Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Tricky rouleaux

Expand Messages
  • Steve
    Hi all, I recently spent several hours trying to make 1/8 rouleau, for button loops,out of one layer of silk crepe covered with two layers of silk chiffon. As
    Message 1 of 10 , Jul 15, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi all,

      I recently spent several hours trying to make 1/8" rouleau, for
      button
      loops,out of one layer of silk crepe covered with two layers of silk
      chiffon.
      As hard as I tried, I cold not turn this combination of fabrics
      through
      using a standard rouleaux hook. I'd manage to pull about 1" through,
      then it would bunch up and jam.
      I cut equal width bias strips, sewed with a zip foot and the fabric
      folded around piping cord to maintain the width, and did not stretch
      the strips whilst sewing...
      ...so where did I go wrong!!
      I'm so hoping someone will say "you should have done this and this,
      it's so simple!"

      steve :o)
    • Julia Trimarco
      I usually sew the tube wider than I want it to end up finished, because 1) the stretching from turning and the width lost in the turn of the seam will make the
      Message 2 of 10 , Jul 17, 2005
      • 0 Attachment
        I usually sew the tube wider than I want it to end up finished, because 1) the stretching from turning and the width lost in the turn of the seam will make the final tube the 1/8" you intended, and 2) turning that many layers through would require a little bit of extra wiggle room.
        I would think that turning three layers (that's six layers of allowance) through 1/8" would be just about impossible.
        You can trim down the allowance down to the bare minimum to keep the seam together, but even then, it might prove difficult. There is a tool that makes turning easier than with just a hook. It has several metal tubes of different diameters. You fit the stitch fabric tube over the correct metal tube, and use the hook provided to pull the fabric through. This eases the friction of fabric agains fabric, as it just has to slip down the metal instead. Unfortunately, I can't tell you where to get one, I used someone else's on the the job once, and I've never been able to find one for myself. Does anyone know where to get one of these?
        -Julia, Jypsie Designs
        Steve <stevonewell@...> wrote:
        Hi all,

        I recently spent several hours trying to make 1/8" rouleau, for
        button
        loops,out of one layer of silk crepe covered with two layers of silk
        chiffon.
        As hard as I tried, I cold not turn this combination of fabrics
        through
        using a standard rouleaux hook. I'd manage to pull about 1" through,
        then it would bunch up and jam.
        I cut equal width bias strips, sewed with a zip foot and the fabric
        folded around piping cord to maintain the width, and did not stretch
        the strips whilst sewing...
        ...so where did I go wrong!!
        I'm so hoping someone will say "you should have done this and this,
        it's so simple!"

        steve :o)






        SPONSORED LINKS
        Costuming Elizabethan costuming

        ---------------------------------
        YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS


        Visit your group "TheCostumersManifesto" on the web.

        To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
        TheCostumersManifesto-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

        Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.


        ---------------------------------




        ---------------------------------
        Start your day with Yahoo! - make it your home page

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Pierre & Sandy Pettinger
        It s called Fasturn . www.clotilde.com Item #126893 (use item number search) www.nancysnotions.com Item #F1-STB Both are approx. $27 USD. ...
        Message 3 of 10 , Jul 19, 2005
        • 0 Attachment
          It's called "Fasturn".

          www.clotilde.com Item #126893 (use item number search)
          www.nancysnotions.com Item #F1-STB

          Both are approx. $27 USD.

          At 10:57 PM 7/17/2005, you wrote:
          >There is a tool that makes turning easier than with just a hook. It has
          >several metal tubes of different diameters. You fit the stitch fabric tube
          >over the correct metal tube, and use the hook provided to pull the fabric
          >through. This eases the friction of fabric agains fabric, as it just has
          >to slip down the metal instead. Unfortunately, I can't tell you where to
          >get one, I used someone else's on the the job once, and I've never been
          >able to find one for myself. Does anyone know where to get one of these?
          >-Julia, Jypsie Designs

          "Those Who Fail To Learn History
          Are Doomed to Repeat It;
          Those Who Fail To Learn History Correctly --
          Why They Are Simply Doomed.

          Achemdro'hm
          "The Illusion of Historical Fact"
          -- C.Y. 4971

          Andromeda
        • Sally
          ... There s a cheap version, which I got at a JoAnn s some years ago - it s called a Turn-it-All, and underneath it says The Original Bow Whip (tm) . You
          Message 4 of 10 , Jul 19, 2005
          • 0 Attachment
            > I would think that turning three layers (that's six layers of
            > allowance) through 1/8" would be just about impossible.
            > You can trim down the allowance down to the bare minimum to keep
            > the seam together, but even then, it might prove difficult. There
            > is a tool that makes turning easier than with just a hook. It has
            > several metal tubes of different diameters. You fit the stitch
            > fabric tube over the correct metal tube, and use the hook provided
            > to pull the fabric through. This eases the friction of fabric
            > agains fabric, as it just has to slip down the metal instead.
            > Unfortunately, I can't tell you where to get one, I used someone
            > else's on the the job once, and I've never been able to find one
            > for myself. Does anyone know where to get one of these?


