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Re: Sin In The Bible

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  • patparso
    Actually there is a very good purpose for the word sin I think. A special word to designate something that is more serious than the average mistake. Cutting a
    Message 1 of 3 , Jul 13 6:56 AM
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      Actually there is a very good purpose for the word sin I think. A special word to designate something that is more serious than the average mistake. Cutting a piece of board too short would not be the same category of mistake as stealing.


      --- In TheTrueCommunity@yahoogroups.com, rinahshal@... wrote:
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      > Sin In The Bible  
      > Are we really sinners or do we just make mistakes?
      > One of the most commonly mistranslated Hebrew words is chait, which we usually see translated as "sin" and that's because in Hebrew, there is no word for sin. The Biblical word "Chet" appears in reference to an arrow which "missed the target." The archer is not "bad." Rather, he made a mistake - due to a lack of focus, concentration or skill.  
      > Sin is one of those words we tend to find repellant. Many of us grew up in non-Jewish societies and as a result of that influence we think of sin as some horrible evil, connected with endless guilt, eternal damnation and a host of other associations that are equally unpalatable.
      > Does chait really mean that?
      > The meaning of the word is usually defined by the context of how it is used. So for example, in Judges 20:16, slingers from the tribe of Benjamin are described as being so good with their weapon that they can "aim at a hair and not chait."
      > Could this mean to "aim at a hair and not sin"? It makes no sense. Obviously the text means to aim at a hair and not "miss," i.e. not to hit off target.
      > Another example is in I Kings 1:21. King David is on his death bed and his wife, Bathsheba, comes to him and says, "If Solomon does not become king after you then Solomon and I will be chataim." Solomon and Bathsheba will be sinners? It means that Solomon and Bathsheba will not reach their potential, will not make the grade, will not measure up.
      > A third example: The Hebrew for one of the many sacrificial offering is chatot, from the same root as the word chait. This offering -- called in English a "sin offering" -- can only be brought for something done unintentionally. In fact, if a person purposely committed a violation, he is forbidden to bring a chatot. It is truly a "mistake offering" rather than a "sin offering."
      > "Off target," "not reaching the mark," "mistake," and "unintentional" are all indications that the word chait does not mean "sin." A more accurate translation of the Hebrew chait is "error" or "mistake." People don't "sin." People make mistakes. After all, we are human. And the Jewish way is to learn from our mistakes, apologize, clean up any mess and move on with life.
      > Of course, there can be real ramifications to our mistakes. If a glass of milk is dropped, the milk is gone and the glass is shattered. So what do we do?
      > We deal with the fallout and fix what we can. Our amends may include a sincere apology, removing the shards, getting the carpet cleaned and buying a new bottle of milk. But we do not become steeped in guilt over our "sin."
      > Note that there are other words in Hebrew which are also mistranslated as "sin," but which convey a more serious misdeed than an error. To cite two examples: avon, refers to willful, knowing transgression of God's law where one's desires get the upper hand; pesha, refers to a willful transgression done specifically to spite God.
      > However, the most common word translated as "sin" is chait. The "sin" of Adam and Eve was chait, a mistake. So many of the concepts we may have in our minds may really not be Biblical at all. Taking a fresh look can give us great insights and clarity -- and tips to make our lives more meaningful.   
      >  
      > ~ Rabbi Shmuel Silinsky ~
      >
    • Yehochanan Bey
      Shalom Patparso, The problem with the translation of the word sin­—as shown in the article—is that it is too broad.  As the article points out, there are
      Message 2 of 3 , Jul 13 12:01 PM
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        Shalom Patparso,

        The problem with the translation of the word sin­as shown in the article—is that it is too broad.  As the article points out, there are many types of transgression in the Torah. Some types are done with the body and other with the mind.  Some types are intentional and others are unintentional.  So, it is important to note the different words because the Torah (and the New Testament) makes a distinction among the various transgressions.

        For instance, there is no forgiveness in the Torah or New Testament for intentional sins.  The New Testament—in particular—speaks of the unintentional sins that are due to our ignorance or lack of spiritual attainment.  For instance, it is a crime to covet another person’s wife.  There may be a married woman who works with us who is very beautiful and spiritual.  Naturally, a man wants a woman like that especially if he is still single or if his current wife is an unbeliever.  So, that crime is committed unintentionally because of lack of spiritual degree or ignorance.  Even though he has never made a pass at her, he has already sinned in his heart.  These are the crimes that the blood of Yeshua covers.  Yet, there is no forgiveness for a rapist.  Sure, can repent and attain salvation.  But, he will pay for that crime with his physical death (not eternal damnation). My point is that this is not clear why the put the word, sin, sin, sin, sin, sin, everywhere.

