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You're all wet, and other niceties of getting ready to cruise...

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  • Skip Gundlach
    By the time you read this, we ll have been on the ground here in St. Pete s Salt Creek Marina for two and a half years. In two weeks we ll have had someone -
    Message 1 of 2 , Oct 7, 2006
      By the time you read this, we'll have been on the ground here in St. Pete's Salt Creek Marina for two and a half years.  In two weeks we'll have had someone - or several someones - working on the boat for exactly 2 years, not counting the many times I was unable to be here, when, for the most part, work stopped.  However, in that time, unexpected, awesome changes have occurred to the prior Sailing Yacht Tehamana as it became our home, the Flying Pig.

      We started out expecting very simple things - a minor operation to determine that my shoulder was never going to be better than it was, or a few slices to unhook scar tissue preventing full movement, followed by minimal physical therapy - and a couple of pretty simple carpentry projects, as the boat was in fine nick when we bought it and sailed it through extremely rough weather for 500 miles to get it here.  We expected to set sail in November, two years ago.

      The shoulder turned out to be not very simple; in short, not only did the first operation fail entirely, and the muscles not attach to the remainder of the shoulder bone, the second operation was undone by an infection, necessitating muscle relocation (to substitute for those now unattached) a year later.  Those operations and their associated therapies cost me close to a year (in two different recovery times) on (well, technically, off) the boat - but it allowed more to be done, as the time was forced upon us (therapy) and Lydia was able to continue her income generation, paying for the unexpected work which has been done.  In between therapies, I've been working on the boat full time for that period.

      The couple of carpentry projects turned out to be not very simple either ... 

      ... An expected new countertop on both sides, replacing the sink, and adding insulation to the refrigeration turned out to be an entire rebuild of the galley (marine kitchen). The new sink and faucet were improved by a new pump and plumbing for the fresh water, and a pressure salt water wash, to preserve fresh water when we're doing the dishes.  Unexpectedly, and taking well over a month more than we'd possibly imagined just to get to that point, the old refrigerator and gear had to be sawed out.  In the end, however, we've got a totally marvelous, mega-insulated refrigerator and freezer, built from the ground up, bulkheads in, and top down, with electronic thermostatic controls which will allow us to maintain temperatures to within 1/2 degree in each of the freezer and refrigerator compartments.  Inside, air will constantly circulate with microfans, and when the door opens, LED lighting will show the way at the same time the fans are turned off, courtesy of a three-way magnetic switch.  All the insulation we carefully cut, epoxied, overlaid, installed and fiberglassed will keep the exterior of the box at room temperature, and our mechanical portion will very efficiently work off the 12 volts system we have designed as part of the other work.  We also remedied all the rot found under the refrigerator and in the engine room, where the other gear was removed. 

      ... An expected simple extension of the platform on which our bed was placed, and a step up to it with storage built into it morphed into a total redo of the bed.  It's now the best sleeping we've ever done, anywhere, new storage access under the bed was devised and built, and the woodwork and paint everywhere in the aft cabin was refinished. 

      ... The addition of some storage in the walkthrough morphed into new brilliant fluorescent lighting over the workbench, backed up with red lighting on a three way switch, a mirrored panel, with red lighting behind it coming on when opened to access the bins giving us a hardware-store level of supplies along with the mirror reflecting light onto the workbench when it's down, and conversion of most of the closets to shelved storage with lighting which comes on when you open the door. 

      So much for a couple of minor carpentry projects!

      Those were all we expected to do (not counting all the extra improvements made to the original concepts).  However, a few other things crept in: 

      An arch was designed and executed in 2" stainless steel tube.  Integrated were the davits which have the dinghy up where we can see under it, rather than before, where it totally obscured the view to the stern. Also integrated were the two outboard motor mounts, the barbeque and tank mount, wind and solar power generation, satellite antenna (for gathering images from weather satellites in real time), GPS receiver, VHF and Ham/SSB antennas, and the emergency-related DSC antenna, along with a place to put our fish gaffs, trolling rigs, boat poles/hooks, life sling (overboard rescue system) and MOB (man over board) pole.  Under the arch is a swim, bathing, fishing and otherwise "patio" platform, along with a boarding ladder reachable from the water, with both salt and fresh water washdowns.

      An entire redo of the topsides started out as checking out the potential leaks ... 

      ... While we rebedded and caulked every single item and fastener which turned or somehow otherwise went through the deck, we also completely redid the toerail teak, rubrail (including stainless steel rub strake) and a few other minor things. 

