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Introduction

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  • yurtlife
    Hello everyone! I found this group several weeks ago, and have been reading posts, but have not had an opportunity to sit down and write an introduction until
    Message 1 of 13 , Mar 3, 2005
      Hello everyone!
      I found this group several weeks ago, and have been reading posts,
      but have not had an opportunity to sit down and write an
      introduction until now. I was so happy to find this group, I've been
      looking for just such a group for a few years and am glad to finally
      find a forum with other yurt dwellers (current and soon to be).

      My husband and I have been living full time in our 30 foot Pacific
      Yurt since August of 1999. We left northern California and moved to
      the upper midwest and built our homestead on twenty acres of land
      made available to us by a family member. After searching for
      affordable kit type housing we stumbled upon the idea of building a
      yurt after seeing a segment on Nesting Bird yurts (now Rainier
      Yurts) on HGTV. After doing research on the Internet we chose to
      build a yurt rather than a dome home or something similar for a
      variety of reasons, such as cost and our basic lack of building
      experience.

      At the time, the companies that were online and that we received
      materials from were Pacific Yurts, Nesting Bird, and Advanced Canvas
      (now Colorado Yurt Company). We also briefly considered a Pacific
      Dome (pacificdomes.com), but were very attached at that point to the
      yurt concept. (I would thing that anyone living in a Pacific Dome,
      which is fabric covered, or a tipi may also be good members for this
      group). Nesting Bird was very attractive, but about $2,000 more than
      the PY; and Advanced Canvas did not have all of the options we
      wanted. Further, we were comforted by Pacific Yurts longevity in the
      business and their excellent staff and high quality. We also went to
      a campground near Yosemite that had a few Pacific Yurts for lodging
      and were very impressed. We have never regretted our choice. I so
      admire those of you who are going it alone and building without a
      kit. For us that was really not an option. We felt like pioneers as
      it was!

      We built the deck ourselves in about five weeks using a Coleman 5000
      watt generator for building, and with the help of two friends (and
      about five more supporters bringing in food and helping with smaller
      stuff) we got most the of the yurt up in one day. My husband and I
      then did the lacing of the covers and finished up the next day.

      We moved into an empty shell and began working on the interior. We
      did choose to have electrical service hooked up and did the wiring
      ourselves while hunched over our Ortho Electrical book that we got
      from Home Depot. What a thrill it was to turn on our first light a
      couple of weeks after moving in! Since then, it has been a slow
      process that continues to this day. My husband and I (mostly my
      husband) have done all of the interior building ourselves. We have
      built an indoor bathroom, that includes closet space and storage and
      a loft which serves as our bedroom. We have a rather standard
      kitchen with a propane range, 1960s style refrigerator we bought at
      a garage sale, a sink unit and two free standing cupboard/pantries
      for food storage and dishes.

      We do not have running water, we carry our utility and bathing water
      in and buy bottled drinking water. Although this has really worked
      fine for us up to this point, we are seriously considering having a
      well drilled this summer.

      In the bathroom, we started out with a Sunmar composting toilet that
      we purchased for more than $1,000. However this did not work well
      for us. We found it to be messy to remove the compost and were less
      than happy with the process of indoor composting. We have since
      removed it and opted for a sawdust toilet system (modeled after
      systems in the Humanure Handbook) which is the standard wooden box
      with toilet seat set over a black 5-gallon bucket, which we haul out
      to composting bins we have built several hundred feet from the yurt.
      It works so much better! I wish we would had saved that $1,000!!

      We heat with wood and have a Vermont Casting Federal woodstove. It
      serves as the sole heater for the entire yurt and does fine on it's
      own until it gets to be about -20 below or colder, then we augment
      with a kerosene heater during the day and extra blankets at night.
      Actually when it gets very cold the yurt igloos pretty well, sealing
      up with ice. We had one stretch of cold last winter where the temps
      hit -50 (not windchill -- actual temps)! We did fine.

      We have survived the cold, severe thunderstorms with lightening too
      close for comfort, winds up to 75 mph, and heat up to 100 degrees.
      Although not always completely comfortable (it does get hot in the
      summer during the day and we work hard to keep up when it is very
      cold), one of the things I love most about yurt living is the very
      tactile feeling of living on the earth. Rather than feeling like I'm
      inside a building, I feel like I'm sheltered from, but part of the
      outdoors. We hear the wind coming from across the lake rumbling
      toward us sometimes like a freight train. The rain falling on the
      roof sounds like mother nature using our yurt like a giant drum. We
      watch lightening storms through our dome. We hear the geese coming
      in for a landing on the lake which we are separated from by about
      300 feet of swamp. We hear the call of the loons at 2 am in the
      summer and the great gray owls that inhabit our oak grove in the
      winter. It is beyond compare.

      There is certainly always something to do. Soon we will start
      gardening again, moving toward the goal of growing a good majority
      of our own food. As I mentioned we are considering installing a well
      this year, and would like to build an outdoor deck. Also on our list
      we'll try and get that mud room attached to the front entrance that
      has been on our to-do list from day one.

      We had originally planned on the yurt serving as home for a few
      years until we got on building a more permanent structure, and we
      still plan on doing that some day. However, we have so settled into
      yurt living we are planning on adding a second yurt in the future as
      our space requirements grow and continue on as yurt dwellers for
      many years to come.

      I look forward to being a part of this group. I'm excited for those
      of you who are just staring out. As I said to my husband the day we
      left northern California, "Who knows what adventure lies ahead." And
      let me tell you at the time, we had no idea. :-)

      Debbie.
    • russell
      Thank you very much for sharing, Debbie, and welcome to the group! Reading your story made (makes!) me look forward even more to Operation Proud Mary s next
      Message 2 of 13 , Mar 3, 2005
        Thank you very much for sharing, Debbie, and welcome to the group! Reading your story made (makes!) me look forward even more to Operation Proud Mary's next stage -- LIVING it! I can't speak for everyone in the group, but I certainly wouldn't mind welcoming anyone else involved in "soft-sided" home living. I started this as a yurt-specific group because the only similar group addresses yurts and tipis but focuses primarily on tipis. Once again, thank you and I look forward to talking with you more in the future. I'm sure I'll have a billion questions!

