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Hoop Impressions on Velvet

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  • Rae
    I had silk velvet (30% silk/70% rayon) professionally embroidered onto the cut pieces. However, the hoop crushed some of the velvet leaving a distinct
    Message 1 of 5 , Apr 5 1:36 PM
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      I had silk velvet (30% silk/70% rayon) professionally embroidered
      onto the cut pieces. However, the hoop crushed some of the velvet
      leaving a distinct outline of the hoop. The embroiderer told me
      about it saying, "I hope you know how to get those removed" and that
      was it. I don't. Any suggestions.

      Rae
    • Kim Carlson
      Here s something I found on a website. Perhaps it can help you: Hoop burn is the unsightly ring mark on the fabric caused by forcing the garment into the hoop.
      Message 2 of 5 , Apr 6 8:11 AM
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        Here's something I found on a website. Perhaps it can help you:

        Hoop burn is the unsightly ring mark on the fabric caused by forcing
        the garment into the hoop. Gently steaming the affected area with a
        steam iron or steamer or lightly spraying the area with Magic Sizing
        can remove mild hoop burn (Magic SizingĀ® is available in the laundry
        supplies section of the grocery store.) Severe hoop burn is permanent
        damage to the fabric.

        End quote.

        May I suggest that if you have any more embroidery done on velvet,
        that you ask the embroiderer to "baste" the velvet onto the
        stabilizer instead of hooping it. There are special machine baste
        files that can help hold the fabric in place while embroidering,
        thereby saving the fabric from hoop burn.

        I've found (through extensive testing) that the only fabric I feel
        comfortable hooping is cotton or cotton/poly blends. This is what I
        do for all other fabrics: hoop the stabilizer ONLY, then using a shot
        of fabric adhesive on the stabilizer, I place the fabric on top of
        the hooped stabilizer and run a machine basting stitch around the
        perimeter and as a large X through the center of the hoop. Once this
        is all in place, I begin the embroidery process. When finished,
        carefully remove the basting stitches and viola! no hoop burn!

        Kim C
        --- In TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com, "Rae" <raedowning@j...>
        wrote:
        > I had silk velvet (30% silk/70% rayon) professionally embroidered
        > onto the cut pieces. However, the hoop crushed some of the velvet
        > leaving a distinct outline of the hoop. The embroiderer told me
        > about it saying, "I hope you know how to get those removed" and
        that
        > was it. I don't. Any suggestions.
        >
        > Rae
      • mborzoi
        ... that ... While working at the U of Iowa we worked on silk velvet at times. What we used to remove crush was a pin board & a steam iron. It takes patience,
        Message 3 of 5 , Apr 6 8:32 AM
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          --- In TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com, "Rae" <raedowning@j...>
          wrote:
          > I had silk velvet (30% silk/70% rayon) professionally embroidered
          > onto the cut pieces. However, the hoop crushed some of the velvet
          > leaving a distinct outline of the hoop. The embroiderer told me
          > about it saying, "I hope you know how to get those removed" and
          that
          > was it. I don't. Any suggestions.
          >
          > Rae

          While working at the U of Iowa we worked on silk velvet at times.
          What we used to remove crush was a pin board & a steam iron. It takes
          patience, but it can undo quite a bit. Put the fabric face down on
          the pin board & steam it from the back. Occasionally shift & kinda
          jiggle the fabric to encourage the velvet fibers into standing back
          up. If you're doing alot of work on velvet, the pin board is a
          necessity.

          Michelle
        • K Murphy
          Rae: I would say there s nothing professional about someone ruining your velvet. Anyone who works with fabric knows you re not even supposed to FOLD velvet,
          Message 4 of 5 , Apr 7 1:22 PM
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            Rae:

            I would say there's nothing "professional" about someone ruining your velvet. Anyone who works with fabric knows you're not even supposed to FOLD velvet, much less clamp it in a hoop! Some velvets are so delicate that they can be ruined just by being caught in the rain.

            The only way I can imagine that you could salvage the pieces you had this person embroider would be to create some additional patterning in the nap that might disguise the hoop rings. I have seen kits of weights that are sold to permanantly crush patterns into the nap of velvet.

            Other than that, I'd say it's time to ask the "professional" for your money (plus the cost of the velvet) back.

            Kate Murphy



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          • bearhedded
            I agree, you SHOULD get your money back. Do you have scraps of the velvet to experiment on, or can you get another yard to play with? In addition to all the
            Message 5 of 5 , Apr 9 12:04 PM
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              I agree, you SHOULD get your money back.

              Do you have scraps of the velvet to experiment on, or can you get
              another yard to play with?

              In addition to all the previous suggestions, may I offer up a few I
              have seen over the years?

              A friend restored the nap to her COTTON velvet pants by putting
              them in the dryer (dry) with a couple of damp towels, after trying
              to steam them failed.

              An alternative to a velvet needleboard is that scratchy mohair
              upholstery fabric. Expensive, sure, but leaves much less
              impression on your fabric, is much larger than a needleboard,
              and can be draped over a seam sausage easily, tapering
              everthing else away from the iron's surface. (Check out
              teddybear makers supply places, like Edinburgh Imports.)

              Velvet can be embossed (if all else fails) with a number of
              different things. Lace laid over a towel (or needleboard) on your
              ironing table, makes a surface on which the velvet can be
              placed, face down, and pressed, leaving the imprint in the nap
              more or less permanantly.
              Batic blocks, linoleum print blocks (we had a shop FULL of little
              velvet squares of Munch's "The Scream"!), and fancy woodworker
              supply places carry embossed wooden appliques for furniture
              that impress patterns in the nap, too. These don't require a
              special surface, but you have to be careful that the iron goes
              straight up and down in the process, or you can get impressions
              of the sole plate. They're also made with steam and pressure,
              so they may expand.

              Best of luck!

              BH

              (You can think of it as your lemonade dress!)
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