      ... Wire lifelines and 24" stanchions gave way to 30" full 1" stainless steel railings and stanchions, electrically continuous to provide a better ground plane for the long-distance radio and integrated to the arch which also was altered to provide an offset aft entry so we wouldn't have to go around the backstay when we boarded from the stern, as was the case in the original design. 

      ... The stainless steel tubing stern ladder, which used to form a gate (until the prior davits made it impossible to raise the ladder to the deck level with the dinghy in the way, another reason for the arch-as-davits), was moved and altered to be a side boarding ladder, extended to allow a deeper water access, and enhanced by teak steps. 

      ... The prior windlass, in fine shape other than obviously not having been serviced in many years, resisted removal for service, so it had to be cut out.  However, in the end, not only do we have a new windlass and electronics to allow raising or lowering the anchor either on deck at the bow or at the helm, we also have new anchors, chain and rope rode (the line between the anchor and the boat), and a refitted and replumbed anchor locker. 

      ... The semiautomatic sail storage system, "Mack Pack," was renewed and awaits my splicing in another set of lines which guide the sail into the cover.

      ... Lydia's in the last stages of polishing all the opening ports and hatches, allowing light below where there used to be haze at best.  She's just finished the last of the refinishing of the sides of the boat, which had weathered badly in the years since it was repainted some time during a prior owner's time, all before we go in the water. Before that, she'd become a fiberglass wizard, repairing all the grinding we'd done in chasing the blisters and wet spots mentioned in the last Log entry.  Immediately after that, she became a bottom paint expert, applying approximately 3200 square feet of first blue (the reveal coat, showing when the top coat wears out) and then black ablative bottom paint.  Based on reports from other cruisers, we anticipate we may get 4 or 5 years out of this job - but we'll have to wait to see!

      Below, the nav station - my office - was also totally redesigned, with new Ham/SSB, VHF and AM/FM radios, autopilot, GPS, and emergency integration (flip a cover, hit the panic button, and an awful lot of people will know that I'm in trouble, and where I am - and when they respond, my radio immediately goes to that frequency so I can tell them what's up).

      Instead of it all being out in the open, with the accompanying rat's nest of wiring, we've put all the electronics into a panel which can drop for service, but otherwise present just the faces of the various gear.  The laptop computer, along with its navigation programs, has secure storage, along with a soon-to-come storage place for the accessories - a laser printer, three external drives (one for 500 movies, one for 300 Gigabytes of music, and the other for backups), the Vonage router which allows us same-number-I've-had-for-30-years telephone contact whenever we're in range of a wireless access point, and an electrical center which allows us to power each of these independently (so as to not use electricity, coming from our batteries, unnecessarily).  Our entertainment will be either audio or audio-visual; there's speakers in the bulkheads for general times, and new Bose on the side opposite where we'll sit to watch movies.  The aft cabin has separate speakers, and we've still got to figure out how to get the sound up to the cockpit, where we'll have it in exterior speakers.

      Also below, we've totally redone the plumbing for both heads (marine toilets and showers), so that the usual chore, every few years, of taking out really stinky hoses and replacing them with new, very expensive, special sanitation hose should be done forever, with, at most, very small connectors requiring replacement.  As we went, we've been replacing and/or adding lighting, with new red and amber LED lighting on three-way switches, for ambience and night vision protection, as appropriate, and new fluorescent energy efficient lighting.

      In the engine room, major changes occurred as well, with the removal of the generator, relocation of the batteries, replacing the ones which came with the boat with an installation of double the capacity, along with all the proper management tools for the wind and solar power generation on the arch, and the new refrigeration works.  Also in the engine room are the new pressure salt water feed, new shelving, and nearly complete rewiring of the entire boat (along with all the new stuff).  Bilge pumps, shower evacuation pumps, cockpit scuppers and everything else with a hose leading to the outside has been replumbed.  Just installed are the new drive shaft and all the associated hardware to go with it, including the self-reversing, auto-feathering propellor, accompanying the just-reinstalled and reversed (long story; the prop now turns clockwise for forward) transmission.  Still to come are the fuel polishing system (diesel fuel tends to get gummy and junky if not used a lot, as would be the case with a tractor-trailer engine, or a power boat, and our engine will be run very little), the dual filtration for the engine supply, and the various things which will go with the recommissioning of the diesel propulsion plant after the long layup.

      Outside, the last of many coats of ablative (wears off intentionally so one needn't sand off the paint when it's no longer doing its job) bottom paint has just gone on, and we're now in the slings.  That means that the Marine Travelift - the special tractor which moves boats - has come to pick us up, so we can finish the last few places we couldn't get to on the hull and under the keel while it sat on the ground and the stands.  Monday morning, we get wet - as close to 2.5 years since it came out as you can get without counting hours.  We'll have a wet slip next to the yard office, where we'll wait for the hull to resume its normal shape and we can then realign the engine and driveshaft.