            There's a cheap version, which I got at a JoAnn's some years ago -
            it's called a Turn-it-All, and underneath it says 'The Original "Bow
            Whip" (tm)'. You can see it about a third of the way down on this page:

            http://www.thecalicocat.com/dollnotions.htm

            (Have no idea what kind of vendor these folk are, but a Google search
            turned them and many other doll-making places up.) There's a more
            expensive version too, which is all metal if I'm not mistaken (this
            one is a mixture of plastic, wood and metal parts) but I'm afraid I
            don't remember its name, though possibly poking around on doll-making
            sites might help you. I'm trying to remember the context I heard
            about it in, but I don't use mine much, because I make bias tubes
            wrong sides together and use bias bars to turn the seam allowance
            under. On the other hand, when that's what you need, it's a life-saver.

            Hope this helps,

            --Sally
            t

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Sally
            . ... Aha. I found the more expensive tube turner. http://www.joannescreativenotions.com/index.html?url=http%3A//
            Message 5 of 10 , Jul 19, 2005
            • 0 Attachment
              .
              > I would think that turning three layers (that's six layers of
              > allowance) through 1/8" would be just about impossible.
              > You can trim down the allowance down to the bare minimum to keep
              > the seam together, but even then, it might prove difficult. There
              > is a tool that makes turning easier than with just a hook. It has
              > several metal tubes of different diameters. You fit the stitch
              > fabric tube over the correct metal tube, and use the hook provided
              > to pull the fabric through. This eases the friction of fabric
              > agains fabric, as it just has to slip down the metal instead.
              > Unfortunately, I can't tell you where to get one, I used someone
              > else's on the the job once, and I've never been able to find one
              > for myself. Does anyone know where to get one of these?


              Aha. I found the more expensive tube turner.

              http://www.joannescreativenotions.com/index.html?url=http%3A//
              www.joannescreativenotions.com/fasturn/fasturn.html

              Hope this helps.

              --Sally



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Sylvia Wong
              I believe the device you are referring to is called Fasturn . I found mine locally years ago in So. California, but it is on line at Clotilde.com for under
              Message 6 of 10 , Jul 20, 2005
              • 0 Attachment
                I believe the device you are referring to is called "Fasturn". I
                found mine locally years ago in So. California, but it is on line at
                Clotilde.com for under $30.00.

                --- In TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com, Julia Trimarco
                <eilonwy14@y...> wrote:
                > I usually sew the tube wider than I want it to end up finished,
                because 1) the stretching from turning and the width lost in the
                turn of the seam will make the final tube the 1/8" you intended, and
                2) turning that many layers through would require a little bit of
                extra wiggle room.
                > I would think that turning three layers (that's six layers of
                allowance) through 1/8" would be just about impossible.
                > You can trim down the allowance down to the bare minimum to keep
                the seam together, but even then, it might prove difficult. There is
                a tool that makes turning easier than with just a hook. It has
                several metal tubes of different diameters. You fit the stitch
                fabric tube over the correct metal tube, and use the hook provided
                to pull the fabric through. This eases the friction of fabric agains
                fabric, as it just has to slip down the metal instead.
                Unfortunately, I can't tell you where to get one, I used someone
                else's on the the job once, and I've never been able to find one for
                myself. Does anyone know where to get one of these?
                > -Julia, Jypsie Designs
              • Meg
                Fasturn tubes are wonderful! They can also be found at some fabric stores, where you might be able to get them on sale. The ones that we use in our shop were
                Message 7 of 10 , Jul 20, 2005
                • 0 Attachment
                  Fasturn tubes are wonderful! They can also be found at some fabric
                  stores, where you might be able to get them on sale. The ones that
                  we use in our shop were bought online, and we were able to get a
                  nifty storage case for them as well. Highly recommended - especially
                  for very small tubes!

                  Meg

                  --- In TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com, Julia Trimarco
                  <eilonwy14@y...> wrote:
                  > I usually sew the tube wider than I want it to end up finished,
                  because 1) the stretching from turning and the width lost in the turn
                  of the seam will make the final tube the 1/8" you intended, and 2)
                  turning that many layers through would require a little bit of extra
                  wiggle room.
                  > I would think that turning three layers (that's six layers of
                  allowance) through 1/8" would be just about impossible.
                  > You can trim down the allowance down to the bare minimum to keep
                  the seam together, but even then, it might prove difficult. There is
                  a tool that makes turning easier than with just a hook. It has
                  several metal tubes of different diameters. You fit the stitch fabric
                  tube over the correct metal tube, and use the hook provided to pull
                  the fabric through. This eases the friction of fabric agains fabric,
                  as it just has to slip down the metal instead. Unfortunately, I can't
                  tell you where to get one, I used someone else's on the the job once,
                  and I've never been able to find one for myself. Does anyone know
                  where to get one of these?
                  > -Julia, Jypsie Designs
                  > Steve <stevonewell@h...> wrote:
                  > Hi all,
                  >
                  > I recently spent several hours trying to make 1/8" rouleau, for
                  > button
                  > loops,out of one layer of silk crepe covered with two layers of
                  silk
                  > chiffon.
                  > As hard as I tried, I cold not turn this combination of fabrics
                  > through
                  > using a standard rouleaux hook. I'd manage to pull about 1"
                  through,
                  > then it would bunch up and jam.
                  > I cut equal width bias strips, sewed with a zip foot and the fabric
                  > folded around piping cord to maintain the width, and did not
                  stretch
                  > the strips whilst sewing...
                  > ...so where did I go wrong!!
                  > I'm so hoping someone will say "you should have done this and this,
                  > it's so simple!"
                  >
                  > steve :o)
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > SPONSORED LINKS
                  > Costuming Elizabethan costuming
                  >
                  > ---------------------------------
                  > YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
                  >
                  >
                  > Visit your group "TheCostumersManifesto" on the web.
                  >
                  > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                  > TheCostumersManifesto-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                  >
                  > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
                  Service.
                  >
                  >
                  > ---------------------------------
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > ---------------------------------
                  > Start your day with Yahoo! - make it your home page
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Steve
                  Dear Julia, Many thanks for your thoughts. In the end I had to make up rouleaux without the layer of crepe - not ideal but time was getting tight! I m
                  Message 8 of 10 , Jul 23, 2005
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Dear Julia,