        -------Original Message-------
        > From: "yurtlife" <yurtlife@...>
        > Subject: [The_Yurt_Community] Introduction
        > Sent: 04 Mar 2005 04:36:52
        >
        > Hello everyone!
        > I found this group several weeks ago, and have been reading posts,
        > but have not had an opportunity to sit down and write an
        > introduction until now. I was so happy to find this group, I've been
        > looking for just such a group for a few years and am glad to finally
        > find a forum with other yurt dwellers (current and soon to be).
        >
        > My husband and I have been living full time in our 30 foot Pacific
        > Yurt since August of 1999. We left northern California and moved to
        > the upper midwest and built our homestead on twenty acres of land
        > made available to us by a family member. After searching for
        > affordable kit type housing we stumbled upon the idea of building a
        > yurt after seeing a segment on Nesting Bird yurts (now Rainier
        > Yurts) on HGTV. After doing research on the Internet we chose to
        > build a yurt rather than a dome home or something similar for a
        > variety of reasons, such as cost and our basic lack of building
        > experience.
        >
        > At the time, the companies that were online and that we received
        > materials from were Pacific Yurts, Nesting Bird, and Advanced Canvas
        > (now Colorado Yurt Company). We also briefly considered a Pacific
        > Dome (pacificdomes.com), but were very attached at that point to the
        > yurt concept. (I would thing that anyone living in a Pacific Dome,
        > which is fabric covered, or a tipi may also be good members for this
        > group). Nesting Bird was very attractive, but about $2,000 more than
        > the PY; and Advanced Canvas did not have all of the options we
        > wanted. Further, we were comforted by Pacific Yurts longevity in the
        > business and their excellent staff and high quality. We also went to
        > a campground near Yosemite that had a few Pacific Yurts for lodging
        > and were very impressed. We have never regretted our choice. I so
        > admire those of you who are going it alone and building without a
        > kit. For us that was really not an option. We felt like pioneers as
        > it was!
        >
        > We built the deck ourselves in about five weeks using a Coleman 5000
        > watt generator for building, and with the help of two friends (and
        > about five more supporters bringing in food and helping with smaller
        > stuff) we got most the of the yurt up in one day. My husband and I
        > then did the lacing of the covers and finished up the next day.
        >
        > We moved into an empty shell and began working on the interior. We
        > did choose to have electrical service hooked up and did the wiring
        > ourselves while hunched over our Ortho Electrical book that we got
        > from Home Depot. What a thrill it was to turn on our first light a
        > couple of weeks after moving in! Since then, it has been a slow
        > process that continues to this day. My husband and I (mostly my
        > husband) have done all of the interior building ourselves. We have
        > built an indoor bathroom, that includes closet space and storage and
        > a loft which serves as our bedroom. We have a rather standard
        > kitchen with a propane range, 1960s style refrigerator we bought at
        > a garage sale, a sink unit and two free standing cupboard/pantries
        > for food storage and dishes.
        >
        > We do not have running water, we carry our utility and bathing water
        > in and buy bottled drinking water. Although this has really worked
        > fine for us up to this point, we are seriously considering having a
        > well drilled this summer.
        >
        > In the bathroom, we started out with a Sunmar composting toilet that
        > we purchased for more than $1,000. However this did not work well
        > for us. We found it to be messy to remove the compost and were less
        > than happy with the process of indoor composting. We have since
        > removed it and opted for a sawdust toilet system (modeled after
        > systems in the Humanure Handbook) which is the standard wooden box
        > with toilet seat set over a black 5-gallon bucket, which we haul out
        > to composting bins we have built several hundred feet from the yurt.
        > It works so much better! I wish we would had saved that $1,000!!
        >
        > We heat with wood and have a Vermont Casting Federal woodstove. It
        > serves as the sole heater for the entire yurt and does fine on it's
        > own until it gets to be about -20 below or colder, then we augment
        > with a kerosene heater during the day and extra blankets at night.
        > Actually when it gets very cold the yurt igloos pretty well, sealing
        > up with ice. We had one stretch of cold last winter where the temps
        > hit -50 (not windchill -- actual temps)! We did fine.
        >
        > We have survived the cold, severe thunderstorms with lightening too
        > close for comfort, winds up to 75 mph, and heat up to 100 degrees.
        > Although not always completely comfortable (it does get hot in the
        > summer during the day and we work hard to keep up when it is very
        > cold), one of the things I love most about yurt living is the very
        > tactile feeling of living on the earth. Rather than feeling like I'm
        > inside a building, I feel like I'm sheltered from, but part of the
        > outdoors. We hear the wind coming from across the lake rumbling
        > toward us sometimes like a freight train. The rain falling on the
        > roof sounds like mother nature using our yurt like a giant drum. We
        > watch lightening storms through our dome. We hear the geese coming
        > in for a landing on the lake which we are separated from by about
        > 300 feet of swamp. We hear the call of the loons at 2 am in the
        > summer and the great gray owls that inhabit our oak grove in the
        > winter. It is beyond compare.
        >
        > There is certainly always something to do. Soon we will start
        > gardening again, moving toward the goal of growing a good majority
        > of our own food. As I mentioned we are considering installing a well
        > this year, and would like to build an outdoor deck. Also on our list
        > we'll try and get that mud room attached to the front entrance that
        > has been on our to-do list from day one.
        >
        > We had originally planned on the yurt serving as home for a few
        > years until we got on building a more permanent structure, and we
        > still plan on doing that some day. However, we have so settled into
        > yurt living we are planning on adding a second yurt in the future as
        > our space requirements grow and continue on as yurt dwellers for
        > many years to come.
        >
        > I look forward to being a part of this group. I'm excited for those
        > of you who are just staring out. As I said to my husband the day we
        > left northern California, "Who knows what adventure lies ahead." And
        > let me tell you at the time, we had no idea. :-)
        >
        > Debbie.
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        -------Original Message-------
      • yurtlife
        Will, Thanks, and thanks for starting this group. Your recent update post brought back memories. We too had our ups and downs from the moment we embarked on
        Message 3 of 13 , Mar 3, 2005
          Will,
          Thanks, and thanks for starting this group. Your recent update post
          brought back memories. We too had our ups and downs from the moment
          we embarked on our journey. From breaking down near Elko, Nevada on
          our trip to problems with installing our road, our lack of knowledge
          of building materials, to living in a tent while we built during the
          rainiest summer in recent years, it was a roller coaster ride. It's
          been several years now, so the memories have faded a bit, but I
          remember tears the night before the yurt raising and severe nausea
          the morning of. Everything went great however on the yurt raising
          day. I hope it does for you as well.

          Debbie.

          --- In The_Yurt_Community@yahoogroups.com, "russell" <russell@v...>
          wrote:
          > Thank you very much for sharing, Debbie, and welcome to the
          group! Reading your story made (makes!) me look forward even more
          to Operation Proud Mary's next stage -- LIVING it! I can't speak
          for everyone in the group, but I certainly wouldn't mind welcoming
          anyone else involved in "soft-sided" home living. I started this as
          a yurt-specific group because the only similar group addresses yurts
          and tipis but focuses primarily on tipis. Once again, thank you and
          I look forward to talking with you more in the future. I'm sure
          I'll have a billion questions!
        • frameteam2003
          Hi my name is sam I built a yurt just for fun it was built as cheaply as I could and I m still workin on it as I have time. It is a 14 diameter yurt so it
          Message 4 of 13 , May 14, 2011
            Hi my name is sam
            I built a yurt just for fun
            it was built as cheaply as I could and I'm still workin on it as I have time.
            It is a 14' diameter yurt so it doesn't take a lot of plywood for the flooring.And I did build the floor to be taken apart if needed.
            I did use political signs as a covering but plan on again covering them so they will last longer. I tryed those cheap plactic woven tarps but they didn't last very long.Signs are better.You can check out some photos under sam 14' yurt
            I'm really impressed with some of the larger yurts in the photos.---sam
          • Marshall Eppley
            hello sam welcome ... From: frameteam2003 Subject: [The_Yurt_Community] Introduction To: The_Yurt_Community@yahoogroups.com Date:
            Message 5 of 13 , May 15, 2011
              hello sam welcome

              --- On Sat, 5/14/11, frameteam2003 <frameteam2003@...> wrote:

              From: frameteam2003 <frameteam2003@...>
              Subject: [The_Yurt_Community] Introduction
              To: The_Yurt_Community@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Saturday, May 14, 2011, 10:37 PM

               

              Hi my name is sam
              I built a yurt just for fun
              it was built as cheaply as I could and I'm still workin on it as I have time.
              It is a 14' diameter yurt so it doesn't take a lot of plywood for the flooring.And I did build the floor to be taken apart if needed.
              I did use political signs as a covering but plan on again covering them so they will last longer. I tryed those cheap plactic woven tarps but they didn't last very long.Signs are better.You can check out some photos under sam 14' yurt
              I'm really impressed with some of the larger yurts in the photos.---sam

            • ben_azo
              Welcome Sam , thanks for posting the selfexplaining photos! Fine informative Album , job well done. Keep us posted , I always love to learn what works. Cheers
              Message 6 of 13 , May 15, 2011
                Welcome Sam , thanks for posting the selfexplaining photos!
                Fine informative Album , job well done.
                Keep us posted , I always love to learn what works.
                Cheers
                Old Ben

                --- In The_Yurt_Community@yahoogroups.com, "frameteam2003" <frameteam2003@...> wrote:
                >
                > Hi my name is sam
                > I built a yurt just for fun
                > it was built as cheaply as I could and I'm still workin on it as I have time.
                > It is a 14' diameter yurt so it doesn't take a lot of plywood for the flooring.And I did build the floor to be taken apart if needed.
                > I did use political signs as a covering but plan on again covering them so they will last longer. I tryed those cheap plactic woven tarps but they didn't last very long.Signs are better.You can check out some photos under sam 14' yurt
                > I'm really impressed with some of the larger yurts in the photos.---sam
                >
              • Joe
                Hello Group! Just found this group and so happy! I have been reading through some of the posts and have found a bunch of valuable info. I have been in love
                Message 7 of 13 , May 30, 2011
                  Hello Group!

                  Just found this group and so happy! I have been reading through some of the posts and have found a bunch of valuable info.
                  I have been in love with yurts for several years now. Here in Colorado many of the ski resorts have y
                  urts as warming huts,
                  ski school rooms, and offices.

                  About a year ago I finally found some property that fit what I was looking for and my small budget. It helps that property at 12,000'
                  is on the cheaper side of things. Unfortunately it was too late in the summer to start building, and road access ended after the first
                  weekend in October.

                  I recently ordered a 24' yurt from the Colorado Yurt Company. Im so excited to be able to finally have my own resort/playground in
                  the mountains! As a skier I love the snow but, this year has been the winter that never ends! My yurt will be delivered less than 2
                  months from now and my lot is still under a few feet of snow and there is still no road access! I have a feeling these next few weeks
                  are going to be something of a whirlwind trying to get all this together.

