll it on with a paint roller).

      For insulation against summer heat or winter chill, the best and
      lightest method I've seen is called "Reflectix" brand insulation, also
      available at any Home Depot or Loews. It is often used for those car
      windshield covers to reflect the heat of the sun and apparently works
      great in a yurt, about an R19 insulation value.

      Other options include old wool army blankets, loose insulation sewn
      into canvas covers, bubble wrap - the idea is to trap air between the
      exterior cover and the inner liner of the yurt.

      Floors are anything from elaborate decks to simply plopping it on the
      ground with a tarp inside. It all depends on what you're going to use
      the yurt for. I'll be living full-time in mine so I'll probably put
      together a very basic round deck. I won't have a lot of weight inside
      (and the yurt itself certainly isn't real heavy) so I won't over-build
      it. When it doubt - use the KISS method (Keep It Simple, Silly).

      Anyway - start looking thru some of those links I mentioned and also,
      if you can afford it, get Becky Kemery's book "Yurts: Living In The
      Round". Here's her website: http://www.livingintheround.net/

      All the best and please feel free to contact me if you don't
      understand anything. Yurts are Sacred Geometry, and are a gift from
      the One who created us all.
    • Teri Pittman
      Let me add a link to my yurt bookmarks too: http://delicious.com/teri.pittman/yurts -- Teri Pittman teri.pittman@gmail.com
      Message 2 of 4 , Oct 1, 2008
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        Let me add a link to my yurt bookmarks too:
        http://delicious.com/teri.pittman/yurts


        --
        Teri Pittman
        teri.pittman@...
      • Kenneth
        LOL not burnt out on answers, just most of this is in older postings and I saw no reason to say it again.   ken ... From: dzent1
        Message 3 of 4 , Oct 1, 2008
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          LOL not burnt out on answers, just most of this is in older postings and I saw no reason to say it again.
           
          ken


          --- On Wed, 10/1/08, dzent1 <dzent1@...> wrote:
          From: dzent1 <dzent1@...>
          Subject: [The_Yurt_Community] Re: Hi,I.am.a.Newbie:)
          To: The_Yurt_Community@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Wednesday, October 1, 2008, 2:14 PM

          Hi Karen! Welcome to the Yurt community. They are wonderful dwellings
          and I hope you are able to get one that suits you. Some of the people
          on this site are yurt manufacturers, some are just folks who decided
          to build their own from scratch (it's not difficult). You will also
          find that activity on this board comes in a trickle or a rush, as new
          people discover how beautiful yurts (also called "ger") are.

          However, I've noticed that some of the guys who were "old faithfuls"
          early on are kind of burnt out answering what must be "the same old
          questions" again and again. Can't blame them - but the truth is, their
          expertise is really valuable to beginners in the craft of yurt-building.

          There are some good do-it-yourself pictures and videos for making your
          own on the Instructables site that really lay out the basics. The
          thing to remember is that there is no one "correct" way because the
          very nature of the structure is forgiving and tolerant of materials
          and methods (see the Alaskan Ger Lady on the Instructables site to see
          what I mean)

          There are also really clear building instructions in some pdf's on the
          net. Here's a web document I like for it's simple, clear directions:
          http://www.pbm. com/~lindahl/ articles/ yurt/

          Other good sites:
          http://homepage. mac.com/decthree /Menu11.html
          http://www.yurts. com/what/ virtual-build. aspx#
          http://www.backwood shome.com/ articles2/ wolfe76.html
          http://www.yurtinfo .org/yurtplans. php
          http://www.woodland yurts.co. uk/Yurt_Facts/ Build_your_ own_yurt. pdf
          http://www.rdrop. com/~glacier/ yurt.htm
          http://simplydiffer ently.org/ Yurt_Notes
          http://www.cco. net/~str8jkt/ yurt.html
          http://www.rainiery urts.com/ faq.html
          http://www.aroundth eyurt.com/ Resource/ Plans.aspx

          AND there are a lot of nice video clips on youtube, just search for
          "yurt" there. These links should be enough to get you started, and I
          hope you remember to enjoy the process and not stress too much about
          the "perfection" factor. Learn about the basics until you have a good
          picture in your head of what you want, then build or buy that!

          If you are physically incapable yourself, perhaps you have a friend
          handy with the very basic tools needed to cut wood to the desired
          specs. I cut all my yurt pieces on a $69 table saw; used 2"x4"x8'
          lumber available at any Home Depot, Loews or lumber yard.

          Roof can be a round swimming pool cover from ebay ($40 - $120
          depending on warranty/material) . Sides can be anything from cheap
          tarps to heavy-duty vinyl. Some people, including modern-day Mongols,
          even use Tyvek, an inexpensive waterproof membrane used to vapor-wrap
          conventional houses. Or you can waterproof your own canvas using
          silicone caulk mixed with paint thinner (the thinner evaporates
          leaving the silicone in the fabric - roll it on with a paint roller).

          For insulation against summer heat or winter chill, the best and
          lightest method I've seen is called "Reflectix" brand insulation, also
          available at any Home Depot or Loews. It is often used for those car
          windshield covers to reflect the heat of the sun and apparently works
          great in a yurt, about an R19 insulation value.

          Other options include old wool army blankets, loose insulation sewn
          into canvas covers, bubble wrap - the idea is to trap air between the
          exterior cover and the inner liner of the yurt.

          Floors are anything from elaborate decks to simply plopping it on the
          ground with a tarp inside. It all depends on what you're going to use
          the yurt for. I'll be living full-time in mine so I'll probably put
          together a very basic round deck. I won't have a lot of weight inside
          (and the yurt itself certainly isn't real heavy) so I won't over-build
          it. When it doubt - use the KISS method (Keep It Simple, Silly).

          Anyway - start looking thru some of those links I mentioned and also,
          if you can afford it, get Becky Kemery's book "Yurts: Living In The
          Round". Here's her website: http://www.livingin theround. net/

          All the best and please feel free to contact me if you don't
          understand anything. Yurts are Sacred Geometry, and are a gift from
          the One who created us all.


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