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Re: Wedding dress help

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  • tjchatham
    ... and ... to rig ... Oh, Lisa... I think I can help you out here. Just finished bustling my own daughter s very full wedding dress just a year ago. The
    Message 1 of 8 , Jul 14 9:18 AM
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      --- In TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com, "~lisa.s"
      <llsturts@g...> wrote:
      > A colleague has had one of those "wedding dress from hell" episodes
      and
      > I've agreed to bail her out. Can any one offer guidance as to how
      to rig
      > bustling the train?
      >
      > Thanks.
      >
      > ~lisa.s
      > --
      > * llsturts@g...

      Oh, Lisa... I think I can help you out here. Just finished "bustling"
      my own daughter's very full wedding dress just a year ago. The best
      on-line "instructions" we found were here:
      http://www.sewing.org/enthusiast/html/esb_weddinggowntips.html

      But I also had a copy of Singer's book Sewing for Special Occasions
      (it has detailed instructions for all the little details in making a
      bridal gown, including 2 types of bustling). You can find it at any
      fabric shop or online at Amazon, etc.

      It really all depends on how BIG and full and HEAVY the back of the
      dress is... (ours had several panels... a princess design with a 3'
      train) and how you want it to look afterwards.... bundled inside or
      out and over. We had 5 ties to grab up and tie together up high on
      the underside putting the bustle on the outside, but I found
      that "practice" makes perfect. I had to remove and reposition a
      couple of the ties to get the look we were after and to get the whole
      hem off the floor for dancing. It took two of us.... one to hold the
      dress up and one to grab the ties and tie them together. Do make sure
      the ties are securely attached and properly positioned. The loop or
      tie on the center back seam that all the other ties are tied to needs
      to be the highest possible (probably just under the last button or
      end of the zipper) and the other ties on the center and other seams
      positioned lower each time. Ours had one tie positioned about midway
      on the back seam and ties on two other seam lines on both sides of
      the center seam. Putting ties at the seam lines was best for us
      because of the added strength of a stitched and finished seam, but
      you may have to use a different approach, maybe re-enforcing the non-
      seam spots with a bit of twill tape or spot of interfacing on the
      underside so the fabric will support the weight and tension of the
      tie. Do re-enforce the outside of the gown at that point, too....
      usually with a pearl or other smooth clear glass bead (no sharp edges
      to cut the thread, though....carefull!!).
      Some folks do the loop and hook or button method on top of the gown
      (the "bustle" folds inside). That works too, but I think it works
      better for "lighter" weight fabrics. Ours was a very heavily beaded
      lace over a heavy satin gown that was fully lined.... several layers
      of fabric that had to be anchored together for the bustling (with a
      3mm pearl bead on STRONG buttonhole twist thread through all layers
      and tightly into the ribbon underneath).
      It isn't going to look too bad... one way or the other and it's
      better than dragging the poor thing across a dirty floor. Some less
      full gowns even allow for a loop of ribbon stitched into the back
      seam and looped over the bride's wrist during the reception. That
      wouldn't have worked for us.... gown much too full and heavy, so the
      several ties and "underbustling" were our best choice.
      Best of luck on the bustling!
      Tess
    • tuesday coren
      drape it on the bride with pins.... then under neath mark it using numbers and sew in ties.... be sure to number the ties also so bustling after the ceremony
      Message 2 of 8 , Jul 14 9:31 AM
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        drape it on the bride with pins....

        then under neath mark it using numbers and sew in ties.... be sure to number the ties also so bustling after the ceremony is a breeze...

        ~2

        "~lisa.s" <llsturts@...> wrote:
        A colleague has had one of those "wedding dress from hell" episodes and
        I've agreed to bail her out. Can any one offer guidance as to how to rig
        bustling the train?

        Thanks.

        ~lisa.s
        --
        * llsturts@...




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      • Rebecca Ballard
        This page has some great bustling info and links, too: http://www.leanna.com/Bridal/Bustles.htm I ve also successfully combined overbustling and french
        Message 3 of 8 , Jul 14 10:09 AM
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          This page has some great bustling info and links, too:
          http://www.leanna.com/Bridal/Bustles.htm
          I've also successfully combined overbustling and french bustling for a
          nifty Victorian look on a wedding gown.
          Good luck and hope this helps!
          Rebecca

          On 7/11/05, ~lisa.s <llsturts@...> wrote:
          >
          > A colleague has had one of those "wedding dress from hell" episodes and
          > I've agreed to bail her out. Can any one offer guidance as to how to rig
          > bustling the train?
          >
          > Thanks.
          >
          > ~lisa.s
          > --
          > * llsturts@...
          >
          >
          >
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        • tjchatham
          ... and ... to rig ... Lisa, I replied to your question yesterday, but I don t know what happened to my post....maybe my answer was too long, so I ll try to
          Message 4 of 8 , Jul 15 8:17 AM
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            --- In TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com, "~lisa.s"
            <llsturts@g...> wrote:
            > A colleague has had one of those "wedding dress from hell" episodes
            and
            > I've agreed to bail her out. Can any one offer guidance as to how
            to rig
            > bustling the train?
            >
            > Thanks.
            >
            > ~lisa.s
            > --
            > * llsturts@g...