      While we wait, we will continue to put away all the things we'll take with us, especially all the tools we've been using during our improvements.  We'll also do another 20 finishing-up projects, including the final adjustments to all the electrical and electronic stuff which we've put off until we're in the water.  That's a fair amount of work but, but it ought to go quickly.

      Not mentioned are the myriad smaller projects; it would take pages to tell you of all of them.  We know that there were many who thought we'd never see this day, including quite a few in this marina workyard.  However, here we are - and in a couple of weeks or so we'll begin our sailing trials to prove out all we've done, as well as see what may need fixing that wasn't on our huge list.

      For those of you who have been there, done that, you know how we feel.  Sold the houses (Lydia and I had separate homes for most of our marriage, as we lived 90 miles apart when we met; by the time we married we knew we'd be doing this so combining households at that point didn't make sense), sold the cars, gave away nearly everything else, and have most of what we'll take with us already aboard.  As long and hard as this journey has been, and as much frustration and anxiety over how it might take us forever there was, at this point, while we're very excited, it's more of just a natural next step.

      We'll hold a very smallish christening and launching ceremony Monday morning when the yard comes to retrieve their lift, get the boat wet, and then go right back to work.  However, in a couple of weeks or so, we'll be issuing calls for those who might like to go out on our sea trials. 

      Stay tuned!!

      If you'd like to see a few of the recent pictures which got us to this point, go to the Log List photo gallery, http://ph.groups.yahoo.com/group/TheFlyingPigLog/photos/browse/1821?c=   - and if you'd like to see thousands of pictures, from the beginning through today, go to our gallery and click on the refit icon; it will take you to others of the same sort from which you can choose.

      L8R

      Love from Skip and Lydia

      --
      Morgan 461 #2
      SV Flying Pig   KI4MPC
      See our galleries at www.justpickone.org/skip/gallery !
      Follow us at theflyingpiglog@yahoogroups.com and
      flyingpiglog@...

      "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you
      didn't do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail
      away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore.
      Dream. Discover."   - Mark Twain
    • Bill and Nancy Arnold
      Hi Skip & Lydia--Thanks for the up date!!! Sounds like you ae almost ready to set sail !! Congratulations!! Bill & Nancy Arnold Skip Gundlach
      Message 2 of 2 , Oct 8, 2006
        Hi Skip & Lydia--Thanks for the up date!!! Sounds like you ae "almost" ready to "set sail"!!  Congratulations!!  Bill & Nancy Arnold

        Skip Gundlach <skipgundlach@...> wrote:
        By the time you read this, we'll have been on the ground here in St. Pete's Salt Creek Marina for two and a half years.  In two weeks we'll have had someone - or several someones - working on the boat for exactly 2 years, not counting the many times I was unable to be here, when, for the most part, work stopped.  However, in that time, unexpected, awesome changes have occurred to the prior Sailing Yacht Tehamana as it became our home, the Flying Pig.

        We started out expecting very simple things - a minor operation to determine that my shoulder was never going to be better than it was, or a few slices to unhook scar tissue preventing full movement, followed by minimal physical therapy - and a couple of pretty simple carpentry projects, as the boat was in fine nick when we bought it and sailed it through extremely rough weather for 500 miles to get it here.  We expected to set sail in November, two years ago.

        The shoulder turned out to be not very simple; in short, not only did the first operation fail entirely, and the muscles not attach to the remainder of the shoulder bone, the second operation was undone by an infection, necessitating muscle relocation (to substitute for those now unattached) a year later.  Those operations and their associated therapies cost me close to a year (in two different recovery times) on (well, technically, off) the boat - but it allowed more to be done, as the time was forced upon us (therapy) and Lydia was able to continue her income generation, paying for the unexpected work which has been done.  In between therapies, I've been working on the boat full time for that period.

        The couple of carpentry projects turned out to be not very simple either ... 

        ... An expected new countertop on both sides, replacing the sink, and adding insulation to the refrigeration turned out to be an entire rebuild of the galley (marine kitchen). The new sink and faucet were improved by a new pump and plumbing for the fresh water, and a pressure salt water wash, to preserve fresh water when we're doing the dishes.  Unexpectedly, and taking well over a month more than we'd possibly imagined just to get to that point, the old refrigerator and gear had to be sawed out.  In the end, however, we've got a totally marvelous, mega-insulated refrigerator and freezer, built from the ground up, bulkheads in, and top down, with electronic thermostatic controls which will allow us to maintain temperatures to within 1/2 degree in each of the freezer and refrigerator compartments.  Inside, air will constantly circulate with microfans, and when the door opens, LED lighting will show the way at the same time the fans are turned off, courtesy of a three-way magnetic switch.  All the insulation we carefully cut, epoxied, overlaid, installed and fiberglassed will keep the exterior of the box at room temperature, and our mechanical portion will very efficiently work off the 12 volts system we have designed as part of the other work.  We also remedied all the rot found under the refrigerator and in the engine room, where the other gear was removed. 

