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Re: [TheCostumersManifesto] Digest Number 934

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  • Curtis Kidd
    ... I ve always negotiated a flat fee for designing...how generous the fee was had a lot to do with how much time I was willing to spend pondering what I
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 2, 2004
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      > From: K Murphy <costumerkate@...>
      > Subject: Re: Advice on Charges for designing
      >
      > Syl:
      >
      > Well...the kinda kidding answer would be, "I don't think
      > you can charge for having the brain of an artist!" But I
      > do include my "thinking time" in the "research" category,
      > and I do charge for it. I just don't list it on the
      > invoice as "Long hot bath with glass of well-aged Pomerol
      > and 'The Busby Berkely Book' balanced on knees....$75.00"
      >
      >
      > Kate Murphy
      >
      > sylvia@... wrote:
      > >
      > > Great input. Just one question: How do you charge for
      > the time your
      > right brain spends designing? My best ideas come to me
      > when I'm lying
      > down or driving the car. Do you charge for those times?
      > I'm kinda
      > kidding and kinda not.

      I've always negotiated a flat fee for designing...how
      generous the fee was had a lot to do with how much time I
      was willing to spend pondering what I wanted to design.
      It's also important to get them to understand that the
      design fee has got to be based on how many costumes being
      designed, and not how many performers are being costumed
      (it's one thing to design five costumes, it's another thing
      altogether to design multiple costumes for five
      performers). I agree, though...I always seem to get my
      best inspiration at really odd times (I did most of my
      brain work for my playwriting classes while I was stocking
      the cooler when I was working in a convenience store...)

      > From: "dollywollydoodle2" <lattavol@...>
      > Subject: color bleeding after dying
      >
      > I always seem to have trouble with the color bleeding
      > after I have
      > dyed a fabric with Rit or similar dyes. I want to dye a
      > very heavy
      > loosely woven cotton fabric, but I don't want to run into
      > trouble
      > with bleeding and rub-off. Does anyone have any advice
      > they could
      > offer? I must be doing something wrong or those dye
      > companies would
      > have gone out of business long ago!

      I've had the same problem happen a time or two...the worst
      was one time (very early on) when I didn't get the water
      hot enough...the crystals didn't dissolve completely, so
      the first time I washed the garment in question, they
      finished dissolving and gave the whole thing a purplish
      cast (lucky for me it was a tie-dyed shirt, and it was only
      for me). Hot water dye, followed by a cold-water
      rinse--add salt to the dye bath, that also helps. I
      haven't had to try vinegar in the rinse yet.

      While we're on the subject of dyeing, I've got a
      question...and I'm afraid I have to admit it's about
      something we've already discussed several times in the time
      I've been on here (teach me to start taking notes when I'm
      reading this list!!!) For one of our shows this summer,
      the designer wants to take some women's suits we have in
      stock (white) and dye them to a vivid rose pink. The suits
      are a polyester/acetate blend. Anyone have a good dye for
      that? I've not been terribly impressed with Rit's ability
      to dye poly blends (except poly-cotton, and then only when
      the cotton is the majority of the fiber).

      Thanks in advance for any help that can be offered!


      =====
      Curtis Kidd
      "Remember, the light at the end of the tunnel could be you!"

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    • sylvia@ntw.net
      ... Nothing will dye polyester except disperse dyes, which I think you can order from Dharma or Pro Chem, but I believe it s still very difficult, requiring
      Message 2 of 4 , Apr 2, 2004
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        >
        > While we're on the subject of dyeing, I've got a
        > question...and I'm afraid I have to admit it's about
        > something we've already discussed several times in the time
        > I've been on here (teach me to start taking notes when I'm
        > reading this list!!!) For one of our shows this summer,
        > the designer wants to take some women's suits we have in
        > stock (white) and dye them to a vivid rose pink. The suits
        > are a polyester/acetate blend. Anyone have a good dye for
        > that? I've not been terribly impressed with Rit's ability
        > to dye poly blends (except poly-cotton, and then only when
        > the cotton is the majority of the fiber).
        >

        Nothing will dye polyester except disperse dyes, which I think you can
        order from Dharma or Pro Chem, but I believe it's still very difficult,
        requiring extremely high temps and they are rather toxic. I wouldn't
        recommend it.

        Sylrog
        >
      • mborzoi
        ... Have you tried the fabric spray paints available at the craft stores? I think they are more intended for floral arrangements. I ve used them several times
        Message 3 of 4 , Apr 5, 2004
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          --- In TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com, Curtis Kidd

          > While we're on the subject of dyeing, I've got a
          > question...and I'm afraid I have to admit it's about
          > something we've already discussed several times in the time
          > I've been on here (teach me to start taking notes when I'm
          > reading this list!!!) For one of our shows this summer,
          > the designer wants to take some women's suits we have in
          > stock (white) and dye them to a vivid rose pink. The suits
          > are a polyester/acetate blend. Anyone have a good dye for
          > that? I've not been terribly impressed with Rit's ability
          > to dye poly blends (except poly-cotton, and then only when
          > the cotton is the majority of the fiber).
          >
          > Thanks in advance for any help that can be offered!
          >
          >
          > =====
          > Curtis Kidd
          > "Remember, the light at the end of the tunnel could be you!"
          >


          Have you tried the fabric spray paints available at the craft stores?
          I think they are more intended for floral arrangements. I've used
          them several times to "distress" fabrics, but they may also work for
          polyester clothing. I realise it will take several cans & you
          definately need to test it first, but it certaining worked on the
          polyester and acrylics that I've done light coats on.

          Michelle
        • bearhedded
          ...but polyester will at least tint with union (household) dye, and acetate takes it pretty well....convince the lighting designer to push the pink (brownies
          Message 4 of 4 , Apr 6, 2004
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            ...but polyester will at least tint with union (household) dye, and
            acetate takes it pretty well....convince the lighting designer to
            push the pink (brownies usually do the trick), and you MAY still
            be in business!
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