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Re: Chintz vs Polished Cotton

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  • themadcouture2001
    Pat, thank you soooo much for the detailed and most educational article about chintz and polished cottons. I honestly never really got that far into how a lot
    Message 1 of 3 , Apr 21 9:21 PM
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      Pat, thank you soooo much for the detailed and most educational
      article about chintz and polished cottons. I honestly never really
      got that far into how a lot of the fabrics are made, as I am from a
      fairly small town, and those types of classes aren't available here.
      So it helps when people like you are willing to share. I appreciate
      it!!

      Thanks again!!!

      Judy


      --- In TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com, <NJgardner@...> wrote:
      >
      > Without running to the books - chintz has a glossy surface from
      glazing or
      > calendering (pressing with large rollers, lots of pressure) and is
      usually
      > printed with florals now. Originally from India, 16th, 17th
      centuries and
      > were hand painted, elaborate tree of life designs, imitated in
      Europe with
      > block prints on cotton fabric. The gloss if from glazing often
      washes out.
      > Some stores will sell glazed fabric as chintz, even though its a
      solid
      > color. Polished cotton does not have a glaze applied. The sheen
      comes
      > from pressing. Chintz and polished cotton can be either plain
      weave or a
      > sateen weave. These fabrics were originally all cotton, but now
      often
      > blends of polyester and cotton. These are all mainly sold for
      home dec
      > applications. There are some glazed cottons for utI have
      purchased some
      > that had a plastic/resin type of finish on it rather than a wax
      glaze. Not
      > one for reading the fine print on care lables, I machine washed and
      dried
      > hot. It wrinkled more than I thought it should and the iron
      dragged on it.
      > A related fabric also found in home dec is cretonne. Its a plain
      weave
      > cotton, sometimes with fine slubs, printed with typical home dec
      motifs. It
      > has a matte finish.
      >
      > All that said, if you find one you like and want to make a dress or
      jacket
      > or whatever out of it, go for it. They might be hard to ease, esp.
      sleeve
      > caps and if bolt says to dry clean, it would do that unless you
      test with a
      > good size sample first. As home dec fabrics they have all sorts of
      finishes
      > on them suitable for their intended purpose. Washing can remove
      some of
      > them and they may not have been treated in anyway to keep wrinkles
      at bay.
      > Also, if the fabric has a satin weave, the washing can cause it to
      get a
      > fuzzy surface which of course takes the gloss away and can make it
      look
      > faded or dirty.
      >
      > Pat
      >
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: "themadcouture2001" <THEMADCouture@...>
      > To: <TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com>
      > Sent: Friday, April 20, 2007 9:04 PM
      > Subject: [TheCostumersManifesto] Chintz vs Polished Cotton
      >
      >
      > >I would like to know the difference between Chintz, polished
      cotton,
      > > and glazed cotton. Who can help me. And which products are used
      for
      > > what? Just an informative question, as I don't know the
      difference,
      > > but probably should. ggg
      > >
      > > Judy
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Yahoo! Groups Links
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > --
      > > No virus found in this incoming message.
      > > Checked by AVG Free Edition.
      > > Version: 7.5.446 / Virus Database: 269.5.5/769 - Release Date:
      4/19/2007
      > > 5:56 PM
      > >
      > >
      >
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