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Re: [TheCostumersManifesto] Digest Number 937

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  • Kristina L. Esch
    Vinegar and steam will help with the hoop burn. Also brush lightly as you are steaming. ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    Message 1 of 3 , Apr 7, 2004
    • 0 Attachment
      Vinegar and steam will help with the hoop burn. Also brush lightly as you are steaming.

      TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com wrote:

      >
      > There are 4 messages in this issue.
      >
      > Topics in this digest:
      >
      > 1. Re: Hoop Impressions on Velvet
      > From: "Kim Carlson" <singitgirl@...>
      > 2. Re: Cleaning lace
      > From: Chris <emeraldepona@...>
      > 3. Re: Digest Number 935
      > From: Curtis Kidd <gckidd@...>
      > 4. Re: Digest Number 934
      > From: "bearhedded" <bearhedded@...>
      >
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      >
      > Message: 1
      > Date: Tue, 06 Apr 2004 15:11:48 -0000
      > From: "Kim Carlson" <singitgirl@...>
      > Subject: Re: Hoop Impressions on Velvet
      >
      > Here's something I found on a website. Perhaps it can help you:
      >
      > Hoop burn is the unsightly ring mark on the fabric caused by forcing
      > the garment into the hoop. Gently steaming the affected area with a
      > steam iron or steamer or lightly spraying the area with Magic Sizing
      > can remove mild hoop burn (Magic Sizing® is available in the laundry
      > supplies section of the grocery store.) Severe hoop burn is permanent
      > damage to the fabric.
      >
      > End quote.
      >
      > May I suggest that if you have any more embroidery done on velvet,
      > that you ask the embroiderer to "baste" the velvet onto the
      > stabilizer instead of hooping it. There are special machine baste
      > files that can help hold the fabric in place while embroidering,
      > thereby saving the fabric from hoop burn.
      >
      > I've found (through extensive testing) that the only fabric I feel
      > comfortable hooping is cotton or cotton/poly blends. This is what I
      > do for all other fabrics: hoop the stabilizer ONLY, then using a shot
      > of fabric adhesive on the stabilizer, I place the fabric on top of
      > the hooped stabilizer and run a machine basting stitch around the
      > perimeter and as a large X through the center of the hoop. Once this
      > is all in place, I begin the embroidery process. When finished,
      > carefully remove the basting stitches and viola! no hoop burn!
      >
      > Kim C
      > --- In TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com, "Rae" <raedowning@j...>
      > wrote:
      > > I had silk velvet (30% silk/70% rayon) professionally embroidered
      > > onto the cut pieces. However, the hoop crushed some of the velvet
      > > leaving a distinct outline of the hoop. The embroiderer told me
      > > about it saying, "I hope you know how to get those removed" and
      > that
      > > was it. I don't. Any suggestions.
      > >
      > > Rae
      >
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      >
      > Message: 2
      > Date: Tue, 6 Apr 2004 08:20:44 -0700 (PDT)
      > From: Chris <emeraldepona@...>
      > Subject: Re: Cleaning lace
      >
      > Hi :)
      >
      > I soak my finds in OxiClean. I find it works very well. I soak until the stains are gone, anywhere from 1-5 hours. I've used it on all types of lace, cotton, man-made fibers, etc. The only thing you should NOT soak in OC is SILK! Bad idea as I found out... Gently rinse in a sink of cool water, roll in a towel and gently press exess water and dry flat.
      >
      > I've done this with 100+ year-old lace and it's come out looking beautiful.
      >
      > Hope this is helpfull.
      >
      > Chris :)
      >
      > lanorte1@... wrote:
      > I have a lace collar - probably 1930's or 40's vintage - that I picked up at
      > an antique store. It has a couple of bad brown stains on it. Any suggestions
      > as to how I can safely clean it, especially since I don't know what the stain
      > is or know the fiber content of the lace?
      >
      > I'd appreciate any suggestions anyone could offer.
      >
      > Donna
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      > ---------------------------------
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      > To visit your group on the web, go to:
      > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/TheCostumersManifesto/
      >
      > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
      > TheCostumersManifesto-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
      >
      > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.
      >
      > ---------------------------------
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      > Yahoo! Small Business $15K Web Design Giveaway - Enter today
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      >
      > Message: 3
      > Date: Tue, 6 Apr 2004 17:25:17 -0700 (PDT)
      > From: Curtis Kidd <gckidd@...>
      > Subject: Re: Digest Number 935
      >
      > > From: sylvia@...
      > > Subject: Re: Digest Number 934
      > >
      > > Nothing will dye polyester except disperse dyes, which I
      > > think you can
      > > order from Dharma or Pro Chem, but I believe it's still
      > > very difficult,
      > > requiring extremely high temps and they are rather toxic.
      > > I wouldn't
      > > recommend it.
      >
      > That's what I was afraid of (also what I was expecting to
      > hear, but I promised I would ask around and see if I could
      > find anything that would work). Thanks all the same,
      > though.
      >
      > =====
      > Curtis Kidd
      > "Remember, the light at the end of the tunnel could be you!"
      >
      > *********************************************************
      > "One World, One Web, One Program" - Microsoft promo ad
      > "Ein Volk, Ein Reich, Ein Fuhrer" - Adolf Hitler
      > *********************************************************
      >
      > __________________________________
      > Do you Yahoo!?
      > Yahoo! Small Business $15K Web Design Giveaway
      > http://promotions.yahoo.com/design_giveaway/
      >
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      >
      > Message: 4
      > Date: Wed, 07 Apr 2004 01:09:11 -0000
      > From: "bearhedded" <bearhedded@...>
      > Subject: Re: Digest Number 934
      >
      > ...but polyester will at least tint with union (household) dye, and
      > acetate takes it pretty well....convince the lighting designer to
      > push the pink (brownies usually do the trick), and you MAY still
      > be in business!
      >
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      >
      > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > ------------------------------------------------------------------------


