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Re: [TheCostumersManifesto]Costume BO

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  • Alainngeal@aol.com
    ... smell remover from the pet store.  They are very effective on organically caused odors. Ana
    Message 1 of 6 , Jun 7, 2004
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      >> My girlfriend swears by "OUT!", an enzyme odor remover.  I'd use a urine
      smell remover from the pet store.  They are very effective on
      organically caused odors.

      Ana<<

      That's a great idea! I have an elderly cat who is either incontinent at
      times or very angry at me for some reason. LOL. I've used the pet and child
      safe odor removers with good success when she goes on my carpet or our beds (I
      know--eeewww). I loathe the strong orange scent that remains, but I also hate
      the chemical smell of Febreeze. I find that airing the item in question out in
      the sun after treatment helps remove the secondary odors.
      For those without pets, a "blacklight" is an excellent way to detect
      organic odor sources, especially urine. I'll have to test it on body odor. Oh
      boy, what a fun experiment. Heh.
      Thanks for the idea Ana--this has been a big problem when using
      secondhand clothes (which I love).

      ~Fairchild


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • bearhedded
      ... use a urine ... incontinent at ... pet and child ... carpet or our beds (I ... but I also hate ... question out in ... detect ... body odor. Oh ... using
      Message 2 of 6 , Jun 7, 2004
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        --- In TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com,
        Alainngeal@a... wrote:
        > >> My girlfriend swears by "OUT!", an enzyme odor remover.  I'd
        use a urine
        > smell remover from the pet store.  They are very effective on
        > organically caused odors.
        >
        > Ana<<
        >
        > That's a great idea! I have an elderly cat who is either
        incontinent at
        > times or very angry at me for some reason. LOL. I've used the
        pet and child
        > safe odor removers with good success when she goes on my
        carpet or our beds (I
        > know--eeewww). I loathe the strong orange scent that remains,
        but I also hate
        > the chemical smell of Febreeze. I find that airing the item in
        question out in
        > the sun after treatment helps remove the secondary odors.
        > For those without pets, a "blacklight" is an excellent way to
        detect
        > organic odor sources, especially urine. I'll have to test it on
        body odor. Oh
        > boy, what a fun experiment. Heh.
        > Thanks for the idea Ana--this has been a big problem when
        using
        > secondhand clothes (which I love).
        >
        > ~Fairchild
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • bearhedded
        We use Odorzout at the Children s theatre (odorzout.com) ...a powder that you sprinkle on, then brush or vacuum off... but I m wondering if you may be
        Message 3 of 6 , Jun 7, 2004
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          We use 'Odorzout' at the Children's theatre (odorzout.com) ...a
          powder that you sprinkle on, then brush or vacuum off... but I'm
          wondering if you may be dealing with a garment made of a
          synthetic that is decomposing. I have come across several
          examples of garments/ fabrics from the late 60's, early 70's that
          produced a really unpleasant sour odor, seemingly all by
          themselves. They were usually nubby plaids, imitating wool,
          that I think were acetates. Nothing got the smell out...had to
          toss 'em!

          BH
        • Michelle Davidson
          Thank you, all--I knew I could count on you! I will try everything and let you know what happens, but I have a sinking feeling that Bearhedded is right and I
          Message 4 of 6 , Jun 7, 2004
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            Thank you, all--I knew I could count on you! I will
            try everything and let you know what happens, but I
            have a sinking feeling that Bearhedded is right and I
            have a synthetic that is decomposing. It is actually
            a nubby solid imitaing wool and the smell is quite
            unbelievable, plus I think it is reacting to the
            actress's natural body oils and making something even
            more atrocious! We are already at work making a new
            costume. We open tomorrow, so it may be a long
            night...Thanks again. --Michelle

            --- bearhedded <bearhedded@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            > We use 'Odorzout' at the Children's theatre
            > (odorzout.com) ...a
            > powder that you sprinkle on, then brush or vacuum
            > off... but I'm
            > wondering if you may be dealing with a garment made
            > of a
            > synthetic that is decomposing. I have come across
            > several
            > examples of garments/ fabrics from the late 60's,
            > early 70's that
            > produced a really unpleasant sour odor, seemingly
            > all by
            > themselves. They were usually nubby plaids,
            > imitating wool,
            > that I think were acetates. Nothing got the smell
            > out...had to
            > toss 'em!
            >
            > BH
            >
            >


            =====
            The people who cast the votes decide nothing. The people who count the votes decide everything.
            --Josef Stalin




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          • Alainngeal@aol.com
            Not to be gross, but what about some essential oils to cover the odor? A tiny dab of patchouli (or a thousand other scents) might make the difference on stage.
            Message 5 of 6 , Jun 7, 2004
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              Not to be gross, but what about some essential oils to cover the odor? A tiny
              dab of patchouli (or a thousand other scents) might make the difference on
              stage. Obviously few people want to go around reeking of strong scents, but it
              could help temporarily.

              ~Fairchild


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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