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Re: Mystery Book

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  • neimhaille
    ... out the ... trying to ... if you can ... order it on ... patterns ... I do have nearly all the patterns, and the photos I can touch up in PSP. I had a look
    Message 1 of 5 , Jan 21, 2002
      > Wow! I have definitely not seen this book before. I just checked
      out the
      > scans in the photos area of the egroup and I can see why you are
      trying to
      > track it down. I urge all and sundry to look at the scans and see
      if you can
      > identify the name of the book. If we can find the title, I can
      order it on
      > Interlibrary loan and (if it is past copyright) scan the images and
      patterns
      > for the Manifesto so we can all have access to it.

      I do have nearly all the patterns, and the photos I can touch up in
      PSP. I had a look in the Fine Arts Library too, and it was not in
      there. If I can find out where it has gone I will dfinatly be getting
      it out on interloan.

      I also have some nearly fallen apart Girls Own Annuals that I've been
      copying articles from:
      http://frazzledfrau.tripod.com/titanic/index.htm for this very
      purpose of saving the books for other people.

      Just looking for the catalogue:
      http://voyager.auckland.ac.nz/
      There is a book in there from 1909, but it does look like the one.
      Author: Clinch, George, 1860-
      Title: English costume from prehistoric times to the end of the
      eighteenth centruy,
      Published: London, Methuen & co. [1909]
      Description: xxii p., 1 l..,295, [1] p. incl. illus., plates. front.,
      plates, ports. 23 cm.
      LC Subject Heading(s): Costume--England.
      England--Social life and customs.
      Location: GENERAL LIBRARY
      Call Number: 391.0942 C64
      Status: Available


      Another looks tempting:
      Author: Planché, J. R. (James Robinson), 1796-1880.
      Title: History of British costume : from the earliest period to the
      close of the eighteenth century / by J.R. Planché.
      Edition: 3rd ed.
      Published: London : George Bell & Sons, 1893.
      Description: xxiv, 416, [48] p. : ill. ; 19 cm.
      LC Subject Heading(s): Costume--Great Britain--History.
      Location: OFF-CAMPUS STORAGE (General A)
      Call Number: S08527
      Status: Available

      Perhaps too early but it fits the size... and page numbers.

      I'm just doing a search on the net for both authors.


      michaela
    • thecostumersmanifesto
      I m wrong, I HAVE seen it before, probably when I was in HS. I was going through a file folder of very old xeroxes I made and found a copy I made long ago.
      Message 2 of 5 , Jan 22, 2002
        I'm wrong, I HAVE seen it before, probably when I was in HS. I was
        going through a file folder of very old xeroxes I made and found a
        copy I made long ago. It is definitely the same book. It is "Dress
        Design" from "The Artistic Crafts Series of Technical Handbooks"
        edited by W.R. Lethaby in 1913. My copies look like crap however.
        Many of the clothes are matches to V&A garments still on display in
        the costume court and recognizable as such. So are you going to copy
        it and put it on the web? If not let me know and I'll try and get it
        on ILL to do so.

        --- In TheCostumersManifesto@y..., "neimhaille" <vcairistiona@h...>
        wrote:
        > > Wow! I have definitely not seen this book before
      • neimhaille
        ... is Dress ... Thank you:). Now I can do a hunt. I loved it so much, I d really like my own copy. I just did a quick look, the only book by that name is
        Message 3 of 5 , Jan 23, 2002
          > I'm wrong, I HAVE seen it before, probably when I was in HS. I was
          > going through a file folder of very old xeroxes I made and found a
          > copy I made long ago. It is definitely the same book. It
          is "Dress
          > Design" from "The Artistic Crafts Series of Technical Handbooks"
          > edited by W.R. Lethaby in 1913.

          Thank you:). Now I can do a hunt. I loved it so much, I'd really like
          my own copy.

          I just did a quick look, the only book by that name is
          Author: Hughes, Talbot.
          Title: Dress design, an account of costume for artists and
          dressmakers.
          Published: [s.l.] : [s.n.], 1932.

          hmmm.... they don't have any detail as to the size or anything. I'm
          going to the Uni tonight, and just have a look at it.

          This *is* the one, just found mention of it elsewhere:
          HUGHES, Talbot. Dress design, an account of costume for
          artists and dressmakers. London, 1913. Black and white
          illustrations. Includes an appendix "Cutting to scale".GT5
          10.H8
          I'll ask if someone at rehersal could let me use their card to get it
          on loan, or else see if I can get it on ILL. Funny how I never saw it
          when I was there...


