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Dress Sheilds question

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  • princesserika12
    Our theater company works on a very small budget and cannot afford to dry clean during the run of a production. We run for 7-8 weeks with 4 performances a
    Message 1 of 12 , Jul 23, 2007
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      Our theater company works on a very small budget and cannot afford to
      dry clean during the run of a production. We run for 7-8 weeks with 4
      performances a week.

      I need some guidance on how to prevent staining/soiling and major odors.

      Someone once told me that one can use pantiliners as disposable dress
      sheilds? Also, supposedly there is a vodka/water mixture that you can
      spray on clothes like Febreeze? Someone also told me that using
      febreeze damages garments?

      Can anyone confirm these or have better suggestions? I really don't
      want to buy disposable shields at 2.50 a pop. And Febreeze isn't
      extremely cheap either, and if it is damaging, I definitely don't want
      to use it.

      Thank you in advance!
    • Shadows Silk
      The vodka/water mix is called French Cleaner. I have some in my sewing room and works wonderfully. Turn the garments inside out, hang and spray and allow to
      Message 2 of 12 , Jul 24, 2007
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        The vodka/water mix is called French Cleaner. I have some in my sewing room and works wonderfully. Turn the garments inside out, hang and spray and allow to dry. Rhonda was always asked why she had a bottle of vodka on her expense account, LOL! Sorry, but I don't know the measuring formula. I just based it on my requirements and common sense. A 26er would last the year.
        Jacquie

        princesserika12 <erika@...> wrote:
        Our theater company works on a very small budget and cannot afford to
        dry clean during the run of a production. We run for 7-8 weeks with 4
        performances a week.

        I need some guidance on how to prevent staining/soiling and major odors.

        Someone once told me that one can use pantiliners as disposable dress
        sheilds? Also, supposedly there is a vodka/water mixture that you can
        spray on clothes like Febreeze? Someone also told me that using
        febreeze damages garments?

        Can anyone confirm these or have better suggestions? I really don't
        want to buy disposable shields at 2.50 a pop. And Febreeze isn't
        extremely cheap either, and if it is damaging, I definitely don't want
        to use it.

        Thank you in advance!




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      • cyncorley
        You could use washable dress shields. (I buy mine from Richard the Thread.)These are made from cotton with an inner plastic layer and you tack them into the
        Message 3 of 12 , Jul 24, 2007
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          You could use washable dress shields. (I buy mine from Richard the
          Thread.)These are made from cotton with an inner plastic layer and you
          tack them into the armscye of the garments and then just remove and
          wash/dry them and tack them back in. A little bit of effort but they
          work well. You could also use the vodka and water spray inside the
          garments while the shields are in the wash and air the garment well.
          Don't dry clean the shields accidentally--they turn in to potato
          chips! :-) Good luck!
        • Alexadbw@aol.com
          In a message dated 7/24/2007 8:02:02 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time, erika@chancetheater.com writes: Can anyone confirm these or have better suggestions? I really
          Message 4 of 12 , Jul 24, 2007
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            In a message dated 7/24/2007 8:02:02 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
            erika@... writes:

            Can anyone confirm these or have better suggestions? I really don't
            want to buy disposable shields at 2.50 a pop. And Febreeze isn't
            extremely cheap either, and if it is damaging, I definitely don't want
            to use it.

            Thank you in advance!




            Yes, Panti liners do make excellent shields. The Irish dance community (
            competitive) uses them quite a bit...boys included. Some of the more fearful
            types may pin them in, but depending on the style of the costume they probably
            aren't going any where they shouldn't!

            And while an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure, the next best
            thing is to use "Nature's Miracle" on any stinky areas. Yes, it is the same
            stuff you use to get odor out of carpets when a pet has had an accident.
            Available at larger pet stores.

            There is also another product called "Fresh again" made specifically for
            perspiration. You can google it..I don't know if it is still around. I have some
            but never used it as much as the Nature's Miracle, so I really don't know how
            well it works. I never had a problem with spotting with NM, but of course as
            always test, test, test!
            Alexa



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          • Julia Trimarco
            Vodka is an old trick. You don t have to mix it with anything. Buy the cheapest bottom shelf vodka you can find, the kind in a large plastic jug, put it in
            Message 5 of 12 , Jul 24, 2007
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              Vodka is an old trick. You don't have to mix it with anything. Buy the cheapest bottom shelf vodka you can find, the kind in a large plastic jug, put it in spray bottles and spray it on the insides of costumes wherever there might be odor. The alcohol kills the germs so they don't stink anymore, but it doesn't leave any scent (many actors are irritated by the scents in "fresheners", and it's cheaper). Make sure to do it just after each performance (unless you have another performance that day), to allow it time to dry before the next show.

