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Re: [The_Yurt_Community] Temp expectations

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  • Jean Damgaard
    Hi Chris, I won t call you chicken, even 35F (after a little caculation) is too cold for me. Thanks for the prompt answer. HNY Jean ...
    Message 1 of 12 , Jan 1, 2007
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      Hi Chris,
      I won't call you chicken, even 35F (after a little
      caculation) is too cold for me. Thanks for the prompt
      answer.

      HNY
      Jean
      --- Chris Fuhr <instructorhasgonedigital@...>
      wrote:

      > 32 is freezing so it's in the minus C by a bit. An
      > easy is for every one C subtract 3 degrees so I'd
      > guess -4C to -6C.
      >
      > I don't have too much trouble down to 20 but after
      > that call me chicken or what you will I just dont'
      > do under 20.
      >
      > Lets not forget several factors
      > 1: wind chill
      > 2: Humidity
      > 3: any touch of aurthritus and you don't want to
      > leave the warm spots so your time is spent waiting
      > for the warm time
      > 4 and lets not forget the privey cold takes on a
      > hole new meaning when it 15 degrees and you need to
      > use the WC.
      >
      >
      > ----- Original Message ----
      > From: Jean Damgaard <jean.weston@...>
      > To: The_Yurt_Community@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Sunday, December 31, 2006 11:25:25 PM
      > Subject: Re: [The_Yurt_Community] Temp expectations
      >
      > Hi Tim,
      >
      > your yurt scene seemed to be idyllic. Being European
      > we use the centigrade measurement here, can you
      > remind
      > me what the freezing point is in farhenheit, because
      > I
      > probably forgot that a few days after I was taught
      > it
      > in school.
      >
      > Happy New Year
      > Jean
      >
      > --- timd02806 <timd02806@yahoo. com> wrote:
      >
      > > Well I went up to VT to be with my yurt friday and
      > > had a wonderful
      > > experience. First off, it was in fine shape since
      > > leaving it
      > > Thanksgiving. There was a blanket of snow in the
      > > Northeast kingdom and
      > > it was cool seeing my yurt in white for the first
      > > time. A gentle snow
      > > fell overnight and through most of saturday.
      > Friday
      > > night the temps
      > > fell to -1 F. Inside the yurt my woodstove
      > struggled
      > > to keep the temp
      > > at 35 F but I was warm in my bed. Come daybreak
      > the
      > > yurt warmed up to a
      > > cozy 60 F with the outside temp being 15 F. My
      > yurt
      > > is 24' in diameter,
      > > and currently has no fan to circulate air which
      > > might improve things. I
      > > do have reflectix on the roof and walls but there
      > > are a number of
      > > windows in the yurt that aren't insulated. I also
      > > feel yurts, by nature
      > > are not very tight structures that therefore allow
      > > cold air to
      > > penetrate.
      > > Do these temps seem consistant with other's
      > > experience? Thanks, Tim
      > >
      > >
      >
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    • Timothy Dawes
      Hi Jean. Chris gave you the calculations so I won t repost them. Yeh, my yurt experience is definately more like winter camping than amything else. I ll use
      Message 2 of 12 , Jan 1, 2007
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        Hi Jean. Chris gave you the calculations so I won't repost them. Yeh, my yurt experience is definately more like winter camping than amything else. I'll use my yurt for daytrips to go snowshowing, cross country skiing, or just hang out in and enjoy the scenery. I'll save overnight stays for adventure! I'll try to put together a photo album as it its a pretty area.
        Where in Europe are you located? Tim

        Jean Damgaard <jean.weston@...> wrote:
        Hi Tim,

        your yurt scene seemed to be idyllic. Being European
        we use the centigrade measurement here, can you remind
        me what the freezing point is in farhenheit, because I
        probably forgot that a few days after I was taught it
        in school.

        Happy New Year
        Jean

        --- timd02806 <timd02806@yahoo. com> wrote:

        > Well I went up to VT to be with my yurt friday and
        > had a wonderful
        > experience. First off, it was in fine shape since
        > leaving it
        > Thanksgiving. There was a blanket of snow in the
        > Northeast kingdom and
        > it was cool seeing my yurt in white for the first
        > time. A gentle snow
        > fell overnight and through most of saturday. Friday
        > night the temps
        > fell to -1 F. Inside the yurt my woodstove struggled
        > to keep the temp
        > at 35 F but I was warm in my bed. Come daybreak the
        > yurt warmed up to a
        > cozy 60 F with the outside temp being 15 F. My yurt
        > is 24' in diameter,
        > and currently has no fan to circulate air which
        > might improve things. I
        > do have reflectix on the roof and walls but there
        > are a number of
        > windows in the yurt that aren't insulated. I also
        > feel yurts, by nature
        > are not very tight structures that therefore allow
        > cold air to
        > penetrate.
        > Do these temps seem consistant with other's
        > experience? Thanks, Tim
        >
        >

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      • Timothy Dawes
        Just put some photo s together under Tim and Bri s Yurt . Timothy Dawes wrote: Hi
        Message 3 of 12 , Jan 1, 2007
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          Just put some photo's together under "Tim and Bri's Yurt".