                  I look forward to this project and sharing with the group anything I learn along the way. I started a photo album (High Yurtitude)
                  and will update it with my progress. If you Guys and Gals have any tips or tricks to setting up a yurt and platform in a high alpine
                  environment I would really appreciate it.

                  For example I have been thinking about getting a composting toilet. After reading Debbie's post about the
                  Sunmar Composting Toilet, I'm second guessing that idea. I have heard good reviews about the Envirolet Waterless Self Contained
                  with a 12v DC Fan, and have been planing on getting one. If anyone has any experience with these toilets in a snowy environment
                  any info would be great.

                  I look forward to being apart of this group and learning about yurts and yurt life as well as sharing with you all.

                  Regards,

                  Joe

                   
                  --- In The_Yurt_Community@yahoogroups.com, "yurtlife" <yurtlife@...> wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  > Hello everyone!
                  > I found this group several weeks ago, and have been reading posts,
                  > but have not had an opportunity to sit down and write an
                  > introduction until now. I was so happy to find this group, I've been
                  > looking for just such a group for a few years and am glad to finally
                  > find a forum with other yurt dwellers (current and soon to be).
                  >
                  > My husband and I have been living full time in our 30 foot Pacific
                  > Yurt since August of 1999. We left northern California and moved to
                  > the upper midwest and built our homestead on twenty acres of land
                  > made available to us by a family member. After searching for
                  > affordable kit type housing we stumbled upon the idea of building a
                  > yurt after seeing a segment on Nesting Bird yurts (now Rainier
                  > Yurts) on HGTV. After doing research on the Internet we chose to
                  > build a yurt rather than a dome home or something similar for a
                  > variety of reasons, such as cost and our basic lack of building
                  > experience.
                  >
                  > At the time, the companies that were online and that we received
                  > materials from were Pacific Yurts, Nesting Bird, and Advanced Canvas
                  > (now Colorado Yurt Company). We also briefly considered a Pacific
                  > Dome (pacificdomes.com), but were very attached at that point to the
                  > yurt concept. (I would thing that anyone living in a Pacific Dome,
                  > which is fabric covered, or a tipi may also be good members for this
                  > group). Nesting Bird was very attractive, but about $2,000 more than
                  > the PY; and Advanced Canvas did not have all of the options we
                  > wanted. Further, we were comforted by Pacific Yurts longevity in the
                  > business and their excellent staff and high quality. We also went to
                  > a campground near Yosemite that had a few Pacific Yurts for lodging
                  > and were very impressed. We have never regretted our choice. I so
                  > admire those of you who are going it alone and building without a
                  > kit. For us that was really not an option. We felt like pioneers as
                  > it was!
                  >
                  > We built the deck ourselves in about five weeks using a Coleman 5000
                  > watt generator for building, and with the help of two friends (and
                  > about five more supporters bringing in food and helping with smaller
                  > stuff) we got most the of the yurt up in one day. My husband and I
                  > then did the lacing of the covers and finished up the next day.
                  >
                  > We moved into an empty shell and began working on the interior. We
                  > did choose to have electrical service hooked up and did the wiring
                  > ourselves while hunched over our Ortho Electrical book that we got
                  > from Home Depot. What a thrill it was to turn on our first light a
                  > couple of weeks after moving in! Since then, it has been a slow
                  > process that continues to this day. My husband and I (mostly my
                  > husband) have done all of the interior building ourselves. We have
                  > built an indoor bathroom, that includes closet space and storage and
                  > a loft which serves as our bedroom. We have a rather standard
                  > kitchen with a propane range, 1960s style refrigerator we bought at
                  > a garage sale, a sink unit and two free standing cupboard/pantries
                  > for food storage and dishes.
                  >
                  > We do not have running water, we carry our utility and bathing water
                  > in and buy bottled drinking water. Although this has really worked
                  > fine for us up to this point, we are seriously considering having a
                  > well drilled this summer.
                  >
                  > In the bathroom, we started out with a Sunmar composting toilet that
                  > we purchased for more than $1,000. However this did not work well
                  > for us. We found it to be messy to remove the compost and were less
                  > than happy with the process of indoor composting. We have since
                  > removed it and opted for a sawdust toilet system (modeled after
                  > systems in the Humanure Handbook) which is the standard wooden box
                  > with toilet seat set over a black 5-gallon bucket, which we haul out
                  > to composting bins we have built several hundred feet from the yurt.
                  > It works so much better! I wish we would had saved that $1,000!!
                  >
                  > We heat with wood and have a Vermont Casting Federal woodstove. It
                  > serves as the sole heater for the entire yurt and does fine on it's
                  > own until it gets to be about -20 below or colder, then we augment
                  > with a kerosene heater during the day and extra blankets at night.
                  > Actually when it gets very cold the yurt igloos pretty well, sealing
                  > up with ice. We had one stretch of cold last winter where the temps
                  > hit -50 (not windchill -- actual temps)! We did fine.
                  >
                  > We have survived the cold, severe thunderstorms with lightening too
                  > close for comfort, winds up to 75 mph, and heat up to 100 degrees.
                  > Although not always completely comfortable (it does get hot in the
                  > summer during the day and we work hard to keep up when it is very
                  > cold), one of the things I love most about yurt living is the very
                  > tactile feeling of living on the earth. Rather than feeling like I'm
                  > inside a building, I feel like I'm sheltered from, but part of the
                  > outdoors. We hear the wind coming from across the lake rumbling
                  > toward us sometimes like a freight train. The rain falling on the
                  > roof sounds like mother nature using our yurt like a giant drum. We
                  > watch lightening storms through our dome. We hear the geese coming
                  > in for a landing on the lake which we are separated from by about
                  > 300 feet of swamp. We hear the call of the loons at 2 am in the
                  > summer and the great gray owls that inhabit our oak grove in the
                  > winter. It is beyond compare.
                  >
                  > There is certainly always something to do. Soon we will start
                  > gardening again, moving toward the goal of growing a good majority
                  > of our own food. As I mentioned we are considering installing a well
                  > this year, and would like to build an outdoor deck. Also on our list
                  > we'll try and get that mud room attached to the front entrance that
                  > has been on our to-do list from day one.
                  >
                  > We had originally planned on the yurt serving as home for a few
                  > years until we got on building a more permanent structure, and we
                  > still plan on doing that some day. However, we have so settled into
                  > yurt living we are planning on adding a second yurt in the future as
                  > our space requirements grow and continue on as yurt dwellers for
                  > many years to come.
                  >
                  > I look forward to being a part of this group. I'm excited for those
                  > of you who are just staring out. As I said to my husband the day we
                  > left northern California, "Who knows what adventure lies ahead." And
                  > let me tell you at the time, we had no idea. :-)
                  >
                  > Debbie.
                  >
                • Marshall Eppley
                  Welcome joe will watch for your post. ________________________________ From: Joe To: The_Yurt_Community@yahoogroups.com Sent:
                  Message 8 of 13 , May 30, 2011
                    Welcome joe will watch for your post.


                    From: Joe <jholmes_design@...>
                    To: The_Yurt_Community@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Monday, May 30, 2011 1:59 PM
                    Subject: [The_Yurt_Community] Re: Introduction

                     
                    Hello Group!

                    Just found this group and so happy! I have been reading through some of the posts and have found a bunch of valuable info.
                    I have been in love with yurts for several years now. Here in Colorado many of the ski resorts have y
                    urts as warming huts,
                    ski school rooms, and offices.

                    About a year ago I finally found some property that fit what I was looking for and my small budget. It helps that property at 12,000'
                    is on the cheaper side of things. Unfortunately it was too late in the summer to start building, and road access ended after the first
                    weekend in October.

                    I recently ordered a 24' yurt from the Colorado Yurt Company. Im so excited to be able to finally have my own resort/playground in
                    the mountains! As a skier I love the snow but, this year has been the winter that never ends! My yurt will be delivered less than 2
                    months from now and my lot is still under a few feet of snow and there is still no road access! I have a feeling these next few weeks
                    are going to be something of a whirlwind trying to get all this together.

                    I look forward to this project and sharing with the group anything I learn along the way. I started a photo album (High Yurtitude)
                    and will update it with my progress. If you Guys and Gals have any tips or tricks to setting up a yurt and platform in a high alpine
                    environment I would really appreciate it.

                    For example I have been thinking about getting a composting toilet. After reading Debbie's post about the
                    Sunmar Composting Toilet, I'm second guessing that idea. I have heard good reviews about the Envirolet Waterless Self Contained
                    with a 12v DC Fan, and have been planing on getting one. If anyone has any experience with these toilets in a snowy environment
                    any info would be great.

