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[TheCostumersManifesto] Patterns from 1860-1939

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  • Contessa
    The American Civil War Reenactors use suttlers. I ve put a web site for one of them that also has the historic patterns,
    Message 1 of 6 , Mar 4, 2005
      The American Civil War Reenactors use suttlers. I've put a web site for
      one of them that also has the historic patterns,

      http://www.fcsutler.com/fcpatterns.asp

      I hope this helps, the other thing you can do is do a search for civil war
      reeactors.

      Good luck
      Contessa

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "plg_lady" <giles001@...>
      To: <TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Thursday, March 03, 2005 3:15 PM
      Subject: [Norton AntiSpam] [TheCostumersManifesto] Patterns from 1860-1939


      >
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      > I've always thought that the clothing worn by the young ladies
      > depicted in Alphonse Mucha's paintings were so elegant and feminine.
      > I'd like to find some patterns from this time period. The women
      > shown in these paintings seem to be dressed in evening wear and not
      > your everyday costume. Any suggestions?
      > Thanks,
      > plg_lady
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    • serenpoly
      Mucha s ladies are the height of Art Nouveau, but the dresses are clearly fantasies on that theme. They re seriously dependant on trim and jewelry for their
      Message 2 of 6 , Mar 4, 2005
        Mucha's ladies are the height of Art Nouveau, but the dresses are
        clearly fantasies on that theme. They're seriously dependant on trim
        and jewelry for their effect, and generally have a lot of soft,
        floaty fabric - and rather a lot of bare skin - that wouldn't have
        been all that acceptable for respectable ladies in real life.

        You could start from anything that appeals from about 1895 - 1910
        (Art Nouveau's heyday) to get the right silhouette, and then adapt to
        bare shoulders, rich colors, and lots of trim.

        My personal favorite pattern for this sort of thing is the La Mode
        Bagatelle 'Artistic Reform' pattern suite. It's expensive (about
        $50, the last time I checked), but includes three dresses and three
        overdresses, with different sleeves, necklines, collars, etc., in a
        bunch of different sizes. You can, say, take the sleeves from one
        gown and put them on one of the overdresses, mix and match as you
        like, so the effective price of the pattern goes down rapidly. If
        you want bare, you'll have to cut off major bits of the bodices, but
        the underdress of the view with the open coat (A, I think) doesn't
        have a fitted inner bodice like the other two, and is easy to mess
        with. It's more work to adapt the inner bodice, but if you're
        successful, it'll stay put better when worn, and be less likely to
        show something you didn't want to show. ;-)

        Truly Victorian has several skirts with the right lines, but not a
        lot of bodices that will work, since they don't do the
        aesthetic/reform thing. They do show one version at

        http://trulyvictorian.netfirms.com/photo14.html

        that looks more or less right, but it has an 1879 bodice (much
        adapted) with an 1890's skirt...

        Laughing Moon Merchantile #104 is a little late, but rather a nice
        pattern. Check out what Farthingale's in Canada did with it:

        http://www.farthingales.on.ca/titanic_dress.php

        You might also check out McCall's 3797, Butterick 4093 or 4212 and
        Simplicity 5457 if all you want is a place to start. There used to
        be another Titanic pattern (Simplicity, I think) that produced
        something approximating the 'Swim' dress (the one she wears the night
        the ship hits the iceberg), but it appears to have been discontinued.

        The patterns that are intended to make Lord of the Rings gowns are
        also Art-Nouveau-influenced, since much of the movies was, too:
        McCall's 4490, 4491, and 4492, Butterick 3552, and Simplicity 4940.
        I have heard that the armscye on Simplicity 9891 are poorly drafted,
        making it difficult to raise your arms.

        Also look for examples of Liberty of London gowns (the V&A '400 Years
        of Costume' book has several examples), Pre-Raphaelite paintings, and
        the Costumer's Manifesto 'Reform' page under Costume History.

        HTH.