          Timothy Dawes <timd02806@...> wrote:
          Hi Jean. Chris gave you the calculations so I won't repost them. Yeh, my yurt experience is definately more like winter camping than amything else. I'll use my yurt for daytrips to go snowshowing, cross country skiing, or just hang out in and enjoy the scenery. I'll save overnight stays for adventure! I'll try to put together a photo album as it its a pretty area.
          Where in Europe are you located? Tim

          Jean Damgaard <jean.weston@ yahoo.com> wrote:
          Hi Tim,

          your yurt scene seemed to be idyllic. Being European
          we use the centigrade measurement here, can you remind
          me what the freezing point is in farhenheit, because I
          probably forgot that a few days after I was taught it
          in school.

          Happy New Year
          Jean

          --- timd02806 <timd02806@yahoo. com> wrote:

          > Well I went up to VT to be with my yurt friday and
          > had a wonderful
          > experience. First off, it was in fine shape since
          > leaving it
          > Thanksgiving. There was a blanket of snow in the
          > Northeast kingdom and
          > it was cool seeing my yurt in white for the first
          > time. A gentle snow
          > fell overnight and through most of saturday. Friday
          > night the temps
          > fell to -1 F. Inside the yurt my woodstove struggled
          > to keep the temp
          > at 35 F but I was warm in my bed. Come daybreak the
          > yurt warmed up to a
          > cozy 60 F with the outside temp being 15 F. My yurt
          > is 24' in diameter,
          > and currently has no fan to circulate air which
          > might improve things. I
          > do have reflectix on the roof and walls but there
          > are a number of
          > windows in the yurt that aren't insulated. I also
          > feel yurts, by nature
          > are not very tight structures that therefore allow
          > cold air to
          > penetrate.
          > Do these temps seem consistant with other's
          > experience? Thanks, Tim
          >
          >

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        • Jean Damgaard
          Hi Tim I live in Denmark, but come from England originaly, I ll be living in a yurt for 2 weeks, next year, in Scotland with a survival group I m in. Your yurt
          Message 4 of 12 , Jan 1, 2007
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            Hi Tim

            I live in Denmark, but come from England originaly,
            I'll be living in a yurt for 2 weeks, next year, in
            Scotland with a survival group I'm in.

            Your yurt is beautiful, light and airy, though your
            stove seems a little small to try and keep the cold at
            bay. What is it you're constructing in the middle of
            the yurt?

            HNY
            Jean


            --- Timothy Dawes <timd02806@...> wrote:

            > Just put some photo's together under "Tim and Bri's
            > Yurt".
            >
            > Timothy Dawes <timd02806@...> wrote:
            > Hi Jean.
            > Chris gave you the calculations so I won't repost
            > them. Yeh, my yurt experience is definately more
            > like winter camping than amything else. I'll use my
            > yurt for daytrips to go snowshowing, cross country
            > skiing, or just hang out in and enjoy the scenery.
            > I'll save overnight stays for adventure! I'll try
            > to put together a photo album as it its a pretty
            > area.
            > Where in Europe are you located? Tim
            >
            > Jean Damgaard <jean.weston@...> wrote:
            > Hi Tim,
            >
            > your yurt scene seemed to be idyllic. Being
            > European
            > we use the centigrade measurement here, can you
            > remind
            > me what the freezing point is in farhenheit,
            > because I
            > probably forgot that a few days after I was taught
            > it
            > in school.
            >
            > Happy New Year
            > Jean
            >
            > --- timd02806 <timd02806@...> wrote:
            >
            > > Well I went up to VT to be with my yurt friday
            > and
            > > had a wonderful
            > > experience. First off, it was in fine shape
            > since
            > > leaving it
            > > Thanksgiving. There was a blanket of snow in the
            > > Northeast kingdom and
            > > it was cool seeing my yurt in white for the
            > first
            > > time. A gentle snow
            > > fell overnight and through most of saturday.
            > Friday
            > > night the temps
            > > fell to -1 F. Inside the yurt my woodstove
            > struggled
            > > to keep the temp
            > > at 35 F but I was warm in my bed. Come daybreak
            > the
            > > yurt warmed up to a
            > > cozy 60 F with the outside temp being 15 F. My
            > yurt
            > > is 24' in diameter,
            > > and currently has no fan to circulate air which
            > > might improve things. I
            > > do have reflectix on the roof and walls but
            > there
            > > are a number of
            > > windows in the yurt that aren't insulated. I
            > also
            > > feel yurts, by nature
            > > are not very tight structures that therefore
            > allow
            > > cold air to
            > > penetrate.
            > > Do these temps seem consistant with other's
            > > experience? Thanks, Tim
            > >
            > >
            >
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            >
            >
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            > protection around
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            >
            >
            >
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          • Timothy Dawes
            That s a platform used as a scaffold while constructing the yurt. The pictures were taken in October when we were putting it up. The platform will eventually
            Message 5 of 12 , Jan 1, 2007
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              That's a platform used as a scaffold while constructing the yurt. The pictures were taken in October when we were putting it up. The platform will eventually come down (but not until I'm comfortable with not needing to use it). I wasn't sure how to size a stove for the yurt. The one I have is supposed to manage a living space of 1,000 square feet. My yurt is 450sq ft but has a vaulted ceiling that is 15 feet high at it's peek. A bigger stove might help. Happy New Year to you to. Tim