                    I look forward to being apart of this group and learning about yurts and yurt life as well as sharing with you all.

                    Regards,

                    Joe

                     
                    --- In The_Yurt_Community@yahoogroups.com, "yurtlife" <yurtlife@...> wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    > Hello everyone!
                    > I found this group several weeks ago, and have been reading posts,
                    > but have not had an opportunity to sit down and write an
                    > introduction until now. I was so happy to find this group, I've been
                    > looking for just such a group for a few years and am glad to finally
                    > find a forum with other yurt dwellers (current and soon to be).
                    >
                    > My husband and I have been living full time in our 30 foot Pacific
                    > Yurt since August of 1999. We left northern California and moved to
                    > the upper midwest and built our homestead on twenty acres of land
                    > made available to us by a family member. After searching for
                    > affordable kit type housing we stumbled upon the idea of building a
                    > yurt after seeing a segment on Nesting Bird yurts (now Rainier
                    > Yurts) on HGTV. After doing research on the Internet we chose to
                    > build a yurt rather than a dome home or something similar for a
                    > variety of reasons, such as cost and our basic lack of building
                    > experience.
                    >
                    > At the time, the companies that were online and that we received
                    > materials from were Pacific Yurts, Nesting Bird, and Advanced Canvas
                    > (now Colorado Yurt Company). We also briefly considered a Pacific
                    > Dome (pacificdomes.com), but were very attached at that point to the
                    > yurt concept. (I would thing that anyone living in a Pacific Dome,
                    > which is fabric covered, or a tipi may also be good members for this
                    > group). Nesting Bird was very attractive, but about $2,000 more than
                    > the PY; and Advanced Canvas did not have all of the options we
                    > wanted. Further, we were comforted by Pacific Yurts longevity in the
                    > business and their excellent staff and high quality. We also went to
                    > a campground near Yosemite that had a few Pacific Yurts for lodging
                    > and were very impressed. We have never regretted our choice. I so
                    > admire those of you who are going it alone and building without a
                    > kit. For us that was really not an option. We felt like pioneers as
                    > it was!
                    >
                    > We built the deck ourselves in about five weeks using a Coleman 5000
                    > watt generator for building, and with the help of two friends (and
                    > about five more supporters bringing in food and helping with smaller
                    > stuff) we got most the of the yurt up in one day. My husband and I
                    > then did the lacing of the covers and finished up the next day.
                    >
                    > We moved into an empty shell and began working on the interior. We
                    > did choose to have electrical service hooked up and did the wiring
                    > ourselves while hunched over our Ortho Electrical book that we got
                    > from Home Depot. What a thrill it was to turn on our first light a
                    > couple of weeks after moving in! Since then, it has been a slow
                    > process that continues to this day. My husband and I (mostly my
                    > husband) have done all of the interior building ourselves. We have
                    > built an indoor bathroom, that includes closet space and storage and
                    > a loft which serves as our bedroom. We have a rather standard
                    > kitchen with a propane range, 1960s style refrigerator we bought at
                    > a garage sale, a sink unit and two free standing cupboard/pantries
                    > for food storage and dishes.
                    >
                    > We do not have running water, we carry our utility and bathing water
                    > in and buy bottled drinking water. Although this has really worked
                    > fine for us up to this point, we are seriously considering having a
                    > well drilled this summer.
                    >
                    > In the bathroom, we started out with a Sunmar composting toilet that
                    > we purchased for more than $1,000. However this did not work well
                    > for us. We found it to be messy to remove the compost and were less
                    > than happy with the process of indoor composting. We have since
                    > removed it and opted for a sawdust toilet system (modeled after
                    > systems in the Humanure Handbook) which is the standard wooden box
                    > with toilet seat set over a black 5-gallon bucket, which we haul out
                    > to composting bins we have built several hundred feet from the yurt.
                    > It works so much better! I wish we would had saved that $1,000!!
                    >
                    > We heat with wood and have a Vermont Casting Federal woodstove. It
                    > serves as the sole heater for the entire yurt and does fine on it's
                    > own until it gets to be about -20 below or colder, then we augment
                    > with a kerosene heater during the day and extra blankets at night.
                    > Actually when it gets very cold the yurt igloos pretty well, sealing
                    > up with ice. We had one stretch of cold last winter where the temps
                    > hit -50 (not windchill -- actual temps)! We did fine.
                    >
                    > We have survived the cold, severe thunderstorms with lightening too
                    > close for comfort, winds up to 75 mph, and heat up to 100 degrees.
                    > Although not always completely comfortable (it does get hot in the
                    > summer during the day and we work hard to keep up when it is very
                    > cold), one of the things I love most about yurt living is the very
                    > tactile feeling of living on the earth. Rather than feeling like I'm
                    > inside a building, I feel like I'm sheltered from, but part of the
                    > outdoors. We hear the wind coming from across the lake rumbling
                    > toward us sometimes like a freight train. The rain falling on the
                    > roof sounds like mother nature using our yurt like a giant drum. We
                    > watch lightening storms through our dome. We hear the geese coming
                    > in for a landing on the lake which we are separated from by about
                    > 300 feet of swamp. We hear the call of the loons at 2 am in the
                    > summer and the great gray owls that inhabit our oak grove in the
                    > winter. It is beyond compare.
                    >
                    > There is certainly always something to do. Soon we will start
                    > gardening again, moving toward the goal of growing a good majority
                    > of our own food. As I mentioned we are considering installing a well
                    > this year, and would like to build an outdoor deck. Also on our list
                    > we'll try and get that mud room attached to the front entrance that
                    > has been on our to-do list from day one.
                    >
                    > We had originally planned on the yurt serving as home for a few
                    > years until we got on building a more permanent structure, and we
                    > still plan on doing that some day. However, we have so settled into
                    > yurt living we are planning on adding a second yurt in the future as
                    > our space requirements grow and continue on as yurt dwellers for
                    > many years to come.
                    >
                    > I look forward to being a part of this group. I'm excited for those
                    > of you who are just staring out. As I said to my husband the day we
                    > left northern California, "Who knows what adventure lies ahead." And
                    > let me tell you at the time, we had no idea. :-)
                    >
                    > Debbie.
                    >


                  • ben_azo
                    Hi Joe , welcome & thanks for uploading the beautifull pictures. WOAW , I like your land...very very much!!! I dreamed about the nice building I could design &
                    Message 9 of 13 , May 30, 2011
                      Hi Joe , welcome & thanks for uploading the beautifull pictures.
                      WOAW , I like your land...very very much!!!
                      I dreamed about the nice building I could design & build
                      re-using the wood from that silvermine.

                      Erecting the yurt on the best spot is your first problem to solve.
                      flat , slooped or heavely slooped land ? with what sort of
                      underground ? ; cause the yurts platform is as important
                      as the yurt itself on such type of land.
                      Just see the Groups intro-picture and or French Mountain Yurt in
                      ALL FAVORITE YURTS photoAlbum as an illustration.

                      As an avid skyer tou know all the funny things snow can do.

                      http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/compost-toilet/
                      in Links is a fine Link on that Topic
                      that Group has international real year round users ,
                      so they know what works & not.

                      Please keep us posted and feel free to pick my brain.
                      Are you planning full time occupancy
                      or just the sky-season?
                      Glamping in paradise....many will envy you.

                      Voila , enough for today.
                      Cheers
                      Old Ben

