Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [TheCostumersManifesto] Anyone got any cat proofing ideas?

Expand Messages
  • Kathryn Parke
    Okay, so at this point I have to weigh in with my cat and sewing story (or rather, ongoing battle). I keep my pins in an old plastic butter tub, and I keep my
    Message 1 of 24 , Jul 22, 2004
    • 0 Attachment
      Okay, so at this point I have to weigh in with my cat and sewing story (or rather, ongoing battle). I keep my pins in an old plastic butter tub, and I keep my colored marking chalks in it, too. I also do a lot of my sewing sitting on the floor. Well, I turned around in time to see my youngest cat making off with my blue chalk. Of course I chased him down and retrieved it, but he kept stealing it -- but only the BLUE chalk. So I removed the blue chalk, and then he switched to stealing other colors. At that point, I decided that I would put up with the inconvenience of keeping the lid on the tub even while I was sitting right there and working with it. The next thing I knew, he’d stolen the entire butter tub, and, by the time I caught up with him, he had it upside down and was pulling at it with his teeth and paws in such a way that he’d almost gotten the top off! So I started keeping the tub firmly under my leg, but he spent so much time trying to dig it out from under me that I finally had to banish him. When I let him back in, with the tub of pins hidden out of the way but my project still on the floor, I came back from the bathroom to discover that he’d almost entirely unpinned both seams! Now I have to keep him out of the sewing room entirely -- but if he ever comes across a pincushion that I’ve forgotten to put back, I can count on his pulling them all out. I have no idea what caused this idiocy, and thank God he’s never yet managed to hurt himself, but he is an annoying and much-beloved little weirdo!

      Cheers --
      KP


      --- Heidi Hobson <a1viola@...> wrote:


      _____________________________________________________________
      Save rainforest for free with a Planet-Save.com e-mail account:
      http://www.planet-save.com


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Joannah Hansen
      Unfortunately, I can t think of any way to keep your cats/cat hair off your projects, except to have a cat-free room to work in, which you are sort of doing
      Message 2 of 24 , Jul 23, 2004
      • 0 Attachment
        Unfortunately, I can't think of any way to keep your cats/cat hair off your projects, except to have a 'cat-free' room to work in, which you are sort of doing with your garage as it is. As far as storage goes, if you don't want to be storing your posh frocks in the garage, perhaps keeping them in a garment bag (like the ones used by garment hire companies) in your wardrobe would work? Another possibility for fabric storage is a locked cupboard/closet, which is only opened to put things in and take things out, and stays locked at all other times. (As far as I know, no cat has ever learned to use a key, yet. ;-) ) Or those plastic storage boxes with the lids that are latched down by the box handles.

        One thing which I have discovered is very effective at getting cat fur off fabric, is to put on a (clean) rubber glove (like you use for doing the dishes) and wipe the gloved hand over the fabric. The fur sort of rolls up and of the fabric.

        Another thing for your girl who loves to knead - she mostly likes to lie on the fabric to be near you when you're working, if she's anything like my lot - is to make up a largish flat pillow for her to lie on, on top of your working fabric, if necessary. If you make the pillow out of something which she REALLY loves, my guess is that she won't complain, or more to the point, move off the pillow once she has been placed on it. Then she can knead to her heart's content, without damaging what you're working on.

        Hope this helps.
        Joannah


        --- Heidi Hobson <a1viola@...> wrote:
        I have three cats, only one of them has managed to come to the realization that he isn't a kitten anymore. They all LOVE to curl up on fabric. They never fail to get into wherever/whatever they want to, either. We keep fabric in the garage, to keep them off it. Anybody got any ideas on cat proofin during a project? I ask because the one with the maturity is dark, and we use white satin on a lot of projects and our girl LOVES to knead! And no, we can't declaw her, she gets out from time to time and it would endanger her, and claw sheaths? Been there, done that, WAY too much hassle. So what next? We can't work with clawed fabric, and it is SO hard to get Sammy and Piccolo's darker fur off satin and velvet! PLEASE, any ideas. I've even had to keep my Prom Dress and White Satin Evening Gown in the Garage! Any ideas, please? Their adorable, but they are little troublemakers (most of the time Pumpkin doesn't even mean to cause trouble)!

        Dragon's eye wide,
        Heidi


        ---------------------------------
        Do you Yahoo!?
        New and Improved Yahoo! Mail - Send 10MB messages!

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





        Yahoo! Groups Links







        _____________________________________________________________
        Sluggy.Net: The Sluggy Freelance Community!
      • Sylvia Rognstad
        I dont have a solution. I have the opposite problem. Light colored cats and I work with black fabrics. A lot of net and tulle, which act like magnets. I
        Message 3 of 24 , Jul 23, 2004
        • 0 Attachment
          I dont have a solution. I have the opposite problem. Light colored
          cats and I work with black fabrics. A lot of net and tulle, which act
          like magnets. I think I'm going to start putting a disclaimer on the
          invoices I send out with my garments, since I know I can never get all
          the cat hair off of them.