            Lisa,
            I replied to your question yesterday, but I don't know what happened
            to my post....maybe my answer was too long, so I'll try to send it
            again... in a shorter format. My daughter and I had to learn how to
            bustle up her very full and heavily beaded wedding dress with a 3
            foot train so she could dance at her reception. The best on-line
            instructions on bustling a wedding gown that we found were here:

            http://www.sewing.org/enthusiast/html/esb_weddinggowntips.html

            But I also had a copy of Singer's book Sewing for Special Occasions
            (it has detailed instructions for all the little details in making a
            bridal gown, including 2 types of bustling). It was VERY helpful...
            lots of pics. You can find it at any fabric store or on-line at
            Amazon, etc.

            We had to do the bustle on the outside of the dress, since it was
            such a full and heavy one, so the thing was tied up on the inside
            with several ribbons. The dress was a princess style....
            several "gores" front and back. There was a loop high up on the back
            seam inside (underneath) just below the end of all the buttons.
            That's what we had to tie all the other ribbons to. There was a
            ribbon on the center back seam about half way down and ribbons on 4
            other seams in back .... 2 each side, fanning out from center both
            ways each farther down a bit. The ribbons were securely fastened into
            the seam of the lining, satin and lace all held together with
            buttonhole twist thread and a pearl bead was on the outside for
            further "support" and so the fabric and lace wouldn't tear with all
            the stress placed on those points. I did have to reposition 2 of the
            ties a bit further down on 2 of the seams to pull the bustle up a bit
            higher to keep it off the floor. It took a bit of practice and two
            people... one to hold the back of the skirt up and one to tie the
            ribbons together into the top loop, but we finally got the dress and
            train up off the floor to keep it somewhat clean.
            If your dress isn't too full or too heavy, loops and hooks or buttons
            on the outside of the dress is another way to go...but the "bustle"
            goes "inside" (ours flipped out and over on the "outside" of the
            skirt). I've also seen just a single loop of ribbon near the bottom
            (lining) of the train that was looped over the bride's wrist during
            the reception, but this would only work for very light weight and not
            very full trains.
            Well, hope this helps... and hope it gets posted this time.
            Tess
          • CostumeShopManager
            Find out how the professionals do it. Simply go to a bridal shop and look at dresses. There are several ways to do it depending on the length of the train
            Message 5 of 8 , Jul 15 10:09 AM
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              Find out how the professionals do it. Simply go to a bridal shop and
              look at dresses. There are several ways to do it depending on the
              length of the train and fabric of the gown. It is not really the
              engineering feat that many believe.



              -----Original Message-----
              From: TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com
              [mailto:TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of ~lisa.s
              Sent: Monday, July 11, 2005 3:51 PM
              To: CostumersManifesto
              Subject: [TheCostumersManifesto] Wedding dress help

              A colleague has had one of those "wedding dress from hell" episodes and
              I've agreed to bail her out. Can any one offer guidance as to how to rig
              bustling the train?

              Thanks.

              ~lisa.s
              --
              * llsturts@...





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            • Sheila Martinez
              I must have missed Lisa s email about the bustle. I do bridal alterations, and bustling is one of those things I do best. You might be able to get information
              Message 6 of 8 , Jul 15 11:35 AM
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                I must have missed Lisa's email about the bustle.
                I do bridal alterations, and bustling is one of those things I do best.
                You might be able to get information at the bridal shop, but generally their expertise is in selling the dress, then referring the bride to the alterations person. Many shops do not have in house seamstresses.
                If you have any questions about the bustle, I will be more that happy to help. There are just so many ways to bustle, and a lot depends on the shape of the train, the fabric used, and the style of the dress.
                and you are so correct. It is not and engineering feat...it is really quite simple once you look at the whole picture.
                sheila

                CostumeShopManager <costumes@...> wrote:
                Find out how the professionals do it. Simply go to a bridal shop and
                look at dresses. There are several ways to do it depending on the
                length of the train and fabric of the gown. It is not really the
                engineering feat that many believe.




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              • llsturts@greatlakes.net
                Thanks to all for offering their help and expertise. I just now finished the work, and must say it came out quite well--and I don t think it ll take a
                Message 7 of 8 , Jul 16 6:27 AM
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                  Thanks to all for offering their help and expertise. I just now finished
                  the work, and must say it came out quite well--and I don't think it'll
                  take a structural engineer to bustle her up after the ceremony, as opposed
                  to what it took to get my sister-in-law's dress up. This is why I expected
                  it to be a bigger job than it turned out to be.

                  Again, thanks. This group is a great resource!

                  lisa.s
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