                      --- In The_Yurt_Community@yahoogroups.com, "Joe" <jholmes_design@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Hello Group!
                      >
                      > Just found this group and so happy! I have been reading through some of
                      > the posts and have found a bunch of valuable info.
                      > I have been in love with yurts for several years now. Here in Colorado
                      > many of the ski resorts have yurts as warming huts,
                      > ski school rooms, and offices.
                      >
                      > About a year ago I finally found some property that fit what I was
                      > looking for and my small budget. It helps that property at 12,000'
                      > is on the cheaper side of things. Unfortunately it was too late in the
                      > summer to start building, and road access ended after the first
                      > weekend in October.
                      >
                      > I recently ordered a 24' yurt from the Colorado Yurt Company. Im so
                      > excited to be able to finally have my own resort/playground in
                      > the mountains! As a skier I love the snow but, this year has been the
                      > winter that never ends! My yurt will be delivered less than 2
                      > months from now and my lot is still under a few feet of snow and there
                      > is still no road access! I have a feeling these next few weeks
                      > are going to be something of a whirlwind trying to get all this
                      > together.
                      >
                      > I look forward to this project and sharing with the group anything I
                      > learn along the way. I started a photo album (High Yurtitude)
                      > and will update it with my progress. If you Guys and Gals have any tips
                      > or tricks to setting up a yurt and platform in a high alpine
                      > environment I would really appreciate it.
                      >
                      > For example I have been thinking about getting a composting toilet.
                      > After reading Debbie's post about the
                      > Sunmar Composting Toilet, I'm second guessing that idea. I have heard
                      > good reviews about the Envirolet Waterless Self Contained
                      > with a 12v DC Fan, and have been planing on getting one. If anyone has
                      > any experience with these toilets in a snowy environment
                      > any info would be great.
                      >
                      > I look forward to being apart of this group and learning about yurts and
                      > yurt life as well as sharing with you all.
                      >
                      > Regards,
                      >
                      > Joe
                      >
                      > --- In The_Yurt_Community@yahoogroups.com, "yurtlife" <yurtlife@>
                      > wrote:
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > Hello everyone!
                      > > I found this group several weeks ago, and have been reading posts,
                      > > but have not had an opportunity to sit down and write an
                      > > introduction until now. I was so happy to find this group, I've been
                      > > looking for just such a group for a few years and am glad to finally
                      > > find a forum with other yurt dwellers (current and soon to be).
                      > >
                      > > My husband and I have been living full time in our 30 foot Pacific
                      > > Yurt since August of 1999. We left northern California and moved to
                      > > the upper midwest and built our homestead on twenty acres of land
                      > > made available to us by a family member. After searching for
                      > > affordable kit type housing we stumbled upon the idea of building a
                      > > yurt after seeing a segment on Nesting Bird yurts (now Rainier
                      > > Yurts) on HGTV. After doing research on the Internet we chose to
                      > > build a yurt rather than a dome home or something similar for a
                      > > variety of reasons, such as cost and our basic lack of building
                      > > experience.
                      > >
                      > > At the time, the companies that were online and that we received
                      > > materials from were Pacific Yurts, Nesting Bird, and Advanced Canvas
                      > > (now Colorado Yurt Company). We also briefly considered a Pacific
                      > > Dome (pacificdomes.com), but were very attached at that point to the
                      > > yurt concept. (I would thing that anyone living in a Pacific Dome,
                      > > which is fabric covered, or a tipi may also be good members for this
                      > > group). Nesting Bird was very attractive, but about $2,000 more than
                      > > the PY; and Advanced Canvas did not have all of the options we
                      > > wanted. Further, we were comforted by Pacific Yurts longevity in the
                      > > business and their excellent staff and high quality. We also went to
                      > > a campground near Yosemite that had a few Pacific Yurts for lodging
                      > > and were very impressed. We have never regretted our choice. I so
                      > > admire those of you who are going it alone and building without a
                      > > kit. For us that was really not an option. We felt like pioneers as
                      > > it was!
                      > >
                      > > We built the deck ourselves in about five weeks using a Coleman 5000
                      > > watt generator for building, and with the help of two friends (and
                      > > about five more supporters bringing in food and helping with smaller
                      > > stuff) we got most the of the yurt up in one day. My husband and I
                      > > then did the lacing of the covers and finished up the next day.
                      > >
                      > > We moved into an empty shell and began working on the interior. We
                      > > did choose to have electrical service hooked up and did the wiring
                      > > ourselves while hunched over our Ortho Electrical book that we got
                      > > from Home Depot. What a thrill it was to turn on our first light a
                      > > couple of weeks after moving in! Since then, it has been a slow
                      > > process that continues to this day. My husband and I (mostly my
                      > > husband) have done all of the interior building ourselves. We have
                      > > built an indoor bathroom, that includes closet space and storage and
                      > > a loft which serves as our bedroom. We have a rather standard
                      > > kitchen with a propane range, 1960s style refrigerator we bought at
                      > > a garage sale, a sink unit and two free standing cupboard/pantries
                      > > for food storage and dishes.
                      > >
                      > > We do not have running water, we carry our utility and bathing water
                      > > in and buy bottled drinking water. Although this has really worked
                      > > fine for us up to this point, we are seriously considering having a
                      > > well drilled this summer.
                      > >
                      > > In the bathroom, we started out with a Sunmar composting toilet that
                      > > we purchased for more than $1,000. However this did not work well
                      > > for us. We found it to be messy to remove the compost and were less
                      > > than happy with the process of indoor composting. We have since
                      > > removed it and opted for a sawdust toilet system (modeled after
                      > > systems in the Humanure Handbook) which is the standard wooden box
                      > > with toilet seat set over a black 5-gallon bucket, which we haul out
                      > > to composting bins we have built several hundred feet from the yurt.
                      > > It works so much better! I wish we would had saved that $1,000!!
                      > >
                      > > We heat with wood and have a Vermont Casting Federal woodstove. It
                      > > serves as the sole heater for the entire yurt and does fine on it's
                      > > own until it gets to be about -20 below or colder, then we augment
                      > > with a kerosene heater during the day and extra blankets at night.
                      > > Actually when it gets very cold the yurt igloos pretty well, sealing
                      > > up with ice. We had one stretch of cold last winter where the temps
                      > > hit -50 (not windchill -- actual temps)! We did fine.
                      > >
                      > > We have survived the cold, severe thunderstorms with lightening too
                      > > close for comfort, winds up to 75 mph, and heat up to 100 degrees.
                      > > Although not always completely comfortable (it does get hot in the
                      > > summer during the day and we work hard to keep up when it is very
                      > > cold), one of the things I love most about yurt living is the very
                      > > tactile feeling of living on the earth. Rather than feeling like I'm
                      > > inside a building, I feel like I'm sheltered from, but part of the
                      > > outdoors. We hear the wind coming from across the lake rumbling
                      > > toward us sometimes like a freight train. The rain falling on the
                      > > roof sounds like mother nature using our yurt like a giant drum. We
                      > > watch lightening storms through our dome. We hear the geese coming
                      > > in for a landing on the lake which we are separated from by about
                      > > 300 feet of swamp. We hear the call of the loons at 2 am in the
                      > > summer and the great gray owls that inhabit our oak grove in the
                      > > winter. It is beyond compare.
                      > >
                      > > There is certainly always something to do. Soon we will start
                      > > gardening again, moving toward the goal of growing a good majority
                      > > of our own food. As I mentioned we are considering installing a well
                      > > this year, and would like to build an outdoor deck. Also on our list
                      > > we'll try and get that mud room attached to the front entrance that
                      > > has been on our to-do list from day one.
                      > >
                      > > We had originally planned on the yurt serving as home for a few
                      > > years until we got on building a more permanent structure, and we
                      > > still plan on doing that some day. However, we have so settled into
                      > > yurt living we are planning on adding a second yurt in the future as
                      > > our space requirements grow and continue on as yurt dwellers for
                      > > many years to come.
                      > >
                      > > I look forward to being a part of this group. I'm excited for those
                      > > of you who are just staring out. As I said to my husband the day we
                      > > left northern California, "Who knows what adventure lies ahead." And
                      > > let me tell you at the time, we had no idea. :-)
                      > >
                      > > Debbie.
                      > >
                      >
                    • Joe
                      Thanks Ben, I like how you built up the footings with the rock a much more natural look than a deck platform, and its giving me some ideas! The lot is
                      Message 10 of 13 , May 31, 2011
                        Thanks Ben,

                        I like how you built up the footings with the rock a much more natural look than a deck platform,
                        and its giving me some ideas!

                        The lot is moderately to heavily sloped on the north side of the hill. About the same as in the
                        French Mountain Yurt.JPG. The soil is medium to small rock compacted with a light soil
                        top layer. I have been doing some research on footings but as I don't have much experience
                        in construction Im planing on getting help with the lay out and footings, then doing the rest myself.

                        So far I'm planing on using the yurt for weekends or possible extended stays for a couple of months.
                        I'm not sure If I could make the transition to living full time off grid just yet. I love snow but being snowed in
                        for 8 months out of the year could be a little much. But after being laid off and looking for full time
                        work for about two years now I have been joking that I just might have to live up there! Next summer I
                        would like to experiment with high altitude gardening.

                        Thanks for the warm welcome and the ideas!

