Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re:How Do I Liquidate A Costume Studio?

Expand Messages
  • Ruth & Ana
    How about just changing what you do? I burned out about 7 years ago, trying to be the Renaissance SCA costumer from Brooks Brothers. I still have two large
    Message 1 of 1 , Mar 3, 2005
      How about just changing what you do? I burned out about 7 years ago,
      trying to be the Renaissance SCA costumer from Brooks Brothers. I still
      have two large drawers of trim, and my cotton fabric stash still takes
      up two closets, but in the meanwhile I went back to doing alterations,
      prom dresses, and "no brainer" custom clothing to make a living.

      Then I discovered that two or three times a year, it's fun to take a
      month "off" and make very simple stuff for sale on ebay. Add trim to the
      neckline and sleeves, get a little carried away and put it down the
      front, even. Not to make money, just to have fun and use up stuff. The
      creative surge is awesome! And occassionally, I find I'm making money.

      Part of this is to forget how much you paid for the stuff to start
      with. That's money already out the door. Start with now. Anything you
      can get for it now is pure profit at this point.

      What I had to let go of, was not the left over costumes themselves, but
      the dream of getting "what they are worth". Little by little, my ebay
      selling has become a combination of creativity and act of generosity.

      I still design and make costumes, but I have a different perspective on
      it now, since it is not the only thing I do to make money, and I don't
      feel like every one has to be "worth it". It helps that about 4 times a
      year, someone still orders a $500 outfit.

      If you don't want to do alterations, by all means, make soap, learn to
      knit, or go get an office job. Put everything into storage for a year.
      Get some perspective on your life. Then it won't be such a big deal.

      So often when we are tired and discouraged, problems loom larger than
      they do weeks or months later when we have rested and restored our sense
      of equalibrium. There was life before the costumes, there will be life
      after.

      May you find (again) the joy in your life.

      Ruth & Ana




      >
      >
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.