        -- Emc^2

        --- In TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com, "plg_lady"
        <giles001@m...> wrote:
        >
        > I've always thought that the clothing worn by the young ladies
        > depicted in Alphonse Mucha's paintings were so elegant and
        feminine.
        > I'd like to find some patterns from this time period. The women
        > shown in these paintings seem to be dressed in evening wear and not
        > your everyday costume. Any suggestions?
        > Thanks,
        > plg_lady
      • Aylwen & John
        Hi, I m putting together a proposal with costings to put together an exhibition of women s clothing in Australia from 1788 - 1901. I m looking to display both
        Message 3 of 6 , Apr 6, 2005
          Hi, I'm putting together a proposal with costings to put together an
          exhibition of women's clothing in Australia from 1788 - 1901. I'm
          looking to display both the day and evening gowns and their
          underpinnings and supports. I've only just started putting together the
          proposal, so would love any hints or suggestions that I should
          consider. I will the one making the garments - I'm looking at finding
          paintings of Australian women in this time-frame and copying the
          garments featured in them, that way they could be displayed with the
          painting and be more of a research project. I'm also hoping to put
          together a book detailing the progress of making all the garments.
          Warmest Regards, Aylwen
        • Centrestage.com
          Have you seen a book called Dressed in their Best - A 100 years of Family Photos (1860s-1950s) by Pam Liell? I bought it from a broadcast email -
          Message 4 of 6 , Apr 6, 2005
            Have you seen a book called "Dressed in their Best - A 100 years of Family
            Photos" (1860s-1950s) by Pam Liell?
            I bought it from a broadcast email - correspondence to P.O.Box 455 Concord
            West, N.S.W. 2138 - it was only about $30.
            Photos not paintings - but it may help.
            Cheers
            Mary
            ----- Original Message -----
            From: Aylwen & John <garden@...>
            To: <TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Thursday, April 07, 2005 10:24 AM
            Subject: [TheCostumersManifesto] Exhibition project


            >
            > Hi, I'm putting together a proposal with costings to put together an
            > exhibition of women's clothing in Australia from 1788 - 1901. I'm
            > looking to display both the day and evening gowns and their
            > underpinnings and supports. I've only just started putting together the
            > proposal, so would love any hints or suggestions that I should
            > consider. I will the one making the garments - I'm looking at finding
            > paintings of Australian women in this time-frame and copying the
            > garments featured in them, that way they could be displayed with the
            > painting and be more of a research project. I'm also hoping to put
            > together a book detailing the progress of making all the garments.
            > Warmest Regards, Aylwen
            >
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            > Yahoo! Groups Links
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          • Costume Gallery
            Message 5 of 6 , Apr 12, 2005
              On Apr 6, 2005, at 9:02 PM, Centrestage.com wrote:

              >
              >
              > Have you seen a book called "Dressed in their Best - A 100 years of
              > Family
              > Photos" (1860s-1950s) by Pam Liell?
              > I bought it from a broadcast email - correspondence to P.O.Box 455
              > Concord
              > West, N.S.W. 2138 - it was only about $30.
              > Photos not paintings - but it may help.
              > Cheers
              > Mary
              > ----- Original Message -----
              > From: Aylwen & John <garden@...>
              > To: <TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com>
              > Sent: Thursday, April 07, 2005 10:24 AM
              > Subject: [TheCostumersManifesto] Exhibition project
              >
              >
              >>
              >> Hi, I'm putting together a proposal with costings to put together an
              >> exhibition of women's clothing in Australia from 1788 - 1901. I'm
              >> looking to display both the day and evening gowns and their
              >> underpinnings and supports. I've only just started putting together
              >> the
              >> proposal, so would love any hints or suggestions that I should
              >> consider. I will the one making the garments - I'm looking at finding
              >> paintings of Australian women in this time-frame and copying the
              >> garments featured in them, that way they could be displayed with the
              >> painting and be more of a research project. I'm also hoping to put
              >> together a book detailing the progress of making all the garments.
              >> Warmest Regards, Aylwen
              >>
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              >> Yahoo! Groups Links
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              > Yahoo! Groups Links
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