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Re: [TheCostumersManifesto] Digest Number 921

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  • Curtis Kidd
    ... Depending on how much detail you re going to put into the project, smaller may even be worse that full-size. The margin for error is pretty slim. ... Not
    Message 1 of 2 , Mar 18, 2004
      > From: "Koumori" <sparrow@...>
      > Subject: Re: first sewing project
      >
      > Period children's outfits generally aren't any simpler
      > than adults',
      > since for most of the periods you are thinking of,
      > children dressed
      > largely the same as their elders, and the only thing
      > you'll be doing
      > is giving yourself smaller pieces to work with.

      Depending on how much detail you're going to put into the
      project, smaller may even be worse that full-size. The
      margin for error is pretty slim.

      > <ladyreikos@y...> wrote:
      > > Let me think, pretty much every costume drama I see I
      > would like to
      > try to make a few of there costumes for men, women and
      > child. Here's
      > a few I remember of the top my head
      > >
      > > Brotherhood of the Wolf
      > > Plunkett and Macleane
      > > Dangerous Beauty

      Not familiar with those, can't make any recommendations one
      way or the other...

      > > Interview with a Vampire

      Wow...where to begin? You've got a great variety of
      material to look at in this one...but if you're really
      going to do it right, the material is going to be VERY
      expensive and some of the pieces are incredibly demanding.
      Whatever you choose to do, if it's really your first
      serious project, I'd recommend making a mock-up from muslin
      or some other cheap fabric before you cut into your really
      nice material.

      > > Titus
      > > Vatel

      Don't know them...

      > > Lord of the Rings

      Heh...once again, where would you like to start on that
      one? There's a massive selection of projects, many of
      which are actually fairly simple (depending on how detailed
      you want to get with the trimmings).

      > > & one's I haven't seen yet
      > > Barry Lyndon
      > > Gormenhast

      Don't know them...

      > > Dangerous Liaisons

      Beautiful costumes, definitely NOT a good first-project
      choice (we did a production of it a few years ago at Utah
      State, the costumes were incredibly demanding for an
      experienced costume crew!)

      Some others to look at (some of them are really tricky to
      find!)...

      Restoration
      The Scarlet Pimpernel (w/Jane Seymour)
      The Three Musketeers (the Richard Lester version, not the

      Disney mutilation of the story...which also has some fun
      costumes, even if there are appalling errors in the
      period
      costumes), also The Four Musketeers (the second half of
      the Dumas novel)
      Braveheart (if you like earlier periods)
      Moulin Rouge
      My Man Godfrey (some great late 20's/early 30's stuff!)

      and there are a lot of others that have fun period-ish
      costumes. I'm sure there is a much longer list of good
      period films (Elizabeth and Shakespeare in Love come to
      mind, Pride and Prejudice, etc etc etc). Which project
      would be best all really depends on which period is your
      preference...I do have to agree that, unless you've already
      got someone who's going to take the costume off your hands,
      you should make something for yourself (for one thing,
      you'll be able to try it on and make sure it fits
      properly). If you start getting into making costumes,
      you'll find yourself surrendering a lot fo closet space,
      and it doesn't make much sense (to me) to dedicate space to
      costumes you can't even use (like a kid's costume, unless
      you've got a kid to wear it).

      One big advantage to making a costume for someone else,
      from a learning standpoint...it's much easier to make
      alterations when you can put the costume on a body and step
      back to get a good look at it. Pinning costumes on your
      own body can be incredibly tricky (and a real test of how
      limber you truly are). Once you get a little more
      experience on how everything fits together, you can look at
      something in the mirror and note that side seams need to
      come in another quarter-inch, etc...but until you get
      familiar with how everything goes together and how
      alterations affect the overall fit, it's a lot easier to
      pin the adjustments on someone else.

      My two bits (and change...)


      =====
      Curtis Kidd
      "Remember, the light at the end of the tunnel could be you!"

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    • K Murphy
      What about a cape for a first project? A simple one, with no armholes. They tend to have only two or three pattern pieces and very few details. A good way
      Message 2 of 2 , Mar 19, 2004
        What about a cape for a first project? A simple one, with no armholes. They tend to have only two or three pattern pieces and very few details. A good way to get your feet wet and there are some excellent patterns out there. Then you could wear it with the things you'll make in the future.

        Kate Murphy



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