                        Regards

                        Joe
                         
                        --- In The_Yurt_Community@yahoogroups.com, "ben_azo" <ben_azo@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Hi Joe , welcome & thanks for uploading the beautifull pictures.
                        > WOAW , I like your land...very very much!!!
                        > I dreamed about the nice building I could design & build
                        > re-using the wood from that silvermine.
                        >
                        > Erecting the yurt on the best spot is your first problem to solve.
                        > flat , slooped or heavely slooped land ? with what sort of
                        > underground ? ; cause the yurts platform is as important
                        > as the yurt itself on such type of land.
                        > Just see the Groups intro-picture and or French Mountain Yurt in
                        > ALL FAVORITE YURTS photoAlbum as an illustration.
                        >
                        > As an avid skyer tou know all the funny things snow can do.
                        >
                        > http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/compost-toilet/
                        > in Links is a fine Link on that Topic
                        > that Group has international real year round users ,
                        > so they know what works & not.
                        >
                        > Please keep us posted and feel free to pick my brain.
                        > Are you planning full time occupancy
                        > or just the sky-season?
                        > Glamping in paradise....many will envy you.
                        >
                        > Voila , enough for today.
                        > Cheers
                        > Old Ben
                        >
                        > --- In The_Yurt_Community@yahoogroups.com, "Joe" jholmes_design@ wrote:
                        > >
                        > > Hello Group!
                        > >
                        > > Just found this group and so happy! I have been reading through some of
                        > > the posts and have found a bunch of valuable info.
                        > > I have been in love with yurts for several years now. Here in Colorado
                        > > many of the ski resorts have yurts as warming huts,
                        > > ski school rooms, and offices.
                        > >
                        > > About a year ago I finally found some property that fit what I was
                        > > looking for and my small budget. It helps that property at 12,000'
                        > > is on the cheaper side of things. Unfortunately it was too late in the
                        > > summer to start building, and road access ended after the first
                        > > weekend in October.
                        > >
                        > > I recently ordered a 24' yurt from the Colorado Yurt Company. Im so
                        > > excited to be able to finally have my own resort/playground in
                        > > the mountains! As a skier I love the snow but, this year has been the
                        > > winter that never ends! My yurt will be delivered less than 2
                        > > months from now and my lot is still under a few feet of snow and there
                        > > is still no road access! I have a feeling these next few weeks
                        > > are going to be something of a whirlwind trying to get all this
                        > > together.
                        > >
                        > > I look forward to this project and sharing with the group anything I
                        > > learn along the way. I started a photo album (High Yurtitude)
                        > > and will update it with my progress. If you Guys and Gals have any tips
                        > > or tricks to setting up a yurt and platform in a high alpine
                        > > environment I would really appreciate it.
                        > >
                        > > For example I have been thinking about getting a composting toilet.
                        > > After reading Debbie's post about the
                        > > Sunmar Composting Toilet, I'm second guessing that idea. I have heard
                        > > good reviews about the Envirolet Waterless Self Contained
                        > > with a 12v DC Fan, and have been planing on getting one. If anyone has
                        > > any experience with these toilets in a snowy environment
                        > > any info would be great.
                        > >
                        > > I look forward to being apart of this group and learning about yurts and
                        > > yurt life as well as sharing with you all.
                        > >
                        > > Regards,
                        > >
                        > > Joe
                        > >
                        > > --- In The_Yurt_Community@yahoogroups.com, "yurtlife" <yurtlife@>
                        > > wrote:
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > > Hello everyone!
                        > > > I found this group several weeks ago, and have been reading posts,
                        > > > but have not had an opportunity to sit down and write an
                        > > > introduction until now. I was so happy to find this group, I've been
                        > > > looking for just such a group for a few years and am glad to finally
                        > > > find a forum with other yurt dwellers (current and soon to be).
                        > > >
                        > > > My husband and I have been living full time in our 30 foot Pacific
                        > > > Yurt since August of 1999. We left northern California and moved to
                        > > > the upper midwest and built our homestead on twenty acres of land
                        > > > made available to us by a family member. After searching for
                        > > > affordable kit type housing we stumbled upon the idea of building a
                        > > > yurt after seeing a segment on Nesting Bird yurts (now Rainier
                        > > > Yurts) on HGTV. After doing research on the Internet we chose to
                        > > > build a yurt rather than a dome home or something similar for a
                        > > > variety of reasons, such as cost and our basic lack of building
                        > > > experience.
                        > > >
                        > > > At the time, the companies that were online and that we received
                        > > > materials from were Pacific Yurts, Nesting Bird, and Advanced Canvas
                        > > > (now Colorado Yurt Company). We also briefly considered a Pacific
                        > > > Dome (pacificdomes.com), but were very attached at that point to the
                        > > > yurt concept. (I would thing that anyone living in a Pacific Dome,
                        > > > which is fabric covered, or a tipi may also be good members for this
                        > > > group). Nesting Bird was very attractive, but about $2,000 more than
                        > > > the PY; and Advanced Canvas did not have all of the options we
                        > > > wanted. Further, we were comforted by Pacific Yurts longevity in the
                        > > > business and their excellent staff and high quality. We also went to
                        > > > a campground near Yosemite that had a few Pacific Yurts for lodging
                        > > > and were very impressed. We have never regretted our choice. I so
                        > > > admire those of you who are going it alone and building without a
                        > > > kit. For us that was really not an option. We felt like pioneers as
                        > > > it was!
                        > > >
                        > > > We built the deck ourselves in about five weeks using a Coleman 5000
                        > > > watt generator for building, and with the help of two friends (and
                        > > > about five more supporters bringing in food and helping with smaller
                        > > > stuff) we got most the of the yurt up in one day. My husband and I
                        > > > then did the lacing of the covers and finished up the next day.
                        > > >
                        > > > We moved into an empty shell and began working on the interior. We
                        > > > did choose to have electrical service hooked up and did the wiring
                        > > > ourselves while hunched over our Ortho Electrical book that we got
                        > > > from Home Depot. What a thrill it was to turn on our first light a
                        > > > couple of weeks after moving in! Since then, it has been a slow
                        > > > process that continues to this day. My husband and I (mostly my
                        > > > husband) have done all of the interior building ourselves. We have
                        > > > built an indoor bathroom, that includes closet space and storage and
                        > > > a loft which serves as our bedroom. We have a rather standard
                        > > > kitchen with a propane range, 1960s style refrigerator we bought at
                        > > > a garage sale, a sink unit and two free standing cupboard/pantries
                        > > > for food storage and dishes.
                        > > >
                        > > > We do not have running water, we carry our utility and bathing water
                        > > > in and buy bottled drinking water. Although this has really worked
                        > > > fine for us up to this point, we are seriously considering having a
                        > > > well drilled this summer.
                        > > >
                        > > > In the bathroom, we started out with a Sunmar composting toilet that
                        > > > we purchased for more than $1,000. However this did not work well
                        > > > for us. We found it to be messy to remove the compost and were less
                        > > > than happy with the process of indoor composting. We have since
                        > > > removed it and opted for a sawdust toilet system (modeled after
                        > > > systems in the Humanure Handbook) which is the standard wooden box
                        > > > with toilet seat set over a black 5-gallon bucket, which we haul out
                        > > > to composting bins we have built several hundred feet from the yurt.
                        > > > It works so much better! I wish we would had saved that $1,000!!
                        > > >
                        > > > We heat with wood and have a Vermont Casting Federal woodstove. It
                        > > > serves as the sole heater for the entire yurt and does fine on it's
                        > > > own until it gets to be about -20 below or colder, then we augment
                        > > > with a kerosene heater during the day and extra blankets at night.
                        > > > Actually when it gets very cold the yurt igloos pretty well, sealing
                        > > > up with ice. We had one stretch of cold last winter where the temps
                        > > > hit -50 (not windchill -- actual temps)! We did fine.
                        > > >
                        > > > We have survived the cold, severe thunderstorms with lightening too
                        > > > close for comfort, winds up to 75 mph, and heat up to 100 degrees.
                        > > > Although not always completely comfortable (it does get hot in the
                        > > > summer during the day and we work hard to keep up when it is very
                        > > > cold), one of the things I love most about yurt living is the very
                        > > > tactile feeling of living on the earth. Rather than feeling like I'm
                        > > > inside a building, I feel like I'm sheltered from, but part of the
                        > > > outdoors. We hear the wind coming from across the lake rumbling
                        > > > toward us sometimes like a freight train. The rain falling on the
                        > > > roof sounds like mother nature using our yurt like a giant drum. We
                        > > > watch lightening storms through our dome. We hear the geese coming
                        > > > in for a landing on the lake which we are separated from by about
                        > > > 300 feet of swamp. We hear the call of the loons at 2 am in the
                        > > > summer and the great gray owls that inhabit our oak grove in the
                        > > > winter. It is beyond compare.
                        > > >
                        > > > There is certainly always something to do. Soon we will start
                        > > > gardening again, moving toward the goal of growing a good majority
                        > > > of our own food. As I mentioned we are considering installing a well
                        > > > this year, and would like to build an outdoor deck. Also on our list
                        > > > we'll try and get that mud room attached to the front entrance that
                        > > > has been on our to-do list from day one.
                        > > >
                        > > > We had originally planned on the yurt serving as home for a few
                        > > > years until we got on building a more permanent structure, and we
                        > > > still plan on doing that some day. However, we have so settled into
                        > > > yurt living we are planning on adding a second yurt in the future as
                        > > > our space requirements grow and continue on as yurt dwellers for
                        > > > many years to come.
                        > > >
                        > > > I look forward to being a part of this group. I'm excited for those
                        > > > of you who are just staring out. As I said to my husband the day we
                        > > > left northern California, "Who knows what adventure lies ahead." And
                        > > > let me tell you at the time, we had no idea. :-)
                        > > >
                        > > > Debbie.
                        > > >
                        > >
                        >
                      • ben_azo
                        Some more comments or tips if I may . Most of the time , most Yurts lack termal mass , even if some are starting to fill that gap. Yurts are very ligth
                        Message 11 of 13 , May 31, 2011
                          Some more comments or tips if I may .
                          Most of the time , most Yurts lack termal mass , even if some
                          are starting to fill that gap.
                          Yurts are very ligth compared to conventional buildings ,
                          So you may consider cheap , ligth , fast and easy to build
                          foundations , under the yurt ( imagine a nice double glazed window
                          in between the opening between the 2 rockpillars in the French
                          mountain yurt and or have a look at 'In not on Mountainslope' jpg
                          in the 'Yurt Like Things' Photo-album to see what I have in mind.