          Sylrog

          On Jul 22, 2004, at 11:49 PM, Heidi Hobson wrote:

          > I have three cats, only one of them has managed to come to the
          > realization that he isn't a kitten anymore. They all LOVE to curl up
          > on fabric. They never fail to get into wherever/whatever they want to,
          > either. We keep fabric in the garage, to keep them off it. Anybody got
          > any ideas on cat proofin during a project? I ask because the one with
          > the maturity is dark, and we use white satin on a lot of projects and
          > our girl LOVES to knead! And no, we can't declaw her, she gets out
          > from time to time and it would endanger her, and claw sheaths? Been
          > there, done that, WAY too much hassle. So what next? We can't work
          > with clawed fabric, and it is SO hard to get Sammy and Piccolo's
          > darker fur off satin and velvet! PLEASE, any ideas. I've even had to
          > keep my Prom Dress and White Satin Evening Gown in the Garage! Any
          > ideas, please? Their adorable, but they are little troublemakers (most
          > of the time Pumpkin doesn't even mean to cause trouble)!
          >
          > Dragon's eye wide,
          > Heidi
          >
          > ����� �����
          > ---------------------------------
          > Do you Yahoo!?
          > New and Improved Yahoo! Mail - Send 10MB messages!
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
          >
          > ADVERTISEMENT
          > <lrec_companion_043004.gif>
          > <l.gif>
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          > � To visit your group on the web, go to:
          > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/TheCostumersManifesto/
          > �
          > � To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
          > TheCostumersManifesto-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          > �
          > � Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
          > Service.
          >
          >

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Loretta Armstrong
          Ruffling on a serger is the BEST. Nothing comes close. But describing it with out my hands and an example? Er, that may be difficult. Let me explain what I
          Message 4 of 24 , Jul 23, 2004
          • 0 Attachment
            Ruffling on a serger is the BEST. Nothing comes close. But
            describing it with out my hands and an example? Er, that may be
            difficult.
            Let me explain what I used my shiring foot for and see it help you
            understand...
            I worked at a 50's diner to put myself through college. You had a
            uniform, but you had lots of leg room to add personality (and
            increase tips!!) I put together a number of peticoats to wear. Some
            looked like square dance peticoats, made with tule, and some were
            fabric, but they all followed the same idea. You start with
            one 'tier' going around your waist, then the next 'tier' was
            attached to that and was ruffled. (This is where the shiring foot
            came in.) The next tier was added, and on and on.
            I wore these peticoats for about 2 years. None of them ever fell
            apart. I would directly sew one layer to the other, so the layers
            were ruffled AND sewn on at the same time. I used a 4 thread with a
            short stich length, and just for safety and to keep the seams from
            rubbing against my legs, I would sew the serged seam down.
            To specificaly answer your questions:
            The seams hold up really well.
            You don't have to remove the knives- in fact, you still want them.
            You are just making a regular serger seam, but one of the layers is
            getting ruffled.
            How expensive is the foot? I really don't know. I totaly luck out
            because my mom teaches sewing at a store in Boulder, CO, and they
            don't pay her money, they pay in store credit. So I either get
            things free or at a really good discount. But really, no matter how
            much it costs, it is worth it. When I started making peticoats I
            would ruffle by hand and that took FOREVER. The foot works by
            seperating the two layers of fabric. The top layer just moves along
            evenly but the bottom layer gets pulled in more using the
            differental feed. It's fun to watch because that bottom layer just
            ruffles up and you don't touch anything! The serger then just works
            like usual, cutting off the seam allowance and overlocking the two
            edges. By the time the two layers get to the needle, they are back
            together, so the folded peice gets sewn to straight top peice.
            You can also just run one peice through the bottom of the foot with
            differental feed and just ruffle it.
            Is this making any sense? I have often thought about taking picts
            when I make a peticoat and making an online tutorial. If you would
            find that benifical, let me know and I will work on it!!

            Cats, ah, cats in our lives.
            I just moved my sewing room out of it's isolated room and into the
            open basement. I figured it was more important to spend time with my
            husband while I was sewing than protecting my stuff from cat hair. I
            have a bunch of plastic drawers that I keep my fabric in- it
            protects it from much, including the kittens. I need to find a cover
            for my serger because my moms cat used to chew on those threads. You
            have to be aware of what dammage they do, and be ready to combat it.
            My husband and I discovered that one of our kittens likes to chew
            cords- he chewed through some christmas lights and my husbands cell
            phone charger -while it was plugged in!! So now every cord in our
            house is covered with bitter apple to keep him from chewing.
            And sometimes, you can give them a 'peace offering.' Give them a
            scrap of what you are working on. That is their toy. Sometimes they
            understand and will only play with what they are given. Now you have
            to be careful and not just give them a scrap to play with, it has to
            be what they want. They would much rather chew on my boots than my
            scraps of leather, and so I think I may give them an old pair of
            birkenstocks to chew. And sometimes, you just have to embrace it as
            a personality quirk. You can very easily tell if something is mine
            or if I have worked on it- It is covered in cat hair and often has
            one or two peices of my own long hair on it, which is another
            discussion thread entirely.
            L
            .....gad, I can talk a lot!!