        ... An expected simple extension of the platform on which our bed was placed, and a step up to it with storage built into it morphed into a total redo of the bed.  It's now the best sleeping we've ever done, anywhere, new storage access under the bed was devised and built, and the woodwork and paint everywhere in the aft cabin was refinished. 

        ... The addition of some storage in the walkthrough morphed into new brilliant fluorescent lighting over the workbench, backed up with red lighting on a three way switch, a mirrored panel, with red lighting behind it coming on when opened to access the bins giving us a hardware-store level of supplies along with the mirror reflecting light onto the workbench when it's down, and conversion of most of the closets to shelved storage with lighting which comes on when you open the door. 

        So much for a couple of minor carpentry projects!

        Those were all we expected to do (not counting all the extra improvements made to the original concepts).  However, a few other things crept in: 

        An arch was designed and executed in 2" stainless steel tube.  Integrated were the davits which have the dinghy up where we can see under it, rather than before, where it totally obscured the view to the stern. Also integrated were the two outboard motor mounts, the barbeque and tank mount, wind and solar power generation, satellite antenna (for gathering images from weather satellites in real time), GPS receiver, VHF and Ham/SSB antennas, and the emergency-related DSC antenna, along with a place to put our fish gaffs, trolling rigs, boat poles/hooks, life sling (overboard rescue system) and MOB (man over board) pole.  Under the arch is a swim, bathing, fishing and otherwise "patio" platform, along with a boarding ladder reachable from the water, with both salt and fresh water washdowns.

        An entire redo of the topsides started out as checking out the potential leaks ... 

        ... While we rebedded and caulked every single item and fastener which turned or somehow otherwise went through the deck, we also completely redid the toerail teak, rubrail (including stainless steel rub strake) and a few other minor things. 

        ... Wire lifelines and 24" stanchions gave way to 30" full 1" stainless steel railings and stanchions, electrically continuous to provide a better ground plane for the long-distance radio and integrated to the arch which also was altered to provide an offset aft entry so we wouldn't have to go around the backstay when we boarded from the stern, as was the case in the original design. 

        ... The stainless steel tubing stern ladder, which used to form a gate (until the prior davits made it impossible to raise the ladder to the deck level with the dinghy in the way, another reason for the arch-as-davits), was moved and altered to be a side boarding ladder, extended to allow a deeper water access, and enhanced by teak steps. 

        ... The prior windlass, in fine shape other than obviously not having been serviced in many years, resisted removal for service, so it had to be cut out.  However, in the end, not only do we have a new windlass and electronics to allow raising or lowering the anchor either on deck at the bow or at the helm, we also have new anchors, chain and rope rode (the line between the anchor and the boat), and a refitted and replumbed anchor locker. 

        ... The semiautomatic sail storage system, "Mack Pack," was renewed and awaits my splicing in another set of lines which guide the sail into the cover.

        ... Lydia's in the last stages of polishing all the opening ports and hatches, allowing light below where there used to be haze at best.  She's just finished the last of the refinishing of the sides of the boat, which had weathered badly in the years since it was repainted some time during a prior owner's time, all before we go in the water. Before that, she'd become a fiberglass wizard, repairing all the grinding we'd done in chasing the blisters and wet spots mentioned in the last Log entry.  Immediately after that, she became a bottom paint expert, applying approximately 3200 square feet of first blue (the reveal coat, showing when the top coat wears out) and then black ablative bottom paint.  Based on reports from other cruisers, we anticipate we may get 4 or 5 years out of this job - but we'll have to wait to see!

        Below, the nav station - my office - was also totally redesigned, with new Ham/SSB, VHF and AM/FM radios, autopilot, GPS, and emergency integration (flip a cover, hit the panic button, and an awful lot of people will know that I'm in trouble, and where I am - and when they respond, my radio immediately goes to that frequency so I can tell them what's up).