                          All you need is an easy snow & waterreleassing way around your
                          yurtfoundation , a local expert could tell you how similar builds
                          are anchored localy , I forsee no problems in such soils
                          better check it!!!!

                          An extra safe strong room with a vieuw and terasse under the yurt
                          would give you heat-retaining termal mass +
                          extra space you may be happy having later.....

                          You could rent out the off grid little paradise
                          to skyers , hunters...a couple in love wanting some calm
                          can the property be accessed with a snowmobile or
                          a wagon on skys behind a horse like in Switserland?

                          I was supposed to go to Zanzibar :-) the locals burned down
                          the dancing places and chased away the hoockers that came from
                          the meanland and turned paradise into a cheap Mexican type resort
                          I support the locals a 100% but will only return once peace back
                          or never...if figthing continues like much over Africa.

                          I am in Belgium rigth now , to far to come and do the job.
                          A local architect may take the job , and do it , like he would do it
                          for himself....payment....easy to agree upon in my eyes
                          against use of one of the studios....up or downstairs .
                          A swap of services...no taxes LOL

                          I am old , but not senile yet , hahaha , you came to
                          the best Groups for your Yurting or shall I say
                          High Yurtitude projects ( Yurtitude OMG what a nice name :-)

                          Keep us posted and feel free to call me an old fool.
                          Cheers
                          Old Ben

