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  • Rob
    Hi, I just joined. My name is Rob and I have tons of old vinal records, both LP s and 45 s and want to figure out to convert them over to CD s. I have a
    Message 1 of 4 , May 20, 2009
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      Hi, I just joined. My name is Rob and I have tons of old vinal records, both LP's and 45's and want to figure out to convert them over to CD's. I have a Califone Pro Dance redord player and need to know what software is needed to copy the sound files and put it on a CD.
    • rabbithowling
      ... The easiest (and cheapest, because it s free) is to download a copy of the Audacity program.
      Message 2 of 4 , May 21, 2009
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        --- In TheVinylSolutionDiscussionGroup@yahoogroups.com, "Rob" <ky_2i0@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi, I just joined. My name is Rob and I have tons of old vinyl records, both LPs and 45s and want to figure out to convert them over to CDs. I have a Califone Pro Dance record player and need to know what software is needed to copy the sound files and put it on a CD.
        >
        The easiest (and cheapest, because it's free) is to download a copy of the Audacity program.
      • vlmagister
        Good morning Rob: I find myself in the mood to write this morning so here is an answer to your querry. It s probably a broader answer than you want, but here
        Message 3 of 4 , May 21, 2009
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          Good morning Rob:

          I find myself in the mood to write this morning so here is an answer to your
          querry. It's probably a broader answer than you want, but here goes.

          Converting vinyl into computer files (MP3, WAV, AAC , FLAC, etc) can be
          either a simple or very complex process depending upon quite a few factors:
          1: Your goals - how do you want these files to sound? Do you want the files
          to match or exceed the sound quality and clarity of a modern, well mastered
          CD (possible but difficult) or do you just want to hear the music without
          regard to matching the quality of current recording techniques?
          2: The original source material; is it well cared for or were your records
          used for third base?
          3: Your resources; how much are you willing to spend to convert these files?

          There are many other factors also, but those are probably the main ones.

          I don't know the sonic characteristics of a Califone Pro Dance record player
          but will just assume that you find the sound adequate for your needs.
          People can spend huge amounts of money on turntables, This is not really
          required but there is an aqcceptable lower limit. The turntable must be:

          (1) ...as free of rumble and speed variation as possible. If not, you will
          hear these flaws every time you play the file.
          (2) ...equipped with an undamaged stylus that is properly aligned and
          capable of properly tracking the records you are playing.
          (3) ... electronically capable of sending out a clean analog signal.

          Lets assume you have that. If you had no turntable at all you could find
          dozens of (table / caqrtridge) combinations on Ebay that would fill these
          requirements for less than $150.00. You could spend much more but there is
          probably not a need to. For this purpose, you reach the point of
          diminishing returns very quickly.

          Your records: they need to be as clean as possible. Once again, you don't
          need anything exotic to get your records clean. Also, there are a huge
          number of myths surrounding the cleaning of records. My perception of the
          need for cleaning records is as follows:

          (1) ... Records are delicate things, but nowhere near as delicate as some
          would lead you to believe. You can use a number of gentle mechanical
          methods to clean them without fear of damage, or further damage.
          (2) ...Wet cleaning is better. The best way I have found in cleaning
          records that are really old and dirty is with copious amounts of water (cold
          or slightly warm), a tiny drop of Dawn or some similar detergent and a
          shaving brush. Get the record wet, and use the shaving brush in a circular
          motion. Create a lot of suds. This wll help bind debris in the grooves.
          When you rinse them, rinse them for along time. You will get the cengter
          lable wet. Don't worry about that. The center lable is not glued to the
          record. It is presed into the record at the time the records are
          manufactured. Of the several thousand records I have cleaned this way there
          have only been two where the lable sustained any damage after it dried.
          (3) ...Let the record air dry and if required gently wipe it with a clean
          microfiber cloth.

          That's as clean as an old record will get. There will be some debris that
          has been impacted into the grooves. You'll never get rid of that. A clean
          record will be less noisy and reveal more of the original sound. I use a
          Nagaoka roller to clean records of dust prior to storing them.

