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Re: [TheCostumersManifesto] painting on fabric..

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  • Paula McWhirter-Buck
    a few years ago i took a workshop on fabric painting. the product that was used actually died the fibers, rather then laying on top of the fabric. it washed
    Message 1 of 5 , Nov 3, 2007
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      a few years ago i took a workshop on fabric painting.
      the product that was used actually died the fibers, rather then laying
      on top of the fabric. it washed up beautifully and didnt alter the
      fabric (didnt change the texture or movement of the fabric the way
      fabric paints do). even the best of the fabric paints i've used cause
      the fabric to get stiffer.

      anyway... this stuff can only be used on natural fibers (silk, cotton,
      etc.) but it gives the artist complete control.
      i've done a considerable amount of fabric painting and i've found that
      maintaining control of color is the hardest thing.

      so...the product is called Procion. it has to be mixed with a
      thickener, which is a mixture of chemicals. the thickener we used is
      called PRO Printmix, and comes from a company called PRO Chemical.
      none of this stuff is expensive, and can be found online. it mixes and
      goes on just like paint, but it's actually a dye.

      good luck with this project.

      brighest of blessings,
      paula mcwhirter-buck

      --- tuesdaycoren <tuesdaycoren@...> wrote:

      > HI!!
      >
      > Hope this question isn't too amateur...
      >
      > I was looking to have a Japanese sumi artist paint a bamboo motif on
      > some fabric to be turned into a dress....
      >
      > The background needs to be white....
      >
      > My question is: what kind of fabrics would you recommend?
      >
      > I didn't want to go with anything too light weight as this would be
      > the
      > bodice portion of the dress... I also didn't want the "paint" to run
      > too much..
      >
      > any help MUCH APPRECIATED :)
      >
      > ~tuesday hammerl
      >
      >


      "THE TIME HAS COME", THE WALRUS SAID,"TO TALK OF MANY THINGS.
      OF SHOES, AND SHIPS AND SEALING WAX, OF CABBAGES AND KINGS.
      AND WHY THE SEA IS BOILING HOT, AND WHETHER PIGS HAVE WINGS."

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    • Sylvia Rognstad
      It s Procion MX you want to use. There is Procion H too, which is not the right kind of dye. However, if you paint on silk, you can use silk dye-paints,
      Message 2 of 5 , Nov 3, 2007
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        It's Procion MX you want to use. There is Procion H too, which is not
        the right kind of dye. However, if you paint on silk, you can use silk
        dye-paints, which I think are already mixed up and therefore easier to
        use. They don't work on cellulose fibers though.

        Sylrog

        On Nov 3, 2007, at 1:51 PM, Paula McWhirter-Buck wrote:

        > a few years ago i took a workshop on fabric painting.
        > the product that was used actually died the fibers, rather then laying
        > on top of the fabric. it washed up beautifully and didnt alter the
        > fabric (didnt change the texture or movement of the fabric the way
        > fabric paints do). even the best of the fabric paints i've used cause
        > the fabric to get stiffer.
        >
        > anyway... this stuff can only be used on natural fibers (silk, cotton,
        > etc.) but it gives the artist complete control.
        > i've done a considerable amount of fabric painting and i've found that
        > maintaining control of color is the hardest thing.
        >
        > so...the product is called Procion. it has to be mixed with a
        > thickener, which is a mixture of chemicals. the thickener we used is
        > called PRO Printmix, and comes from a company called PRO Chemical.
        > none of this stuff is expensive, and can be found online. it mixes and
        > goes on just like paint, but it's actually a dye.
        >
        > good luck with this project.
        >
        > brighest of blessings,
        > paula mcwhirter-buck
        >
        > --- tuesdaycoren <tuesdaycoren@...> wrote:
        >
        > > HI!!
        > >
        > > Hope this question isn't too amateur...
        > >
        > > I was looking to have a Japanese sumi artist paint a bamboo motif on
        > > some fabric to be turned into a dress....
        > >
        > > The background needs to be white....
        > >
        > > My question is: what kind of fabrics would you recommend?
        > >
        > > I didn't want to go with anything too light weight as this would be
        > > the
        > > bodice portion of the dress... I also didn't want the "paint" to run
        > > too much..
        > >
        > > any help MUCH APPRECIATED :)
        > >
        > > ~tuesday hammerl
        > >
        > >
        >
        > "THE TIME HAS COME", THE WALRUS SAID,"TO TALK OF MANY THINGS.
        > OF SHOES, AND SHIPS AND SEALING WAX, OF CABBAGES AND KINGS.
        > AND WHY THE SEA IS BOILING HOT, AND WHETHER PIGS HAVE WINGS."
        >
        > __________________________________________________
        > Do You Yahoo!?
        > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
        > http://mail.yahoo.com
        >
        >

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