            --- In TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com, K Murphy
            <costumerkate@y...> wrote:
            > Hi Loretta:
            >
            > I would die to have a good, fast, ruffling technique on my
            serger. I've used the ruffler attachment on my regular Bernina
            machine with "mixed" (read: not very good) results. How does the
            overlock ruffle stand up? Does it make a nice, strong seam? How
            expensive is the shirring foot? Do you have to remove the knife?
            Do you use four threads? All my instruction book outlines is how to
            shir, not how to seam a gathered ruffle to a flat edge.
            >
            > And I envy you that kitten. I have only my three elderly kitty-
            cats creeping about, keeping my sewing chair warm for me and eating
            every thread in sight.
            >
            > Kate
            >
          • Ruth & Ana
            I can only speak of 5 thread sergers, as that is all I ve ever used. Unless you re doing a lot of production sewing where having the combination of the chain
            Message 5 of 24 , Jul 23, 2004
            • 0 Attachment
              I can only speak of 5 thread sergers, as that is all I've ever used.
              Unless you're doing a lot of production sewing where having the
              combination of the chain stitch and the overcasting simultaneously will
              save you time (about 1/3 for a Renaissance tunic), then they are more
              expensive than the money they will make for you. Get a 4 thread. My
              next one will be a 4 thread, after three 5 thread sergers in 15 years.

              Another note. This winter, I had a new guy "clean and oil" my 5 thread,
              not realizing that while he might know what he was doing on a 3 or 4
              thread serger, he didn't know beans about a 5 thread serger. I
              compounded the problem by then taking it to another repairman, who
              loosened all the adjustments, and then couldn't get it back aligned. I
              had to send it back to the factory (this was after already paying a
              total of $180 to the two incompetants) and pay them almost $200 to get
              it repaired and running again. Finally, I found someone who does know
              beans about 5 thread sergers, who explained that they are infinitely
              more complicated mechanisms than 4 or 3 thread, and he finally got it
              fixed and running (more or less) properly for another $150.

              Another VERY big reason to get a 4 thread machine. Make sure the dealer
              offers on going instruction for free to customers and don't leave the
              shop with it unless you spend at least an hour learning how to use it.
              You can break or bend loopers and other fine parts that cost big $$$ if
              you don't know what you're doing. And learning to thread it from
              scratch can be quite daunting until you get the hang of it.

              Other than that Mrs Lincoln, I though the play a bit dull, until the
              last act....

              Ana

              >
              >
            • ~lisa.s
              Can this wondrous technique with any serger? I ve got an eleven year old Husqvarna and it would be the super if a sheering foot were available for the thing,
              Message 6 of 24 , Jul 23, 2004
              • 0 Attachment
                Can this wondrous technique with any serger? I've got an eleven year old
                Husqvarna and it would be the super if a sheering foot were available
                for the thing, and that it would work.

                ~lisa.s

                ---

                > I would die to have a good, fast, ruffling technique on my
                > serger.

                --
                * llsturts@...
              • Pierre & Sandy Pettinger
                KP, We also once had a cat (may she RIP) who loved to pull out pins - push pins from the bulletin board, straight pins from a pincushion or seam, whatever.
                Message 7 of 24 , Jul 23, 2004
                • 0 Attachment
                  KP,

                  We also once had a cat (may she RIP) who loved to pull out pins - push pins
                  from the bulletin board, straight pins from a pincushion or seam,
                  whatever. She then would bury them under the seat cushion in Hubby's
                  chair, or sometimes with the push pins, just drop them on the floor (so you
                  could find them with bare feet in the dark!!!) She also did this with the
                  very sharp pointy reflectors on the Xmas light bulbs. She was very
                  delicate about it and never injured herself on a pin. She lived to the
                  ripe old age of 17.

                  We currently have 5 cats, but also a large house, so we have separate
                  sewing rooms that are (mostly) no cat zones. Everything still ends up with
                  cat hair on it, though! :)

                  Sandy


                  At 01:46 AM 7/23/2004, you wrote:
                  >I came back from the bathroom to discover that he'd almost entirely
                  >unpinned both seams! Now I have to keep him out of the sewing room
                  >entirely -- but if he ever comes across a pincushion that I've forgotten
                  >to put back, I can count on his pulling them all out. I have no idea what
                  >caused this idiocy, and thank God he's never yet managed to hurt himself,
                  >but he is an annoying and much-beloved little weirdo!
                  >
                  >Cheers --
                  >KP

                  "Those Who Fail To Learn History
                  Are Doomed to Repeat It;
                  Those Who Fail To Learn History Correctly --
                  Why They Are Simply Doomed.