        Instead of it all being out in the open, with the accompanying rat's nest of wiring, we've put all the electronics into a panel which can drop for service, but otherwise present just the faces of the various gear.  The laptop computer, along with its navigation programs, has secure storage, along with a soon-to-come storage place for the accessories - a laser printer, three external drives (one for 500 movies, one for 300 Gigabytes of music, and the other for backups), the Vonage router which allows us same-number-I've-had-for-30-years telephone contact whenever we're in range of a wireless access point, and an electrical center which allows us to power each of these independently (so as to not use electricity, coming from our batteries, unnecessarily).  Our entertainment will be either audio or audio-visual; there's speakers in the bulkheads for general times, and new Bose on the side opposite where we'll sit to watch movies.  The aft cabin has separate speakers, and we've still got to figure out how to get the sound up to the cockpit, where we'll have it in exterior speakers.

        Also below, we've totally redone the plumbing for both heads (marine toilets and showers), so that the usual chore, every few years, of taking out really stinky hoses and replacing them with new, very expensive, special sanitation hose should be done forever, with, at most, very small connectors requiring replacement.  As we went, we've been replacing and/or adding lighting, with new red and amber LED lighting on three-way switches, for ambience and night vision protection, as appropriate, and new fluorescent energy efficient lighting.

        In the engine room, major changes occurred as well, with the removal of the generator, relocation of the batteries, replacing the ones which came with the boat with an installation of double the capacity, along with all the proper management tools for the wind and solar power generation on the arch, and the new refrigeration works.  Also in the engine room are the new pressure salt water feed, new shelving, and nearly complete rewiring of the entire boat (along with all the new stuff).  Bilge pumps, shower evacuation pumps, cockpit scuppers and everything else with a hose leading to the outside has been replumbed.  Just installed are the new drive shaft and all the associated hardware to go with it, including the self-reversing, auto-feathering propellor, accompanying the just-reinstalled and reversed (long story; the prop now turns clockwise for forward) transmission.  Still to come are the fuel polishing system (diesel fuel tends to get gummy and junky if not used a lot, as would be the case with a tractor-trailer engine, or a power boat, and our engine will be run very little), the dual filtration for the engine supply, and the various things which will go with the recommissioning of the diesel propulsion plant after the long layup.

        Outside, the last of many coats of ablative (wears off intentionally so one needn't sand off the paint when it's no longer doing its job) bottom paint has just gone on, and we're now in the slings.  That means that the Marine Travelift - the special tractor which moves boats - has come to pick us up, so we can finish the last few places we couldn't get to on the hull and under the keel while it sat on the ground and the stands.  Monday morning, we get wet - as close to 2.5 years since it came out as you can get without counting hours.  We'll have a wet slip next to the yard office, where we'll wait for the hull to resume its normal shape and we can then realign the engine and driveshaft.

        While we wait, we will continue to put away all the things we'll take with us, especially all the tools we've been using during our improvements.  We'll also do another 20 finishing-up projects, including the final adjustments to all the electrical and electronic stuff which we've put off until we're in the water.  That's a fair amount of work but, but it ought to go quickly.

        Not mentioned are the myriad smaller projects; it would take pages to tell you of all of them.  We know that there were many who thought we'd never see this day, including quite a few in this marina workyard.  However, here we are - and in a couple of weeks or so we'll begin our sailing trials to prove out all we've done, as well as see what may need fixing that wasn't on our huge list.

        For those of you who have been there, done that, you know how we feel.  Sold the houses (Lydia and I had separate homes for most of our marriage, as we lived 90 miles apart when we met; by the time we married we knew we'd be doing this so combining households at that point didn't make sense), sold the cars, gave away nearly everything else, and have most of what we'll take with us already aboard.  As long and hard as this journey has been, and as much frustration and anxiety over how it might take us forever there was, at this point, while we're very excited, it's more of just a natural next step.

        We'll hold a very smallish christening and launching ceremony Monday morning when the yard comes to retrieve their lift, get the boat wet, and then go right back to work.  However, in a couple of weeks or so, we'll be issuing calls for those who might like to go out on our sea trials. 

        Stay tuned!!

        If you'd like to see a few of the recent pictures which got us to this point, go to the Log List photo gallery, http://ph.groups.yahoo.com/group/TheFlyingPigLog/photos/browse/1821?c=   - and if you'd like to see thousands of pictures, from the beginning through today, go to our gallery and click on the refit icon; it will take you to others of the same sort from which you can choose.

        L8R

        Love from Skip and Lydia

        --
        Morgan 461 #2
        SV Flying Pig   KI4MPC
        See our galleries at www.justpickone.org/skip/gallery !
        Follow us at theflyingpiglog@yahoogroups.com and
        flyingpiglog@...

        "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you
        didn't do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail
        away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore.
        Dream. Discover."   - Mark Twain



        Bill and Nancy Arnold
        770-992-1509
        www.ngapianostudio.com


        Get your email and more, right on the new Yahoo.com

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