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Re: A promise of salvation: A theory of religion

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  • ParthaK
    His theory of religion is that religion is anything that involves interventionist practices . Any practice that aims at establishing contact with superhuman
    Message 1 of 3 , Jan 1, 2012
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      His theory of religion is that religion is anything that involves "interventionist practices". Any practice that aims at establishing contact with superhuman powers.

      Balu has already addressed this 'definition'/'idea' in his book and yet he cites balu's work. Maybe he didn't read through balu's work in detail?


      --- In TheHeathenInHisBlindness@yahoogroups.com, Kranthikeshvara K <kranthikesvara@...> wrote:
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      > He has cited Balu's work in the first chapter. 
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      > --- On Sat, 31/12/11, ParthaK <partha_kaushik@...> wrote:
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      > From: ParthaK <partha_kaushik@...>
      > Subject: [TheHeathenInHisBlindness] A promise of salvation: A theory of religion
      > To: TheHeathenInHisBlindness@yahoogroups.com
      > Date: Saturday, 31 December, 2011, 9:24 PM
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      > A guy named Martin Riesebrodt has written this book "A Promise of Salvation: A theory of religion", in which he makes reference to "The Heathen" and basically disagrees with Balu's hypothesis that religion is not a cultural universal.
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      > Book Description:
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      > Martin Riesebrodt here undertakes a task that is at once simple and monumental: to define, understand, and explain religion as a universal concept.
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      > Instead of propounding abstract theories, Riesebrodt concentrates on the concrete realities of worship, examining religious holidays, conversion stories, prophetic visions, and life-cycle events. In analyzing these practices, his scope is appropriately broad, taking into consideration traditions in Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, Daoism, and Shinto. Ultimately, Riesebrodt argues, all religions promise to avert misfortune, help their followers manage crises, and bring both temporary blessings and eternal salvation. And, as The Promise of Salvation makes clear through abundant empirical evidence, religion will not disappear as long as these promises continue to help people cope with life.
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      > http://www.amazon.com/Promise-Salvation-Theory-Religion/dp/0226713911
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