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Curtis Kidd
      ... Heh...well, I told the production designer that poly doesn t dye very well, she had heard the same thing but was hoping I knew or had access to some
      Message 2 of 3 , Apr 7, 2004
      • 0 Attachment
        > From: "bearhedded" <bearhedded@...>
        > Subject: Re: Digest Number 934
        >
        > ...but polyester will at least tint with union
        > (household) dye, and
        > acetate takes it pretty well....convince the lighting
        > designer to
        > push the pink (brownies usually do the trick), and you
        > MAY still
        > be in business!

        Heh...well, I told the production designer that poly
        doesn't dye very well, she had heard the same thing but was
        hoping I knew or had access to some magical method. Once I
        shot down that hope, she decided that the white suits would
        work just fine, she'd just have to find a more colorful top
        to wear underneath the coat. Have to save the bribery and
        arm-twisting for those really crucial items that aren't so
        easily resolved...;)

        Thanks, though, we may still end up trying something (at
        this point, we're still not positive we'll be using the
        suits...the girls who wore them originally were all very
        small and petite, while the girls who are in the show this
        year are a little more filled out--there's a chance they
        may not even fit. We'll see just how much alteration
        they're going to require and whether or not the designer
        still wants to use them once she sees them on bodies.


        =====
        Curtis Kidd
        "Remember, the light at the end of the tunnel could be you!"

        *********************************************************
        "One World, One Web, One Program" - Microsoft promo ad
        "Ein Volk, Ein Reich, Ein Fuhrer" - Adolf Hitler
        *********************************************************

        __________________________________
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        Yahoo! Small Business $15K Web Design Giveaway
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      • peggy salvail
        Will this technique work and creased or wrinkeled Velvet. My dauhgters dress had an over bodice and it creased the under dress very bad while she was wearing
        Message 3 of 3 , Apr 8, 2004
        • 0 Attachment
          Will this technique work and creased or wrinkeled Velvet. My dauhgters
          dress had an over bodice and it creased the under dress very bad while she
          was wearing it. Any suggestions in getting it out? Take care Peggy


