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Armscye?

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  • hoxierice
    Armscye This has been a question of mine for a long time, but it just came up again today. I am trying to find the history of this word. All I have found is
    Message 1 of 4 , Dec 15, 2005
      Armscye
      This has been a question of mine for a long time, but it just came up
      again today. I am trying to find the history of this word. All I have
      found is that scye is in the OED as the opening of a coat or gown into
      which the sleeves are inserted. Anyone know any more than that? I
      asked another group of "crafty", but not specifically costume people.
      What about the armscye vs. armseye question. I was always taught
      armscye, but (have found in my quick search) that armseye may be more
      common?
      Thanks
    • Steven Sorton
      The term is short for arm circle. I m not shure where it originates, though. Lord Ironwulf ironwulf@optonline.net Yahoo ID: lordironwulf Shadow Dale
      Message 2 of 4 , Dec 16, 2005
        The term is short for arm circle. I'm not shure where it originates, though.


        Lord Ironwulf

        ironwulf@...

        Yahoo ID: lordironwulf



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        ----- Original Message -----

        Date: Fri, 16 Dec 2005 01:40:22 -0000
        From: "hoxierice" <hoxierice@...>
        Subject: Armscye?

        Armscye
        This has been a question of mine for a long time, but it just came up
        again today. I am trying to find the history of this word. All I have
        found is that scye is in the OED as the opening of a coat or gown into
        which the sleeves are inserted. Anyone know any more than that? I
        asked another group of "crafty", but not specifically costume people.
        What about the armscye vs. armseye question. I was always taught
        armscye, but (have found in my quick search) that armseye may be more
        common?
        Thanks






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      • Love3angle
        ... I recently read a blurb on this word but I can t remember where... The upshot was that the common idea was that armscye was dreived from scythe, which was
        Message 3 of 4 , Dec 31, 2005
          --- In TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com, "hoxierice"
          <hoxierice@y...> wrote:
          >
          > Armscye
          > This has been a question of mine for a long time, but it just came up
          > again today. I am trying to find the history of this word. All I have
          > found is that scye is in the OED as the opening of a coat or gown into
          > which the sleeves are inserted. Anyone know any more than that? I
          > asked another group of "crafty", but not specifically costume people.
          > What about the armscye vs. armseye question. I was always taught
          > armscye, but (have found in my quick search) that armseye may be more
          > common?
          > Thanks
          >
          I recently read a blurb on this word but I can't remember where... The
          upshot was that the common idea was that armscye was dreived from
          scythe, which was in imitation of that curve of the scythe. BUT that it
          was bunk/urban legend. The proper word was armseye and the other was a
          misspelling that has turned into common usage.

          Now, where did I read that...

          Alyxx
        • Rebecca Ballard
          I found this description here (http://www.personal.utulsa.edu/~marc-carlson/cloth/glossary.html) which mentions the word scye and sey : Armscye (Armseye) *
          Message 4 of 4 , Dec 31, 2005
            I found this description here
            (http://www.personal.utulsa.edu/~marc-carlson/cloth/glossary.html)
            which mentions the word "scye" and "sey":

            Armscye (Armseye)

            * It's not a term that is particularly medieval, but it gets tossed
            around a lot in medieval clothing discussions. It means 'Armhole', or
            that roundish place in the body of a garment that the sleeve gets set
            into.
            * OED "Scye - The opening in a coat into which a sleeve is inserted.
            1st listed use is 1825 JAMIESON Suppl. s.v. Sey, The sey of a gown or
            shift is the opening through which the arm passes. Etymology is listed
            as "A use of a Scots and Ulster dialect word (written also sey, sci,
            si, sie, sy in glossaries) meaning 'the opening of a gown, etc., into
            which the sleeve is inserted; the part of the dress between the armpit
            and the chest' (E.D.D.); of obscure etymology.
            * Armseye is listed in a description of 'Dolman' (sleeves) in the
            OED, dated to 1934.

            Interesting! =)

            Rebecca

            On 12/31/05, Love3angle <alyxx.iannetta@...> wrote:
            > --- In TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com, "hoxierice"
            > <hoxierice@y...> wrote:
            > >
            > > Armscye
            > > This has been a question of mine for a long time, but it just came up
            > > again today. I am trying to find the history of this word. All I have
            > > found is that scye is in the OED as the opening of a coat or gown into
            > > which the sleeves are inserted. Anyone know any more than that? I
            > > asked another group of "crafty", but not specifically costume people.
            > > What about the armscye vs. armseye question. I was always taught
            > > armscye, but (have found in my quick search) that armseye may be more
            > > common?
            > > Thanks
            > >
            > I recently read a blurb on this word but I can't remember where... The
            > upshot was that the common idea was that armscye was dreived from
            > scythe, which was in imitation of that curve of the scythe. BUT that it
            > was bunk/urban legend. The proper word was armseye and the other was a
            > misspelling that has turned into common usage.
            >
            > Now, where did I read that...
            >
            > Alyxx
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
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