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Re: [TheCostumersManifesto] Digest Number 1256

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  • Curtis Kidd
    ... You mean there s actually enough demand for makeup designers in your area to make that a viable job? Most theaters around here just have the actors do
    Message 1 of 2 , Apr 18, 2005
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      > From: "catslave54" <zimmermanel@...>
      > Subject: Clothes for invisible people AND an invisible
      > paycheck!
      >
      >
      >
      > just doing the best we can to get by! Makeup and Set
      > Designers get
      > paid more because they demand to!

      You mean there's actually enough demand for makeup
      designers in your area to make that a viable job? Most
      theaters around here just have the actors do their own
      makeup...the only time I get a makeup gig is if someone
      needs something special (prosthetics, some kind of special
      effect makeup, stuff like that)--and even then, compared to
      the amount of work I do, I probably get paid less overall
      than I do for costumes.

      Also, have been an ASD, I need to point out the MONTHS of
      work that some set designers put in on their designs. The
      designer I worked with started working on his design about
      10 months before the show actually started (just as soon as
      the company decided what the show was going to be, in
      fact), and spent an indecent amount of time revising
      drawings, shopping for set pieces, and researching
      techniques to realize his design. He didn't stop working
      on the set until about fifteen minutes before house opening
      on opening night...the paint on some of the pieces was
      barely dry by the time the actors hit the stage.

      It's not just costumers that are underpaid. We work in an
      entertainment industry, which means that, by and large,
      EVERYONE is underpaid. Since people enjoy what we do, they
      think it's so much fun that we shouldn't need to be paid as
      much. Unless you work on Broadway, on the Strip in Vegas,
      or for one of the larger Hollywood production companies,
      we're all struggling to get by--from the directors all the
      way down to the stage hands. And the market is so
      competitive in those areas that most people are struggling
      to get by there, simply because they can't always hold down
      the job with all the clamor of other willing bodies beating
      on the back door waiting to get in and take their place.

      The only place I've ever heard anyone say there was
      constantly work available was Vegas, where even a spot
      operator on a non-headlining show can get paid $20/hr; but
      I don't want to live in Vegas. I'll take my pittance and
      stay here, where I enjoy the lifestyle (for the most part),
      the people, and my job.

      Not trying to be a wet blanket...but I do want to inject a
      dose of reality into this. NOBODY in theater gets paid
      what they're worth. At least, nobody I know--regardless of
      the job they've got.


      Curtis Kidd
      "Remember, the light at the end of the tunnel could be you!"

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    • Sylvia Rognstad
      ... I dont think the set designer puts in any work preliminary work than the costume designer, who also has to do research, renderings and shopping. Sylrog
      Message 2 of 2 , Apr 18, 2005
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        On Apr 18, 2005, at 11:32 AM, Curtis Kidd wrote:
        >
        > Also, have been an ASD, I need to point out the MONTHS of
        > work that some set designers put in on their designs.  The
        > designer I worked with started working on his design about
        > 10 months before the show actually started (just as soon as
        > the company decided what the show was going to be, in
        > fact), and spent an indecent amount of time revising
        > drawings, shopping for set pieces, and researching
        > techniques to realize his design.  He didn't stop working
        > on the set until about fifteen minutes before house opening
        > on opening night...the paint on some of the pieces was
        > barely dry by the time the actors hit the stage.

        I dont think the set designer puts in any work preliminary work than
        the costume designer, who also has to do research, renderings and
        shopping.

        Sylrog


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