          michaela
        • Julia Logan Trimarco
          Hi! I just wanted to respond to this topic of disintegrating pictorial research and resources. I, too, have become both frustrated and nauseuous from the
          Message 4 of 5 , Jan 24, 2002
            Hi! I just wanted to respond to this topic of disintegrating pictorial
            research and resources. I, too, have become both frustrated and nauseuous
            from the quality of microfilm sources. And, although the oldest books are
            in danger, even more recent magazine research can be hard to find. This is
            why I have an arrangement with my local library. They keep periodicals for
            one year, after that they throw them out. A wonderful librarian keeps them
            for me, and gives me a stack every time I go to the library. I then, as I
            have the spare time, go through the magazines and eliminate the pages of no
            use costume-wise. I'm hoping, when I can afford to buy the equipment, to
            scan all these photos onto CD-Rom and onto a web site. This will be several
            years down the road. In the meantime, I reassure myself with the thought
            that in fifty years, these pictures will be invaluable. And of course,
            whenever I am antiquing I buy old (1890 - 1920) magazines, catalogs, and
            photographs wherever I can find them. They usually go for cheap, since we
            are quite possibly the only ones that find value in them.
            Julia


            >From: "Tara Maginnis, Ph.D., Costume Designer" <Tara@...>
            >Reply-To: TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com
            >To: TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com
            >Subject: [TheCostumersManifesto] Re: Mystery Book
            >Date: Mon, 21 Jan 2002 15:59:59 -0900
            >
            > > I just uploaded two images fromt he book to the photo section of the
            > > list.
            > > The first is the dress that also appears in your book, and the second
            > > is the pattern that accompanies it. There are a *lot* of patterns in
            > > the back section. I have a feeling this book has actually been lost,
            > > as it is not in the catalogue.
            >
            >Wow! I have definitely not seen this book before. I just checked out the
            >scans in the photos area of the egroup and I can see why you are trying to
            >track it down. I urge all and sundry to look at the scans and see if you
            >can
            >identify the name of the book. If we can find the title, I can order it on
            >Interlibrary loan and (if it is past copyright) scan the images and
            >patterns
            >for the Manifesto so we can all have access to it.
            >
            >Let me get on my soapbox here too: It is an unfortunate fact that nearly
            >all paper made and used for books and magazines from about 1830-1990 was
            >printed on acid based paper. This means nearly every book, newspaper and
            >magazine produced during that time is on paper that ultimately self
            >destructs, like a time bomb. The libraries of the world are in a crisis
            >over
            >what is to be done to save these resources. To save the information on this
            >paper requires highly expensive de-acidification or comparatively
            >inexpensive
            >microfilming. The simple
            >economics of library funding means that libraries will mostly use
            >microfilm,
            >(which is troublesome for costumers), as well as have to pick and choose
            >which books and magazines are "important" enough to go to the expense of
            >copying. I need hardly tell you where items like Turn of the Century
            >tailoring and millinery manuals will rate in this lifeboat situation.
            >Therefore, for the good of future costumers, (including one's self,) we
            >each
            >need to notice when books like this are on the shelf of our local library
            >falling apart. A book that is coming apart is a book whose days are
            >numbered,
            >soon to be thrown out. In the case of some pre 1910 catalogs, and drafting
            >and sewing manuals, you may be looking at the last one of it's kind. The
            >libraries can't afford to save all of them, so, you need to grab these
            >books,
            >before they are gone, and either plain paper copy them onto an acid free
            >paper like Copysource (most modern copy paper is acid free now) and bind up
            >the copies, OR EVEN BETTER scan the copies and save them on CD ROM disks so
            >they can replace the originals. If each of us does this with a few books,
            >we
            >will save these endangered resources, as well as quickly and cheaply expand
            >our own private libraries of rare research works. IN ADDITION in the case
            >of
            >copyright expired works, if you take the time to save them as scanned
            >copies
            >in jpeg form, you can load these onto the web (as I do) and share these
            >rescued copies with thousands of costumers worldwide at little cost to you,
            >and great benefit to the costuming community at large. If each member of
            >this list did this with just ONE of these self-destructing books, we would
            >save 286 rare, and likely soon to be gone pieces of our history. RL Shep
            >and
            >Dover can't reprint them all, but it only costs a little time and server
            >space on a free site for each of you to do this. (It took me only a day
            >each
            >to scan and upload the two books I have added to my site recently
            >http://www.costumes.org/pages/new.htm ) If you are a student, chances are
            >your costume professor will give you class credit for doing this sort of
            >project, if you are a professor with students who need busywork to fill
            >practicum hours at the end of a semester, this is an easy project that
            >doesn't use valuable materials. Consider doing this, PLEASE. (And when
            >you
            >do, send me your URL so I can link to you). Every day 1000 people come to
            >my
            >site looking for this kind of information, so remember, doing this
            >literally
            >helps thousands upon thousands of us costumers every year.
            >--
            >----Tara Maginnis, Ph.D., Costume Designer/Associate Professor
            >Chair of the Theatre Department of University of Alaska Fairbanks
            >Website: "The Costumer's Manifesto" at http://www.costumes.org
            >Theatre Department Web Site: http://www.uaf.edu/theatre
            >
            >




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