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Re: [TheCostumersManifesto] Opinions on Linings

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  • Michele Milunas
    Thank you very much for the info on the linings! I did see dresses made from viscose rayon on the www.swingstyle.de site. This is a German-based website with
    Message 1 of 5 , May 19, 2004
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      Thank you very much for the info on the linings!

      I did see dresses made from viscose rayon on the www.swingstyle.de site. This is a German-based website with lots of great info on WWII German clothing. Definitely worth checking out:-)) But I wasn't sure if they used viscose or rayon to line things, or whether cotton was more readily available and cheap.

      I knew that they didn't use silk cause my Mom was employed in a silk parachute factory during the war.

      Michele
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Sherman, Talley and Raymond
      To: TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Monday, May 17, 2004 11:09 PM
      Subject: Re: [TheCostumersManifesto] Opinions on Linings


      To be authentic, you need to remember that t didnt matter if it was german or US. Dress uniforms like many clothes from the 40s" was lined with viscose or rayon.
      Silk was too expensive as it was still being used for aprachutes and cottons were used for feed bags so that too was rationed to but a few yards, and that was used for underwear or night garments.

      Rayon and viscose was mor ereadily available and wasnt rationed to the etxtent of other textiles.
      Soladies to be authentic remember viscose or rayon,

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Michele Milunas
      To: TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Monday, May 17, 2004 5:50 AM
      Subject: Re: [TheCostumersManifesto] Opinions on Linings


      Hello Kate,

      Thank you for your reply! It seems that I'm having to learn as I go;-)) I can see the advantages to lining the jacket now. For some reason, the wool-blend fabric that I bought frays quite a bit and, although I "pink" it, I don't like to use pinking sheers. There are also places that I can't use that technique.

      I have been researching linings and they do seem like mini-versions of the item to be lined. The jackets that I am making are grey, so I bought black "slippery" lining fabric, but it seems a bit dark. I have plenty of lightweight cotton and think that cotton would be more authentic for a WWII German ladies' uniform.

      You didn't ramble, by any means, and I really appreciate your detailed and knowledgable information!

      Thanks again,
      Michele
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: K Murphy
      To: TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Sunday, May 16, 2004 10:04 PM
      Subject: Re: [TheCostumersManifesto] Opinions on Linings


      Hi Michele:

      The main reasons for lining a wool jacket include:
      a) comfort for the wearer -- keeping wool off the skin
      b) longevity for the garment -- keeping body soils/wear off the wool
      c) creating a slippery surface to help in slipping the garment off and on and to help it hang properly without "sticking" to garments worn underneath (this is why most linings are made of slippery fabric)
      d) the ability to create "invisible" hems, as the lining fabric is stitched to the wool that's folded up, not the wool "face" of the garment, and
      e) the ability to hide underlinings and padding.

      In this particular case, for dual duty as summer wear, you might want to use a very light-weight cotton, which eliminates the "slippery" factor but doubles the breathable (summer comfort) factor. I don't know how old the daughter is, but it could be she'll grow out of this garment before next summer rolls around anyway!

      In my opinion, if you "bag out" (i.e., sew around the edges and then turn right-side out like a bag) a jacket it's easier to make it lined than unlined, because you eliminate the need to finish the seams and do hems. You'll also hide the shoulder pads and any horsehair, etc. The only hand-sewn work should be to hem the cuffs to the lining and finish a short section of the center back (left open for turning).

      If you haven't done a lot of linings, don't be intimidated! I'd recommend that you look at as many sewing books (at the library, friends' houses, etc.) as you can, and read the pattern directions for as many lined jackets as you can find. There are TONS of different methods of lining a jacket -- some overly complicated, some extremely simplified, and everyone develops their own style through experience.

      It always helps me to think of the lining as just a slightly smaller version of the jacket that sits (inside-out) inside the jacket. When I'm making garments that I know will get minimal use (say, vests or jackets that will only be used for one show) I actually eliminate any extra facings and cut my lining from exactly the same pattern pieces as the face fabric -- with only an additional piece of face fabric for the revers or lapels. I bag the whole thing out around the outside edges and turn it. Really fast, really simple. All you lose is some strength around the neckline, which you can always reinforce with twill tape or a small section of interfacing before turning.

      I'll stop rambling now and hope this helps.

      Kate Murphy


      Michele Milunas <drkfrau@...> wrote:
      Hello All,

      I am sewing light wool suits for a mother and daughter. The jacket is double-breasted and calls for a lining. Is it necessary to line all jackets? What would be the best fabric for a light wool jacket? They may be worn in the summer time, which is why I'm using a lighter wool than worsted and am wondering about lining it. They are also 1940's vintage-style.

      Also, what is the best method: the "speed-lining" machine-sewn or hand-sewn?

      Michele


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