              Jean Damgaard <jean.weston@...> wrote:
              Hi Tim

              I live in Denmark, but come from England originaly,
              I'll be living in a yurt for 2 weeks, next year, in
              Scotland with a survival group I'm in.

              Your yurt is beautiful, light and airy, though your
              stove seems a little small to try and keep the cold at
              bay. What is it you're constructing in the middle of
              the yurt?

              HNY
              Jean

              --- Timothy Dawes <timd02806@yahoo. com> wrote:

              > Just put some photo's together under "Tim and Bri's
              > Yurt".
              >
              > Timothy Dawes <timd02806@yahoo. com> wrote:
              > Hi Jean.
              > Chris gave you the calculations so I won't repost
              > them. Yeh, my yurt experience is definately more
              > like winter camping than amything else. I'll use my
              > yurt for daytrips to go snowshowing, cross country
              > skiing, or just hang out in and enjoy the scenery.
              > I'll save overnight stays for adventure! I'll try
              > to put together a photo album as it its a pretty
              > area.
              > Where in Europe are you located? Tim
              >
              > Jean Damgaard <jean.weston@ yahoo.com> wrote:
              > Hi Tim,
              >
              > your yurt scene seemed to be idyllic. Being
              > European
              > we use the centigrade measurement here, can you
              > remind
              > me what the freezing point is in farhenheit,
              > because I
              > probably forgot that a few days after I was taught
              > it
              > in school.
              >
              > Happy New Year
              > Jean
              >
              > --- timd02806 <timd02806@yahoo. com> wrote:
              >
              > > Well I went up to VT to be with my yurt friday
              > and
              > > had a wonderful
              > > experience. First off, it was in fine shape
              > since
              > > leaving it
              > > Thanksgiving. There was a blanket of snow in the
              > > Northeast kingdom and
              > > it was cool seeing my yurt in white for the
              > first
              > > time. A gentle snow
              > > fell overnight and through most of saturday.
              > Friday
              > > night the temps
              > > fell to -1 F. Inside the yurt my woodstove
              > struggled
              > > to keep the temp
              > > at 35 F but I was warm in my bed. Come daybreak
              > the
              > > yurt warmed up to a
              > > cozy 60 F with the outside temp being 15 F. My
              > yurt
              > > is 24' in diameter,
              > > and currently has no fan to circulate air which
              > > might improve things. I
              > > do have reflectix on the roof and walls but
              > there
              > > are a number of
              > > windows in the yurt that aren't insulated. I
              > also
              > > feel yurts, by nature
              > > are not very tight structures that therefore
              > allow
              > > cold air to
              > > penetrate.
              > > Do these temps seem consistant with other's
              > > experience? Thanks, Tim
              > >
              > >
              >
              > ____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ __
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              > protection around
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              >
              >
              > ____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ __
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              > protection around
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              >
              >
              >
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              > protection around
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            • Jean Damgaard
              Hi Tim, I thought you where building a girls room in the middle of the yurt, because it looked about the right size for a toilet!! I was looking at your fotos
              Message 6 of 12 , Jan 2, 2007
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                Hi Tim,
                I thought you where building a girls room in the
                middle of the yurt, because it looked about the right
                size for a toilet!! I was looking at your fotos
                again, your yurt looks a really good size, if you got
                the heating comforable, would you be able to live in
                it year round (you might be able to now, but for me
                those temps would be terrible)? Where did you buy it
                (sorry if you've already stated this earlier). Do you
                have any more interior fotos, kitchen area etc?

