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Re: [TheCostumersManifesto] Digest Number 1091

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  • Curtis Kidd
    ... Can t help you out on the straitjacket, but my mom came up with a great recipe for fake blood that I have NEVER had any trouble washing out of clothes
    Message 1 of 4 , Sep 22, 2004
      > From: "catslave54" <zimmermanel@...>
      > Subject: need blood recipes
      >
      > Well, it's THAT time of year again. I'm doing yet ANOTHER
      > production
      > of Dracula and this time I need washable blood. The last
      > recipe
      > called for food coloring in a liquid laundry soap base.
      > Any others
      > out there? And any thoughts on how to get Lucy's cross to
      > smoke as
      > it burns her forehead? And while I'm at it, anybody have
      > a
      > straitjacket I can rent for Renfield? Elizabeth

      Can't help you out on the straitjacket, but my mom came up
      with a great recipe for fake blood that I have NEVER had
      any trouble washing out of clothes (although everyone
      cringes when I tell them what the recipe is...but every
      item I've ever bloodied with the stuff has come out of the
      wash clean!)

      Start with clear corn syrup. Add red food coloring until
      you get a nice, intense red. Then add cocoa powder (I
      recommend the non-sweetened stuff...not the drink mix, the
      baking cocoa) to give it more opacity and darken it up.
      (You can also use the drink mix, but it REALLY leaves a
      disgustingly sweet aroma wherever you use it if you
      do...I've tried both variations.)

      The drawback is that it doesn't 'set' and so remains sticky
      until it's completely dried. The pluses are that it flows
      very naturally, and since the base is corn syrup, it
      dissolves rapidly in water. Once again, I have to
      reiterate that it's washed out of everything I'VE EVER
      TRIED WZSHING. I can't guarantee that it washes out of
      everything.

      Smoking cross--Somebody (I don't remember the company)
      makes a product in a spray-type can that looks like you're
      running a smoke machine (I have never shopped for the
      stuff, it was used on a production by a friend of mine and
      he loved the stuff). It may be possible to run a plastic
      tube from the can down to the hand of the actor holding the
      cross, so that when you're pushing the nozzle on the can,
      the smoke is released at the hand instead. That's the best
      I can think of. If you've got a really ingenious props
      guy, he might even be able to figure out a way to connect
      it to the cross, so that it really was the cross smoking (I
      used to work with a guy who would probably figure out a way
      to make a cross that could be loaded with some chemical
      compound that would smoke when mixed, along with a sliding
      latch to separate the two compounds until the appropriate
      moment, and vent holes to let the smoke out...but Kyle
      always did love to go above and beyond the call on stuff
      like that).

      The only places I can think of to get a straitjacket are
      asylums and haunted houses. You might try contacting any
      of those types of organizations in your area and see where
      they get theirs (might also try jails/prisons and mental
      wards of hospitals).

      =====
      Curtis Kidd
      "Remember, the light at the end of the tunnel could be you!"

      *********************************************************
      "One World, One Web, One Program" - Microsoft promo ad
      "Ein Volk, Ein Reich, Ein Fuhrer" - Adolf Hitler
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    • Sylvia Rognstad
      This discussion helps me too because I will be costuming a show soon that requires blood. I seem to recall from some years ago when I was working on a
      Message 2 of 4 , Sep 22, 2004
        This discussion helps me too because I will be costuming a show soon
        that requires blood. I seem to recall from some years ago when I was
        working on a production of Julius Caesar that it makes a difference
        whether the fabric that gets blood on it is cotton or poly. These were
        all white costumes. I cant remember which worked better. I would
        think cotton would since it bleaches and poly doesnt. Anyone have any
        thoughts on this?

        Sylrog

        On Sep 22, 2004, at 10:43 AM, Curtis Kidd wrote:

        > > 
        > Can't help you out on the straitjacket, but my mom came up
        > with a great recipe for fake blood that I have NEVER had
        > any trouble washing out of clothes (although everyone
        > cringes when I tell them what the recipe is...but every
        > item I've ever bloodied with the stuff has come out of the
        > wash clean!)
        >
        > Start with clear corn syrup.  Add red food coloring until
        > you get a nice, intense red.  Then add cocoa powder (I
        > recommend the non-sweetened stuff...not the drink mix, the
        > baking cocoa) to give it more opacity and darken it up.
        > (You can also use the drink mix, but it REALLY leaves a
        > disgustingly sweet aroma wherever you use it if you
        > do...I've tried both variations.)
        >
        > The drawback is that it doesn't 'set' and so remains sticky
        > until it's completely dried.  The pluses are that it flows
        > very naturally, and since the base is corn syrup, it
        > dissolves rapidly in water.  Once again, I have to
        > reiterate that it's washed out of everything I'VE EVER
        > TRIED WZSHING.  I can't guarantee that it washes out of
        > everything.
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Sylvia Rognstad
        We looked into mental institutions when I needed a straitjacket too but were consistently told that no one uses them anymore since they now have medications
        Message 3 of 4 , Sep 22, 2004
          We looked into mental institutions when I needed a straitjacket too but
          were consistently told that no one uses them anymore since they now
          have medications that work better.

          Sylrog

          On Sep 22, 2004, at 10:43 AM, Curtis Kidd wrote:
          > The only places I can think of to get a straitjacket are
          > asylums and haunted houses.  You might try contacting any
          > of those types of organizations in your area and see where
          > they get theirs (might also try jails/prisons and mental
          > wards of hospitals).
          >
          > =====
          >

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Contessa
          Ugh...I hate shows with blood because they are so hard on the costumes and so many of our costumes are not washable...like I said, doing Shakespeare 11 months
          Message 4 of 4 , Sep 22, 2004
            Ugh...I hate shows with blood because they are so hard on the costumes and so many of our costumes are not washable...like I said, doing Shakespeare 11 months of the year, we do tend to do a lot of shows that require it, like Caesar, McB and Titus Andronicus, etc...

            Anyway, we make all of the white shirts of 50/50 poly/cotton or sometimes 65/35 poly/cotton and the rough shirts are mostly poly blends (amazingly they do not look like poly!) and the blood always washes out quite well...sometimes we put Oxy-clean in with the white shirts and that stuff is incredible! Yes, cotton could be bleached but if you are doing a long run and had to do a lot of bleaching, it would break down the fibers pretty quickly...We also use a lot of drapery and upholstery fabrics and many of them are at least partly synthetic fibers and the blood washes out of them easily too (of course I always pre-wash a few times before I cut out when using something like this so no surprises later due to shrinkage)...

            Hope this helps...

            Contessa



            Sylvia Rognstad <sylvia@...> wrote:
            This discussion helps me too because I will be costuming a show soon
            that requires blood. I seem to recall from some years ago when I was
            working on a production of Julius Caesar that it makes a difference
            whether the fabric that gets blood on it is cotton or poly. These were
            all white costumes. I cant remember which worked better. I would
            think cotton would since it bleaches and poly doesnt. Anyone have any
            thoughts on this?

            Sylrog


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