        This is why I like the Aramaic Peshitta.  Since Greek is not a scriptural language, it does not have all of the religious terms of the Torah.  So, the translations based on the Greek will care over that shortcoming.  Aramaic—like Amharic and Arabic—is close to Hebrew and contains every word in of the Torah.  things like this are clear in the Peshitta.  The way to get around the inadequacy of the Greek and English languages is by studying the Torah.  Then, the person will be able to tell by context the actually meaning of the word they translated as sin.

        I also want to correct the article on one point.  And, as you said, all categories of transgression fit this word.   The word, chet, does means to miss the mark.  That is correct.  But, it can mean both intentional and unintentional sins.  The Torah clearly gives the context of the word each time.  Here is an example.

        Lev 4:2  Speak unto the children of Israel, saying, If a soul shall sin through inadvertence against any of the commandments of Jehovah in things that ought not to be done, and do any of them;

        If chet (sin) automatically means unintentional sin or just missing the mark, it would not have added the phrase, "by inadvertence".  So, when the Torah uses the word alone, we know the context because it already gave the context of being by inadvertence.  Not need to repeat that phrase.

        So, any missing of the mark (of devotion to the Creator) is a chet/sin. It is up to us to learn the meaning of each type of sin in the Torah.  The interlinear resources are good for that.  This is important because—when we study the concept of sin in the New Testament—we will no do as the Christians and think the Yeshua atones for all crimes.  That is a lie.  He only atoned for the crimes stated in the Torah since he came to fulfill the Torah.  If he came to fulfill anything else, it would be written.  And the Torah only gives remedies for unintentional sins and certain minor intentional sins like stealing.  There is no sacrifice for things like rape or adultery.

        Shalom,

        Yehochanan

         

        --- On Mon, 7/13/09, patparso <parspe@...> wrote:

        From: patparso <parspe@...>
        Subject: [TheTrueCommunity] Re: Sin In The Bible
        To: TheTrueCommunity@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Monday, July 13, 2009, 9:56 AM

        Actually there is a very good purpose for the word sin I think. A special word to designate something that is more serious than the average mistake. Cutting a piece of board too short would not be the same category of mistake as stealing.

        --- In TheTrueCommunity@ yahoogroups. com, rinahshal@.. . wrote:
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Sin In The Bible  
        > Are we really sinners or do we just make mistakes?
        > One of the most commonly mistranslated Hebrew words is chait, which we usually see translated as "sin" and that's because in Hebrew, there is no word for sin. The Biblical word "Chet" appears in reference to an arrow which "missed the target." The archer is not "bad." Rather, he made a mistake - due to a lack of focus, concentration or skill.  
        > Sin is one of those words we tend to find repellant. Many of us grew up in non-Jewish societies and as a result of that influence we think of sin as some horrible evil, connected with endless guilt, eternal damnation and a host of other associations that are equally unpalatable.
        > Does chait really mean that?
        > The meaning of the word is usually defined by the context of how it is used. So for example, in Judges 20:16, slingers from the tribe of Benjamin are described as being so good with their weapon that they can "aim at a hair and not chait."
        > Could this mean to "aim at a hair and not sin"? It makes no sense. Obviously the text means to aim at a hair and not "miss," i.e. not to hit off target.
        > Another example is in I Kings 1:21. King David is on his death bed and his wife, Bathsheba, comes to him and says, "If Solomon does not become king after you then Solomon and I will be chataim." Solomon and Bathsheba will be sinners? It means that Solomon and Bathsheba will not reach their potential, will not make the grade, will not measure up.
        > A third example: The Hebrew for one of the many sacrificial offering is chatot, from the same root as the word chait. This offering -- called in English a "sin offering" -- can only be brought for something done unintentionally. In fact, if a person purposely committed a violation, he is forbidden to bring a chatot. It is truly a "mistake offering" rather than a "sin offering."
        > "Off target," "not reaching the mark," "mistake," and "unintentional" are all indications that the word chait does not mean "sin." A more accurate translation of the Hebrew chait is "error" or "mistake." People don't "sin." People make mistakes. After all, we are human. And the Jewish way is to learn from our mistakes, apologize, clean up any mess and move on with life.
        > Of course, there can be real ramifications to our mistakes. If a glass of milk is dropped, the milk is gone and the glass is shattered. So what do we do?
        > We deal with the fallout and fix what we can. Our amends may include a sincere apology, removing the shards, getting the carpet cleaned and buying a new bottle of milk. But we do not become steeped in guilt over our "sin."
        > Note that there are other words in Hebrew which are also mistranslated as "sin," but which convey a more serious misdeed than an error. To cite two examples: avon, refers to willful, knowing transgression of God's law where one's desires get the upper hand; pesha, refers to a willful transgression done specifically to spite God.
        > However, the most common word translated as "sin" is chait. The "sin" of Adam and Eve was chait, a mistake. So many of the concepts we may have in our minds may really not be Biblical at all. Taking a fresh look can give us great insights and clarity -- and tips to make our lives more meaningful.   
        >  
        > ~ Rabbi Shmuel Silinsky ~
        >


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