                    Many thanks for your thoughts. In the end I had to make up rouleaux
                    without the layer of crepe - not ideal but time was getting tight!

                    I'm certainly looking into the metal tube gizmo, thanks to all for
                    helpful links.

                    Steve.
                  • bearhedded
                    Maybe too little, to late, but my computer has been comatose for a few weeks.... When I need to make tubes of layered fabrics, I sew the strips together down
                    Message 9 of 10 , Jul 27, 2005
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Maybe too little, to late, but my computer has been comatose for
                      a few weeks....
                      When I need to make tubes of layered fabrics, I sew the strips
                      together down the middle first, with a long stitch, using the
                      thinnest needle I have. It keeps everything aligned. I measure
                      the circumference of the cord to be covered by wrapping it with a
                      scrap of fabric, or a piece of ribbon, measure that, and treat the
                      process more like edge stitching than a piping project.
                      Trim seam allowance now, if necessary, but DON"T PRESS!!!!
                      (the basting thread may scar the project if you do that at this
                      point!)
                      If you don't have a fast turn, (or equivalent, and especially if
                      you're making yards and yards of tubing) many hardware stores
                      stock brass tubing of various diameters in 3' lengths! I drop a
                      carpet-threaded needle through the brass tube to pull the project
                      through it.
                      After the piece is turned right-side out, I remove the original
                      stabilizing thread. The needle marks may need to be coaxed out
                      at this point with your thumbnail, usually they don't show!
                      Have fun!
                    • Joannah Hansen
                      Steve, This is probably way too late for you, but the thought occurred to me that the problem is that you are cutting all the layers exactly the the same size.
                      Message 10 of 10 , Aug 6, 2005
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Steve,

                        This is probably way too late for you, but the thought occurred to me that the problem is that you are cutting all the layers exactly the the same size. Think about it. Once folded over to sew down the side of the tube of all these exactly the same size layers, do you end up seeing different amounts of the different layers, eg most of the inner ( eventual outer ) layer, less of the middle layer, and least of the outer ( eventual inner ) layer? If so, what is happening is that when you fold them over, especially since you are turning them over piping cord, the layers of fabric on the inside are taking up more space, so that when you are trying to turn them right side out, you are trying to force larger amounts of fabric through a smaller tube.

                        Try cutting your middle layer slightly narrower than the outer layer, then the innermost layer slightly narrower still than the middle layer, then fold them in half, making sure that the edges are aligned. This is going to be a bit tricky, because the now inner layers will have more fabric, making a bulge. But, once you have sewn your seam, I think it should turn more easily, because you will be pulling smaller tubes through larger ones.

                        I hope this made sense, and helps.
                        Good luck!

                        Joannah

                        <
                        Hi all,

                        I recently spent several hours trying to make 1/8" rouleau, for
                        button
                        loops,out of one layer of silk crepe covered with two layers of silk
                        chiffon.
                        As hard as I tried, I cold not turn this combination of fabrics
                        through
                        using a standard rouleaux hook. I'd manage to pull about 1" through,
                        then it would bunch up and jam.
                        I cut equal width bias strips, sewed with a zip foot and the fabric
                        folded around piping cord to maintain the width, and did not stretch
                        the strips whilst sewing...
                        ...so where did I go wrong!!
                        I'm so hoping someone will say "you should have done this and this,
                        it's so simple!"

                        steve :o)






                        SPONSORED LINKS
                        Costuming Elizabethan costuming

                        ---------------------------------
                        YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS


                        Visit your group "TheCostumersManifesto" on the web.

                        To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                        TheCostumersManifesto-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

                        Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.


                        ---------------------------------




                        ---------------------------------
                        Start your day with Yahoo! - make it your home page

                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






                        Yahoo! Groups Links









                        _____________________________________________________________
                        Sluggy.Net: The Sluggy Freelance Community!
                      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.