              Also, if you have the time and some extra free labor from interns or something, you can make reusable dress shields from cotton remnants. After you cut them and serge the edges, the interns or volunteers can sew the snaps onto them and into the costumes. They can also be pinned in with tiny brass safety pins, this saves time sewing, but uses up wardrobe's time unpinning them for laundering, so it's really only a temporary solution.

              A third solution is supplying the actors with T-shirts and insisting that they wear them under the costumes (generally only works with men's costumes) - or you can require the actors to bring in their own t-shirts (AND leave them at the theatre for wardrobe to launder for them).

              -Jypsie


              Our theater company works on a very small budget and cannot afford to
              dry clean during the run of a production. We run for 7-8 weeks with 4
              performances a week.

              I need some guidance on how to prevent staining/soiling and major odors.

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            • bonnie carter
              Our theatre also uses pantyliners as disposable shields. I think they work quite well. Although one time one of our actresses almost lost hers during a
              Message 6 of 12 , Jul 24, 2007
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                Our theatre also uses pantyliners as disposable
                shields. I think they work quite well. Although one
                time one of our actresses almost lost hers during a
                scene, so you may want to have them pin them in.

                Also, do you get bulk cleaning rates? We have two
                cleaners that we use that both charge us bulk rates
                and do a very good job with our costumes. (We run a
                rental shop, not just a theatre, so we do have a LOT
                of cleaning). However, with the cost of costumes, I
                would be quite concerned about having the items go
                through that extensive of a run without drycleaning.
                It may be worth asking. Our secondary cleaners
                doesn't advertise that he does bulk, but he was more
                than happy to get the business. It's VERY affordable.
                And they pick up and deliver.


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              • Don McCunn
                Erika, You might want to check out the Hygienic Liner from the Fabric-Depot. In their catalog it simply states to protect a garment while a customer is trying
                Message 7 of 12 , Jul 24, 2007
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                  Erika,

                  You might want to check out the Hygienic Liner from the Fabric-Depot.
                  In their catalog it simply states to protect a garment while a
                  customer is trying it on. I don't know if it would work for your
                  purposes. But if you call in your order, you will be talking to the
                  woman who owns the business and she's very nice, helpful, informative,
                  etc. My impression is she will not try to sell you something that
                  would be inappropriate for your needs. And at $0.10 a piece, they
                  certainly aren't that expensive.

                  http://fabricdepotco.com/2007FabDD/page3.html

                  Best,
                  Don McCunn
                  http://How-to-Make-Sewing-Patterns.com/
                • Curtis
                  ... for ... I have some ... know how ... course as ... Fresh Again is designed specifically as a pre-treatment to take out odors during dry-cleaning, as often
                  Message 8 of 12 , Jul 24, 2007
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                    --- In TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com, Alexadbw@... wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    > There is also another product called "Fresh again" made specifically
                    for
                    > perspiration. You can google it..I don't know if it is still around.
                    I have some
                    > but never used it as much as the Nature's Miracle, so I really don't
                    know how
                    > well it works. I never had a problem with spotting with NM, but of
                    course as
                    > always test, test, test!

                    Fresh Again is designed specifically as a pre-treatment to take out
                    odors during dry-cleaning, as often the heat of the process will bake
                    an undesirable aroma into items...you spray it down with FA before
                    taking it to the cleaners and it helps get the odor out completely.
                    In theory...

                    It's better than nothing, but before I discovered it's ACTUAL intended
                    use (imagine that, reading the directions?) and we were trying to use
                    it as a deodorizing spray, some of our performers started referring to
                    it as 'Fresh Begone', because by itself, it wasn't getting rid of
                    their odor and it also had a very distinct aroma of its own (and I'm
                    still asked 'What's that smell?' to this day when I'm pretreating
                    dry-cleaning with it...)