                  Achemdro'hm
                  "The Illusion of Historical Fact"
                  -- C.Y. 4971

                  Andromeda
                • Rici Tegarden
                  I had to get in on this one because I have 5 black cats who think my sewing room is their room. The solution to the kneading is called soft paws . They are
                  Message 8 of 24 , Jul 24, 2004
                  • 0 Attachment
                    I had to get in on this one because I have 5 black cats who think my sewing
                    room is their room. The solution to the kneading is called "soft paws".
                    They are covers for the claws you get from the vet. He will put them on for
                    you but they have to be redone every 4 weeks so I learned to do it myself.
                    The kitties are pretty good about it. I trim their claws and then apply the
                    claw covers with nail glue. They didn't like them at first but don't have
                    problems now. And they come in a variety of colors so your kitty can be
                    fashionable.
                    I keep most of my fabrics in dress bags in a closet with doors. My brother
                    made me some ladder like hangers from nylon rope and pvc pipe and I can put
                    4 pieces of about 4-5 yard each on one hanger in a bag. And I use plastic
                    tubs Also I found a sponge thingy at Joann's that removes the cat hair
                    pretty well. It works like the rubber gloves and the hair rolls off. I
                    warn everyone I sew for that I have cats and can't promise that all the cat
                    hair or "antigen"(what causes allergic reaction and cat antigen is very hard
                    to remove according to my allergist) will be removed from any garment I work
                    on.

                    Rici in WV who is up way to early this morning:)
                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: "Sylvia Rognstad" <sylvia@...>
                    To: <TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com>
                    Sent: Friday, July 23, 2004 10:37 AM
                    Subject: Re: [TheCostumersManifesto] Anyone got any cat proofing ideas?


                    I dont have a solution. I have the opposite problem. Light colored
                    cats and I work with black fabrics. A lot of net and tulle, which act
                    like magnets. I think I'm going to start putting a disclaimer on the
                    invoices I send out with my garments, since I know I can never get all
                    the cat hair off of them.

                    Sylrog

                    On Jul 22, 2004, at 11:49 PM, Heidi Hobson wrote:

                    > I have three cats, only one of them has managed to come to the
                    > realization that he isn't a kitten anymore. They all LOVE to curl up
                    > on fabric. They never fail to get into wherever/whatever they want to,
                    > either. We keep fabric in the garage, to keep them off it. Anybody got
                    > any ideas on cat proofin during a project? I ask because the one with
                    > the maturity is dark, and we use white satin on a lot of projects and
                    > our girl LOVES to knead! And no, we can't declaw her, she gets out
                    > from time to time and it would endanger her, and claw sheaths? Been
                    > there, done that, WAY too much hassle. So what next? We can't work
                    > with clawed fabric, and it is SO hard to get Sammy and Piccolo's
                    > darker fur off satin and velvet! PLEASE, any ideas. I've even had to
                    > keep my Prom Dress and White Satin Evening Gown in the Garage! Any
                    > ideas, please? Their adorable, but they are little troublemakers (most
                    > of the time Pumpkin doesn't even mean to cause trouble)!
                    >
                    > Dragon's eye wide,
                    > Heidi
                    >
                    >
                    > ---------------------------------
                    > Do you Yahoo!?
                    > New and Improved Yahoo! Mail - Send 10MB messages!
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
                    >
                    > ADVERTISEMENT
                    > <lrec_companion_043004.gif>
                    > <l.gif>
                    >
                    > Yahoo! Groups Links
                    >
                    > . To visit your group on the web, go to:
                    > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/TheCostumersManifesto/
                    >
                    > . To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                    > TheCostumersManifesto-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                    >
                    > . Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
                    > Service.
                    >
                    >

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                    Yahoo! Groups Links
                  • Heidi Hobson
                    We used those for a while, but Pumpkin did NOT approve, and we got sick of being scratched with and without the claw sheaths. Somebory mentioned a pillow, I
                    Message 9 of 24 , Jul 24, 2004
                    • 0 Attachment
                      We used those for a while, but Pumpkin did NOT approve, and we got sick of being scratched with and without the claw sheaths. Somebory mentioned a pillow, I think I'll try that. And the black cats (LUCKY, 5 cats), I sympathize. I've got a Siamese, a dark tabby and an orange tabby, no matter what color the fabric is, one of them has fur that shows!


                      ---------------------------------
                      Do you Yahoo!?
                      Y! Messenger - Communicate in real time. Download now.

                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.