          --- "Kristina L. Esch" <costumes@...> wrote:
          > Vinegar and steam will help with the hoop burn. Also brush lightly as
          > you are steaming.
          >
          > TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com wrote:
          >
          > >
          > > There are 4 messages in this issue.
          > >
          > > Topics in this digest:
          > >
          > > 1. Re: Hoop Impressions on Velvet
          > > From: "Kim Carlson" <singitgirl@...>
          > > 2. Re: Cleaning lace
          > > From: Chris <emeraldepona@...>
          > > 3. Re: Digest Number 935
          > > From: Curtis Kidd <gckidd@...>
          > > 4. Re: Digest Number 934
          > > From: "bearhedded" <bearhedded@...>
          > >
          > >
          > ________________________________________________________________________
          > >
          > ________________________________________________________________________
          > >
          > > Message: 1
          > > Date: Tue, 06 Apr 2004 15:11:48 -0000
          > > From: "Kim Carlson" <singitgirl@...>
          > > Subject: Re: Hoop Impressions on Velvet
          > >
          > > Here's something I found on a website. Perhaps it can help you:
          > >
          > > Hoop burn is the unsightly ring mark on the fabric caused by forcing
          > > the garment into the hoop. Gently steaming the affected area with a
          > > steam iron or steamer or lightly spraying the area with Magic Sizing
          > > can remove mild hoop burn (Magic Sizing´┐Ż is available in the laundry
          > > supplies section of the grocery store.) Severe hoop burn is permanent
          > > damage to the fabric.
          > >
          > > End quote.
          > >
          > > May I suggest that if you have any more embroidery done on velvet,
          > > that you ask the embroiderer to "baste" the velvet onto the
          > > stabilizer instead of hooping it. There are special machine baste
          > > files that can help hold the fabric in place while embroidering,
          > > thereby saving the fabric from hoop burn.
          > >
          > > I've found (through extensive testing) that the only fabric I feel
          > > comfortable hooping is cotton or cotton/poly blends. This is what I
          > > do for all other fabrics: hoop the stabilizer ONLY, then using a shot
          > > of fabric adhesive on the stabilizer, I place the fabric on top of
          > > the hooped stabilizer and run a machine basting stitch around the
          > > perimeter and as a large X through the center of the hoop. Once this
          > > is all in place, I begin the embroidery process. When finished,
          > > carefully remove the basting stitches and viola! no hoop burn!
          > >
          > > Kim C
          > > --- In TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com, "Rae" <raedowning@j...>
          > > wrote:
          > > > I had silk velvet (30% silk/70% rayon) professionally embroidered
          > > > onto the cut pieces. However, the hoop crushed some of the velvet
          > > > leaving a distinct outline of the hoop. The embroiderer told me
          > > > about it saying, "I hope you know how to get those removed" and
          > > that
          > > > was it. I don't. Any suggestions.
          > > >
          > > > Rae
          > >
          > >
          > ________________________________________________________________________
          > >
          > ________________________________________________________________________
          > >
          > > Message: 2
          > > Date: Tue, 6 Apr 2004 08:20:44 -0700 (PDT)
          > > From: Chris <emeraldepona@...>
          > > Subject: Re: Cleaning lace
          > >
          > > Hi :)
          > >
          > > I soak my finds in OxiClean. I find it works very well. I soak until
          > the stains are gone, anywhere from 1-5 hours. I've used it on all types
          > of lace, cotton, man-made fibers, etc. The only thing you should NOT
          > soak in OC is SILK! Bad idea as I found out... Gently rinse in a sink
          > of cool water, roll in a towel and gently press exess water and dry
          > flat.
          > >
          > > I've done this with 100+ year-old lace and it's come out looking
          > beautiful.
          > >
          > > Hope this is helpfull.
          > >
          > > Chris :)
          > >
          > > lanorte1@... wrote:
          > > I have a lace collar - probably 1930's or 40's vintage - that I picked
          > up at
          > > an antique store. It has a couple of bad brown stains on it. Any
          > suggestions
          > > as to how I can safely clean it, especially since I don't know what
          > the stain
          > > is or know the fiber content of the lace?
          > >
          > > I'd appreciate any suggestions anyone could offer.
          > >
          > > Donna
          > >
          > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > >
          > > ---------------------------------
          > > Yahoo! Groups Links
          > >
          > > To visit your group on the web, go to:
          > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/TheCostumersManifesto/
          > >
          > > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
          > > TheCostumersManifesto-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          > >
          > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
          > Service.
          > >
          > > ---------------------------------
          > > Do you Yahoo!?
          > > Yahoo! Small Business $15K Web Design Giveaway - Enter today
          > >
          > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > >
          > >
          > ________________________________________________________________________
          > >
          > ________________________________________________________________________
          > >
          > > Message: 3
          > > Date: Tue, 6 Apr 2004 17:25:17 -0700 (PDT)
          > > From: Curtis Kidd <gckidd@...>
          > > Subject: Re: Digest Number 935
          > >
          > > > From: sylvia@...
          > > > Subject: Re: Digest Number 934
          > > >
          > > > Nothing will dye polyester except disperse dyes, which I
          > > > think you can
          > > > order from Dharma or Pro Chem, but I believe it's still
          > > > very difficult,
          > > > requiring extremely high temps and they are rather toxic.
          > > > I wouldn't
          > > > recommend it.
          > >
          > > That's what I was afraid of (also what I was expecting to
          > > hear, but I promised I would ask around and see if I could
          > > find anything that would work). Thanks all the same,
          > > though.
          > >
          > > =====
          > > Curtis Kidd
          > > "Remember, the light at the end of the tunnel could be you!"
          > >
          > > *********************************************************
          > > "One World, One Web, One Program" - Microsoft promo ad
          > > "Ein Volk, Ein Reich, Ein Fuhrer" - Adolf Hitler
          > > *********************************************************
          > >
          > > __________________________________
          > > Do you Yahoo!?
          > > Yahoo! Small Business $15K Web Design Giveaway
          > > http://promotions.yahoo.com/design_giveaway/
          > >
          > >
          > ________________________________________________________________________
          > >
          > ________________________________________________________________________
          > >
          > > Message: 4
          > > Date: Wed, 07 Apr 2004 01:09:11 -0000
          > > From: "bearhedded" <bearhedded@...>
          > > Subject: Re: Digest Number 934
          > >
          > > ...but polyester will at least tint with union (household) dye, and
          > > acetate takes it pretty well....convince the lighting designer to
          > > push the pink (brownies usually do the trick), and you MAY still
          > > be in business!
          > >
          > >
          > ________________________________________________________________________
          > >
          > ________________________________________________________________________
          > >
          > >
          > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
          > > Yahoo! Groups Links
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >


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