                Happy camping
                Jean
                --- Timothy Dawes <timd02806@...> wrote:

                > That's a platform used as a scaffold while
                > constructing the yurt. The pictures were taken in
                > October when we were putting it up. The platform
                > will eventually come down (but not until I'm
                > comfortable with not needing to use it). I wasn't
                > sure how to size a stove for the yurt. The one I
                > have is supposed to manage a living space of 1,000
                > square feet. My yurt is 450sq ft but has a vaulted
                > ceiling that is 15 feet high at it's peek. A bigger
                > stove might help. Happy New Year to you to. Tim


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              • thorkatlamana
                Tim, that is a great looking yurt. The position in the landscape is very nice. I heat with wood and have for many years in a climate a lot warmer than where
                Message 7 of 12 , Jan 2, 2007
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                  Tim, that is a great looking yurt. The position in the landscape is
                  very nice. I heat with wood and have for many years in a climate a
                  lot warmer than where you are, and to coin a phrase..."you gotta get a
                  bigger stove".
                  In the case of stoves....bigger is better.
                  How did the installation go with the spirit mountain yurt?
                  Also, are you pleased with the amount of room in the 24 footer or does
                  it seem very roomy or do you regret not getting a 30 footer?
                  Thanks,
                  Christina
                  www.funkychickenartproject.com
                • Timothy Dawes
                  We wanted a 30 footer but were advised against it by our yurt maker because of possible snow load problems since we were not going to be living in it (to
                  Message 8 of 12 , Jan 2, 2007
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                    We wanted a 30 footer but were advised against it by our yurt maker because of possible snow load problems since we were not going to be living in it (to regularly brush off snow accumulations). I think the 24 footer will be fine but that remains to be seen, however, because the yurt is not really "fitted out yet" i.e., no kitchen etc. Right now it is pretty much an open area with a futon couple of chairs in front of the stove and a futon bed. I don't have a cooking area (usually go out for a bite to eat) and have a porta potty over in a corner. It's still pretty "primitive" but I love it.
                    In terms of installation, since I never put up another yurt I have nothing to compare it to. The directions supplied by my yurtmaker lacked graphics or drawings which would have helped (picture is worth a thousand words). I shared this with the maker and she seems responsive to improving them.

                    thorkatlamana <funkchic@...> wrote:
                    Tim, that is a great looking yurt. The position in the landscape is
                    very nice. I heat with wood and have for many years in a climate a
                    lot warmer than where you are, and to coin a phrase..."you gotta get a
                    bigger stove".
                    In the case of stoves....bigger is better.
                    How did the installation go with the spirit mountain yurt?
                    Also, are you pleased with the amount of room in the 24 footer or does
                    it seem very roomy or do you regret not getting a 30 footer?
                    Thanks,
                    Christina
                    www.funkychickenart project.com


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                  • couture_x
                    Nice yurt, Tim. We have a 30 , 20 and 14 . The 14 is on its second year using wood heat, it stays warm but we have to keep after it as wood heat is
                    Message 9 of 12 , Jan 2, 2007
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                      Nice yurt, Tim.

                      We have a 30', 20' and 14'. The 14' is on its second year using wood
                      heat, it stays warm but we have to keep after it as wood heat is
                      generally inconsistent. Snow hasn't been a problem at all in the 14',
                      I suspect there's just enough heat loss to keep from getting buildup.
                      Manufacturer instructions say to avoid having more than 12" build
                      up, hasn't been a problem so far. Now, the 30' and 20' are still
                      under construction and have no heat, so we'll see what happens when we
                      do get some snow down here in Southern Vermont.

                      We have a ton of pics to put on our web site, will post a message when
                      I get caught up.

                      Happy New Yurt...I mean Year!

                      Chris

                      --- In The_Yurt_Community@yahoogroups.com, Timothy Dawes
                      <timd02806@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > We wanted a 30 footer but were advised against it by our yurt maker
                      because of possible snow load problems since we were not going to be
                      living in it (to regularly brush off snow accumulations). I think the
                      24 footer will be fine but that remains to be seen, however, because
                      the yurt is not really "fitted out yet" i.e., no kitchen etc. Right
                      now it is pretty much an open area with a futon couple of chairs in
                      front of the stove and a futon bed. I don't have a cooking area
                      (usually go out for a bite to eat) and have a porta potty over in a
                      corner. It's still pretty "primitive" but I love it.
                      > In terms of installation, since I never put up another yurt I have
                      nothing to compare it to. The directions supplied by my yurtmaker
                      lacked graphics or drawings which would have helped (picture is worth
                      a thousand words). I shared this with the maker and she seems
                      responsive to improving them.
                      >
                      > thorkatlamana <funkchic@...> wrote:
                      > Tim, that is a great looking yurt. The position in the
                      landscape is
                      > very nice. I heat with wood and have for many years in a climate a
                      > lot warmer than where you are, and to coin a phrase..."you gotta get a
                      > bigger stove".
                      > In the case of stoves....bigger is better.
                      > How did the installation go with the spirit mountain yurt?
                      > Also, are you pleased with the amount of room in the 24 footer or does
                      > it seem very roomy or do you regret not getting a 30 footer?
                      > Thanks,
                      > Christina
                      > www.funkychickenartproject.com
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > __________________________________________________
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