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Re: attaching a skirt to doublet bodice? separate pieces? I disagree

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  • Kimberly
    Humm.... that is a thought. I am not sure about how period, but that is a good idea to try. With the point being long, I think I could hide a pleat fairly
    Message 1 of 5 , Sep 27, 2004
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      Humm.... that is a thought. I am not sure about how period, but that
      is a good idea to try. With the point being long, I think I could
      hide a pleat fairly easy. Back to work!

      Thank you,
      KImberly
      >
      > Hey Kimberly,
      > It seems most of the responses you've gotten say that
      > bodices/doublets & skirts were always separate but I disagree. In
      > examining Janet Arnold's Patterns of Fashion and QE's Wardrobe
      > Unlocked, Kohler's A History of Costume and other period household
      > inventories, I would argue that many if not most dresses were
      exactly
      > that, joined as one piece.
      >
      > Construction-wise I'd say you make they pretty much the same as
      > separate pieces and whipstitch them together anyway. I've found in
      > every day wear that joining them together keeps all my clothes in
      > place and drapes far better than hooks & eyes or tying with points,
      > and if you have a good strong interlining it will not cause undue
      > wear on your top half.
      >
      > Not having a seam down the middle front is a problem, though. I
      went
      > through this myself when making my latest Venetian dress. The
      fabric
      > has a very bold design in it and I really didn't want to split it.
      > From scouring portraits and JA's books, I think they dealt with
      this
      > in period in a number of ways. Mostly, they just didn't seem to
      care
      > if there was a big seam through a design, or if the nap of a piled
      > fabric ran the wrong way, or what have you. Personally, that kind
      of
      > thing matters to me so I can't claim authenticity for my solution
      but
      > it really worked out well.
      >
      > I sewed my skirt into its big tube and lined it so it had a
      finished
      > edge at the waist (which had been curved a bit to match the bodice
      > waist curve without causing a droop in the pattern at the low front
      > and back waist points). When I cartridge pleated the waist to the
      > bodice, I left about a 10 inch section unpleated at the front. The
      > skirt was joined completely around to the bodice and when it was
      > laced up tight, the open section folded into a big box pleat behind
      > the waist point. It did require a couple of hook&eyes to keep it
      from
      > pulling down during dance sets, but it kept me from having to have
      a
      > big split and placket right at the front of my dress.
      >
      > Whatever you decide, let us know how it works out and all that. :-)
      >
      > Alyxx
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