                          --- In The_Yurt_Community@yahoogroups.com, "Joe" <jholmes_design@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > Thanks Ben,
                          >
                          > I like how you built up the footings with the rock a much more natural
                          > look than a deck platform,
                          > and its giving me some ideas!
                          >
                          > The lot is moderately to heavily sloped on the north side of the hill.
                          > About the same as in the
                          > French Mountain Yurt.JPG. The soil is medium to small rock compacted
                          > with a light soil
                          > top layer. I have been doing some research on footings but as I don't
                          > have much experience
                          > in construction Im planing on getting help with the lay out and
                          > footings, then doing the rest myself.
                          >
                          > So far I'm planing on using the yurt for weekends or possible extended
                          > stays for a couple of months.
                          > I'm not sure If I could make the transition to living full time off grid
                          > just yet. I love snow but being snowed in
                          > for 8 months out of the year could be a little much. But after being
                          > laid off and looking for full time
                          > work for about two years now I have been joking that I just might have
                          > to live up there! Next summer I
                          > would like to experiment with high altitude gardening.
                          >
                          > Thanks for the warm welcome and the ideas!
                          >
                          > Regards
                          >
                          > Joe
                          >
                          > --- In The_Yurt_Community@yahoogroups.com, "ben_azo" <ben_azo@>
                          > wrote:
                          > >
                          > > Hi Joe , welcome & thanks for uploading the beautifull pictures.
                          > > WOAW , I like your land...very very much!!!
                          > > I dreamed about the nice building I could design & build
                          > > re-using the wood from that silvermine.
                          > >
                          > > Erecting the yurt on the best spot is your first problem to solve.
                          > > flat , slooped or heavely slooped land ? with what sort of
                          > > underground ? ; cause the yurts platform is as important
                          > > as the yurt itself on such type of land.
                          > > Just see the Groups intro-picture and or French Mountain Yurt in
                          > > ALL FAVORITE YURTS photoAlbum as an illustration.
                          > >
                          > > As an avid skyer tou know all the funny things snow can do.
                          > >
                          > > http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/compost-toilet/
                          > > in Links is a fine Link on that Topic
                          > > that Group has international real year round users ,
                          > > so they know what works & not.
                          > >
                          > > Please keep us posted and feel free to pick my brain.
                          > > Are you planning full time occupancy
                          > > or just the sky-season?
                          > > Glamping in paradise....many will envy you.
                          > >
                          > > Voila , enough for today.
                          > > Cheers
                          > > Old Ben
                          > >
                          > > --- In The_Yurt_Community@yahoogroups.com, "Joe" jholmes_design@
                          > wrote:
                          > > >
                          > > > Hello Group!
                          > > >
                          > > > Just found this group and so happy! I have been reading through some
                          > of
                          > > > the posts and have found a bunch of valuable info.
                          > > > I have been in love with yurts for several years now. Here in
                          > Colorado
                          > > > many of the ski resorts have yurts as warming huts,
                          > > > ski school rooms, and offices.
                          > > >
                          > > > About a year ago I finally found some property that fit what I was
                          > > > looking for and my small budget. It helps that property at 12,000'
                          > > > is on the cheaper side of things. Unfortunately it was too late in
                          > the
                          > > > summer to start building, and road access ended after the first
                          > > > weekend in October.
                          > > >
                          > > > I recently ordered a 24' yurt from the Colorado Yurt Company. Im so
                          > > > excited to be able to finally have my own resort/playground in
                          > > > the mountains! As a skier I love the snow but, this year has been
                          > the
                          > > > winter that never ends! My yurt will be delivered less than 2
                          > > > months from now and my lot is still under a few feet of snow and
                          > there
                          > > > is still no road access! I have a feeling these next few weeks
                          > > > are going to be something of a whirlwind trying to get all this
                          > > > together.
                          > > >
                          > > > I look forward to this project and sharing with the group anything I
                          > > > learn along the way. I started a photo album (High Yurtitude)
                          > > > and will update it with my progress. If you Guys and Gals have any
                          > tips
                          > > > or tricks to setting up a yurt and platform in a high alpine
                          > > > environment I would really appreciate it.
                          > > >
                          > > > For example I have been thinking about getting a composting toilet.
                          > > > After reading Debbie's post about the
                          > > > Sunmar Composting Toilet, I'm second guessing that idea. I have
                          > heard
                          > > > good reviews about the Envirolet Waterless Self Contained
                          > > > with a 12v DC Fan, and have been planing on getting one. If anyone
                          > has
                          > > > any experience with these toilets in a snowy environment
                          > > > any info would be great.
                          > > >
                          > > > I look forward to being apart of this group and learning about yurts
                          > and
                          > > > yurt life as well as sharing with you all.
                          > > >
                          > > > Regards,
                          > > >
                          > > > Joe
                          > > >
                          > > > --- In The_Yurt_Community@yahoogroups.com, "yurtlife" <yurtlife@>
                          > > > wrote:
                          > > > >
                          > > > >
                          > > > > Hello everyone!
                          > > > > I found this group several weeks ago, and have been reading posts,
                          > > > > but have not had an opportunity to sit down and write an
                          > > > > introduction until now. I was so happy to find this group, I've
                          > been
                          > > > > looking for just such a group for a few years and am glad to
                          > finally
                          > > > > find a forum with other yurt dwellers (current and soon to be).
                          > > > >
                          > > > > My husband and I have been living full time in our 30 foot Pacific
                          > > > > Yurt since August of 1999. We left northern California and moved
                          > to
                          > > > > the upper midwest and built our homestead on twenty acres of land
                          > > > > made available to us by a family member. After searching for
                          > > > > affordable kit type housing we stumbled upon the idea of building
                          > a
                          > > > > yurt after seeing a segment on Nesting Bird yurts (now Rainier
                          > > > > Yurts) on HGTV. After doing research on the Internet we chose to
                          > > > > build a yurt rather than a dome home or something similar for a
                          > > > > variety of reasons, such as cost and our basic lack of building
                          > > > > experience.
                          > > > >
                          > > > > At the time, the companies that were online and that we received
                          > > > > materials from were Pacific Yurts, Nesting Bird, and Advanced
                          > Canvas
                          > > > > (now Colorado Yurt Company). We also briefly considered a Pacific
                          > > > > Dome (pacificdomes.com), but were very attached at that point to
                          > the
                          > > > > yurt concept. (I would thing that anyone living in a Pacific Dome,
                          > > > > which is fabric covered, or a tipi may also be good members for
                          > this
                          > > > > group). Nesting Bird was very attractive, but about $2,000 more
                          > than
                          > > > > the PY; and Advanced Canvas did not have all of the options we
                          > > > > wanted. Further, we were comforted by Pacific Yurts longevity in
                          > the
                          > > > > business and their excellent staff and high quality. We also went
                          > to
                          > > > > a campground near Yosemite that had a few Pacific Yurts for
                          > lodging
                          > > > > and were very impressed. We have never regretted our choice. I so
                          > > > > admire those of you who are going it alone and building without a
                          > > > > kit. For us that was really not an option. We felt like pioneers
                          > as
                          > > > > it was!
                          > > > >
                          > > > > We built the deck ourselves in about five weeks using a Coleman
                          > 5000
                          > > > > watt generator for building, and with the help of two friends (and
                          > > > > about five more supporters bringing in food and helping with
                          > smaller
                          > > > > stuff) we got most the of the yurt up in one day. My husband and I
                          > > > > then did the lacing of the covers and finished up the next day.
                          > > > >
                          > > > > We moved into an empty shell and began working on the interior. We
                          > > > > did choose to have electrical service hooked up and did the wiring
                          > > > > ourselves while hunched over our Ortho Electrical book that we got
                          > > > > from Home Depot. What a thrill it was to turn on our first light a
                          > > > > couple of weeks after moving in! Since then, it has been a slow
                          > > > > process that continues to this day. My husband and I (mostly my
                          > > > > husband) have done all of the interior building ourselves. We have
                          > > > > built an indoor bathroom, that includes closet space and storage
                          > and
                          > > > > a loft which serves as our bedroom. We have a rather standard
                          > > > > kitchen with a propane range, 1960s style refrigerator we bought
                          > at
                          > > > > a garage sale, a sink unit and two free standing cupboard/pantries
                          > > > > for food storage and dishes.
                          > > > >
                          > > > > We do not have running water, we carry our utility and bathing
                          > water
                          > > > > in and buy bottled drinking water. Although this has really worked
                          > > > > fine for us up to this point, we are seriously considering having
                          > a
                          > > > > well drilled this summer.
                          > > > >
                          > > > > In the bathroom, we started out with a Sunmar composting toilet
                          > that
                          > > > > we purchased for more than $1,000. However this did not work well
                          > > > > for us. We found it to be messy to remove the compost and were
                          > less
                          > > > > than happy with the process of indoor composting. We have since
                          > > > > removed it and opted for a sawdust toilet system (modeled after
                          > > > > systems in the Humanure Handbook) which is the standard wooden box
                          > > > > with toilet seat set over a black 5-gallon bucket, which we haul
                          > out
                          > > > > to composting bins we have built several hundred feet from the
                          > yurt.
                          > > > > It works so much better! I wish we would had saved that $1,000!!
                          > > > >
                          > > > > We heat with wood and have a Vermont Casting Federal woodstove. It
                          > > > > serves as the sole heater for the entire yurt and does fine on
                          > it's
                          > > > > own until it gets to be about -20 below or colder, then we augment
                          > > > > with a kerosene heater during the day and extra blankets at night.
                          > > > > Actually when it gets very cold the yurt igloos pretty well,
                          > sealing
                          > > > > up with ice. We had one stretch of cold last winter where the
                          > temps
                          > > > > hit -50 (not windchill -- actual temps)! We did fine.
                          > > > >
                          > > > > We have survived the cold, severe thunderstorms with lightening
                          > too
                          > > > > close for comfort, winds up to 75 mph, and heat up to 100 degrees.
                          > > > > Although not always completely comfortable (it does get hot in the
                          > > > > summer during the day and we work hard to keep up when it is very
                          > > > > cold), one of the things I love most about yurt living is the very
                          > > > > tactile feeling of living on the earth. Rather than feeling like
                          > I'm
                          > > > > inside a building, I feel like I'm sheltered from, but part of the
                          > > > > outdoors. We hear the wind coming from across the lake rumbling
                          > > > > toward us sometimes like a freight train. The rain falling on the
                          > > > > roof sounds like mother nature using our yurt like a giant drum.
                          > We
                          > > > > watch lightening storms through our dome. We hear the geese coming
                          > > > > in for a landing on the lake which we are separated from by about
                          > > > > 300 feet of swamp. We hear the call of the loons at 2 am in the
                          > > > > summer and the great gray owls that inhabit our oak grove in the
                          > > > > winter. It is beyond compare.
                          > > > >
                          > > > > There is certainly always something to do. Soon we will start
                          > > > > gardening again, moving toward the goal of growing a good majority
                          > > > > of our own food. As I mentioned we are considering installing a
                          > well
                          > > > > this year, and would like to build an outdoor deck. Also on our
                          > list
                          > > > > we'll try and get that mud room attached to the front entrance
                          > that
                          > > > > has been on our to-do list from day one.
                          > > > >
                          > > > > We had originally planned on the yurt serving as home for a few
                          > > > > years until we got on building a more permanent structure, and we
                          > > > > still plan on doing that some day. However, we have so settled
                          > into
                          > > > > yurt living we are planning on adding a second yurt in the future
                          > as
                          > > > > our space requirements grow and continue on as yurt dwellers for
                          > > > > many years to come.
                          > > > >
                          > > > > I look forward to being a part of this group. I'm excited for
                          > those
                          > > > > of you who are just staring out. As I said to my husband the day
                          > we
                          > > > > left northern California, "Who knows what adventure lies ahead."
                          > And
                          > > > > let me tell you at the time, we had no idea. :-)
                          > > > >
                          > > > > Debbie.
                          > > > >
                          > > >
                          > >
                          >
                        • littleclayhouse
                          Hi there. My husband and I just finished putting up a 30 Rainier Yurt in the PNW. We aren t living in it yet, there are a lot of finishing things to get done
                          Message 12 of 13 , Nov 18, 2011
                            Hi there.

                            My husband and I just finished putting up a 30' Rainier Yurt in the PNW. We aren't living in it yet, there are a lot of finishing things to get done and we need to be able to get (and keep) it warm esp. since we have three kids. It's been a fun experience and I'm hoping that by spring we will be living full time in our little round house.

                            If anyone has suggestions on getting and keeping a yurt warm, they would be much appreciated. We are still working on finishing the insulation under the deck and we need to finish tightening the walls down. When the wind picks up, it really steals our warmth.

                            Looking forward to spending some time poking around and seeing all of your projects. I'll get our project pics up when I get a chance.

                            Peace,
                            Monika
                          • ben_azo
                            Welcome , just 1 suggestion for now. Depending on how you intend to do the heating , you should consider installing your stove on heat retaining stones they
                            Message 13 of 13 , Nov 18, 2011
                              Welcome , just 1 suggestion for now.
                              Depending on how you intend to do the heating ,
                              you should consider installing your stove on heat retaining stones
                              they will take the heat in slowly during the day and return the
                              heat slowly during the nigth....you will save lotts of energy
                              the heating topic is very interesting...
                              guessing PNW stands for Pacific North...( haha I am in Belgium or Africa :-) heating is easyer than cooling
                              looking forward to pics you intend posting
                              Cheers
                              Old Ben

                              --- In The_Yurt_Community@yahoogroups.com, "littleclayhouse" <littleclayhouse@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > Hi there.
                              >
                              > My husband and I just finished putting up a 30' Rainier Yurt in the PNW. We aren't living in it yet, there are a lot of finishing things to get done and we need to be able to get (and keep) it warm esp. since we have three kids. It's been a fun experience and I'm hoping that by spring we will be living full time in our little round house.
                              >
                              > If anyone has suggestions on getting and keeping a yurt warm, they would be much appreciated. We are still working on finishing the insulation under the deck and we need to finish tightening the walls down. When the wind picks up, it really steals our warmth.
                              >
                              > Looking forward to spending some time poking around and seeing all of your projects. I'll get our project pics up when I get a chance.
                              >
                              > Peace,
                              > Monika
                              >
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