          Now for the tricky part - going from the analog to the digital world. Once
          again there are many options as to how to do this. Here, in my experience
          one does need to spend some money and effort. It's a multiple step process:

          1: Phono signal preamplification: The signal that comes off a standard
          moving magnet cartridge is very weak - about 4 mV. What modern stereo
          equipment and souncards want to see is about 300 mV. This just means you
          will need some sort of preamplification to boost the signal. Once again,
          you can spend huge amounts of money but for digitizing there is really not a
          need to. Many older receivers, preamplifiers and integrated amplifiers have
          very good phone sections that will work very well. If you don't have one of
          these you can purchase a small phono preamp for less than 75 dollars. The
          best majority of human ears will hear no difference between a $75 preamp and
          a $5000 preamp.

          2: Ananlog to digital conversion: Regular human ears can hear differences
          in this step.

          Choice 1: Direct from preamp to computer sound card. Most modern PCs have
          sound capability integrated on the motherboard. Some have been implemented
          this well, most have not. Generally you will hear computer generated sound
          artifactcs if you go this route on most PCs. Most Apple machines have very
          good ADC. The way to overcome the issue is to get a decent soundcard.
          Remember, the goal here is to digitize the signal coming off a record, not
          to hear the bones of the monster you are killng crunch and crack in surround
          sound. You want a clean and quiet signal. My favorite for this sort of
          conversion is the M-Audio audiophile 2496, about 95 dollars at Amazon. It's
          very quiet, and does a great job of analog conversion.

          Choice 2: From phono preamp to an external sound device, either USB or
          firewire. This is becoming a more attractive option as there are some
          fairly inexpensive devices that will do decent conversion. The Behringer
          U-CONTROL UCA202 USB RCA Connector Audio
          Interface<http://www.lpgear.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=LG&Product_Code=BEHRUCA202&Category_Code=C2D>
          is rebranded at a higher price by other companies and does a good job. It
          records, in my view at the upper quality limit of what most people can
          hear. It's outside the noisy internal environment of the computer, so it
          creates clean files.

          Choice 3: Bypass the computer completely. There are a number of flash
          memory based portable recorders that do excellent analog to digital
          conversion (ADC.) They have the advantage of being extremely quiet. My
          favorite for vinyl conversion is the Yamaha Pocketrak 2G. There are more
          expensive ones but for the purpose of vinyl conversion it is good enough.
          Also, there are direct to CD recording devices, but these tend to be either
          cheap and clunky, or expensive and wonderful.

          Regardless of how you get the file into the computer, you will have a file
          that needs some manipulation. There are a great many choices in this, and
          Audacity is a good one. It's free, fast and fairly capable. It's not very
          good at removing noise without also removing music. Some other choices for
          recording and file manipulation are:

          High End:

          Sony Sound Forge or Sound Forge Studio
          Adobe Audition
          Steinberg Wavelab

          Low End:
          http://audio-editing-software-review.toptenreviews.com/
          Audacity

          Any of them mare quite capable of dealing with the files. The big issue for
          most people comes down to how aggressively you want to try to remove pops
          and clicks. The problem is, most software that is designed to do this also
          removes a good portion of the music. I think the current winner in terms of
          quality output, control and cost is SoundSoap as it gives you real time
          control and you can hear exactly what is being lost.

          This is a lot more than I thought I would write, but I think it does give a
          good overview.

          VL








          On Wed, May 20, 2009 at 10:16 PM, Rob <ky_2i0@...> wrote:

          >
          >
          > Hi, I just joined. My name is Rob and I have tons of old vinal records,
          > both LP's and 45's and want to figure out to convert them over to CD's. I
          > have a Califone Pro Dance redord player and need to know what software is
          > needed to copy the sound files and put it on a CD.
          >
          >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • jomperez@optonline.net
          Welcome! You can try out Audacity. It s free and the developers keeping adding features. ... From: Rob Date: Thursday, May 21, 2009 2:46 am Subject:
          Message 4 of 4 , May 22, 2009
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            Welcome! You can try out Audacity. It's free and the developers keeping adding features.

            ----- Original Message -----
            From: Rob
            Date: Thursday, May 21, 2009 2:46 am
            Subject: [TheVinylSolutionDiscussionGroup] Intro
            To: TheVinylSolutionDiscussionGroup@yahoogroups.com

            > Hi, I just joined. My name is Rob and I have tons of old vinal
            > records, both LP's and 45's and want to figure out to convert
            > them over to CD's. I have a Califone Pro Dance redord player
            > and need to know what software is needed to copy the sound files
            > and put it on a CD.
            >
            >


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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