                    The vodka-water mix, as I've always heard it described, was
                    50/50...and cheap vodka works as well or better than the good stuff.
                    In a pinch, you could also probably try rubbing alcohol, as
                    (theoretically) it should have the same effect and the actual alcohol
                    content is higher (and I don't know anywhere that you can but vodka
                    for a dollar a bottle...) I've tried it and had fair results...but
                    we're running three shows simultaneously, 2-4 performances a day, 6
                    days a week, for three months running. There are a LOT of treatments
                    out there that people swear by that just can't keep up with that.

                    My latest intriguing discovery...using Resolve carpet cleaner (in a
                    pump spray bottle) to pre-treat shirt collars and keep the
                    ring-around-the-collar minimized. Wet it down well, hit it with a
                    small scrubbing brush, and let it sit for a few minutes before washing
                    it normally (I'll sometimes pretreat the shirt collars while I'm doing
                    another load of wash, to give myself something to do while waiting for
                    the washer to finish). It's not perfect...but it's a darn sight more
                    effective than anything else I've tried up to this point!
                  • Alexadbw@aol.com
                    In a message dated 7/24/2007 11:41:54 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time, gckidd@yahoo.com writes: My latest intriguing discovery...My latest intriguing discovery
                    Message 9 of 12 , Jul 25, 2007
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                      In a message dated 7/24/2007 11:41:54 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
                      gckidd@... writes:

                      My latest intriguing discovery...My latest intriguing discovery
                      pump spray bottle) to pre-treat shirt collars and keep the
                      ring-around-ring-around-<WBR>the-


                      I'm definitely going to try that one!!!

                      I have heard from others that vodka is best used on new, still wet stains.
                      One good thing about "Nature's Miracle" Is that it works on old, dry odors as
                      well as new, so if one item slips through the cracks you still have an
                      option.
                      Alexa



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                    • fuzzylobsters@netzero.net
                      l have heard from others that vodka is best used on new, still wet stains. said Alexa My finding, fer shure. Applying a vodka mixture to an old sweat stain
                      Message 10 of 12 , Jul 26, 2007
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                        "l have heard from others that vodka is best used on new, still wet stains. " said Alexa

                        My finding, fer shure. Applying a vodka mixture to an old sweat stain resulted in a smell like - well, like a sweaty vodka-soaked drunk. And a 1 to 1 mixture with water seems to work best for me - the seeming logic that `stronger must be more effective' doesn't always apply!
                        Regards, Sir Real


                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • bearhedded
                        Spraying rubbing alcohol is NOT a good idea. The reason vodka is reasonably safe to use, is the fact that it s manufactured as an ingestable product. A
                        Message 11 of 12 , Jul 26, 2007
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                          Spraying rubbing alcohol is NOT a good idea.

                          The reason vodka is reasonably safe to use, is the fact that it's manufactured as an
                          ingestable product. A mist of rubbing alcohol could be inhaled, and I'm sure you've read
                          the warnings on the label.....
                        • Anne Redish
                          Even with drycleaning, arm pits in garments get abuse! And Dry cleaning is too expensive and in many cases (I know there are some GREEN exceptions) not good
                          Message 12 of 12 , Jul 27, 2007
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                            Even with drycleaning, arm pits in garments get abuse! And Dry
                            cleaning is too expensive and in many cases (I know there are some
                            GREEN exceptions) not good for anybody! And it's hard on the fabric
                            and garment in general!
                            I'd say make your own dress sheilds. It's a good sewing project.
                            The thin plastic is Diaper liner available here through Fabricland ..
                            also known as Joannes. If you have 1 pair purchased, use it as a
                            pattern. Getting the flip-inside-out worked out is a bit of a trick,
                            but serging them together is a great exercise in serging curves ..
                            not for a complete novice! Carefull when assembling not to pin
                            through the part that needs to be sweat proof! You can also make
                            ones coloured to suit the garment (Like men's suit jackets! )not just
                            black and white. Also in various sizes, and ones with short
                            undersleeves for extra short sleeved dresses!
                            A while back, we made up a big batch, made them in white, and put
                            them in all our commonly 'rented' out dresses. These are labelled
                            with the colour and style of the dress they go in, (or it could be
                            the catalogue / sign out Number) They do not go out without them! The
                            shields are labelled right and left when we use snaps since the snaps
                            may not be exactly symmetrically placed. Avoid the dryer as this
                            shortens their life! Hang to dry.


                            Anne Redish
                            Department of Drama,
                            Queen's University,
                            Kingston, Ontario
                            613-533-6000 x75359
                            483-3245 cell
                            ar11@...
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