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Re: [TheCostumersManifesto] Resumes

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  • K Murphy
    When I look at resumes I want to know exactly what a person can do and what it looks like when they re done. I m less concerned with exactly which shows
    Message 1 of 12 , Mar 1 8:58 PM
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      When I look at resumes I want to know exactly what a person can do and what it looks like when they're done. I'm less concerned with exactly which shows they've done or where/when they went to school.

      References are extremely important. I never interview anyone for whom I can't get at least two positive verbal references in advance.

      Kate Murphy

      She has been advised to create skills-based
      resumes with descriptions of what she has accomplished on previous jobs.
      It seems that whenever I see anyone discuss resumes, they advise doing it
      this way. I have nver seen it done this way in the theatrical world,
      although I admit I haven't seen anyone's costume design resume recently.
      I still make my resumes consisting of a list of jobs held in chronoogical
      order. I only state the play designed or draped or whatever, the location,
      sometimes the director, and sometimes the date. I never add any
      descriptions because I thinbk that everyone who works in the theatre
      understands what the designers do and that would be unneccessary.

      So now that I am actively pursuing design jobs again, I'm wondering if
      this is still true for theatrical resumes. What are your opinions out
      there?

      Sylrog




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    • sylvia@ntw.net
      ... Isn t it obvious what one has done if one puts down what shows she s designed? Everyone in theatre knows what it means to be a designer.
      Message 2 of 12 , Mar 1 9:24 PM
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        >
        >
        > When I look at resumes I want to know exactly what a person can do and
        > what it looks like when they're done. I'm less concerned with exactly
        > which shows they've done or where/when they went to school.

        Isn't it obvious what one has done if one puts down what shows she's
        designed? Everyone in theatre knows what it means to be a designer.
        >
        > References are extremely important. I never interview anyone for whom I
        > can't get at least two positive verbal references in advance.
        >
        > Kate Murphy
        >
        >
      • lanorte1@aol.com
        In a message dated 3/1/2004 11:27:32 PM Central Standard Time, sylvia@ntw.net ... While I generally value references, I ve learned to be somewhat skeptical of
        Message 3 of 12 , Mar 1 9:32 PM
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          In a message dated 3/1/2004 11:27:32 PM Central Standard Time, sylvia@...
          writes:
          > References are extremely important. I never interview anyone for whom I
          > can't get at least two positive verbal references in advance.
          >
          > Kate Murphy
          While I generally value references, I've learned to be somewhat skeptical of
          them - after all, who's going to list a reference who will say, "Yeah, she
          worked for me, and she was incompetent!" I was badly burned once hiring a
          director - resume looked good, I called two of her references, who spoke in glowing
          terms, etc. She turned out to be the Hindenburg of new hires. If she were
          only an imbecile, that would have been an improvement.

          I guess my point is, make sure you can trust the referance to be more loyal
          to you than to the prospective employee. It's the same as the theory of blind
          dates - be sure the person setting you up is closer to you than to the
          prospective date, so they'll put your best interests first.


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • amyjohnsonprf
          I usually hire for costume assistants and interns, so I need a fairely rounded skill level. But when looking for something specific like a draper and designer,
          Message 4 of 12 , Mar 2 5:59 AM
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            I usually hire for costume assistants and interns, so I need a
            fairely rounded skill level. But when looking for something specific
            like a draper and designer, then tailoring your resume is a great
            thing, but don't forget to list the extra skills somewhere.

            And about the graduation thing: I can understand why you would not
            wish to do it. We all have our reasons. My biggest complaint is the
            young ones. They have recently graduated, but they don't list it.
            Their work doesn't make sense on a time line. And I could go on. I
            guess it's just a pet peeve of mine. And I'll ask someone anyways
            when I talk to them.

            Another tip on resume's: Make sure it makes sense. Look at dates and
            times. I usually like to know what you are doing now, i.e.. listing
            things from present to past.

            AJ
            --- In TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com, Sylvia <sylvia@n...>
            wrote:
            > About the graduation date thing: I don't like to put that down on
            resumes
            > for the opposite reason. I'm no spring chicken and am afraid it
            will work
            > to my disadvantage. I know people aren't supposed to discriminate
            because
            > of age, but I'm sure they do it all the time if they can get away
            with it
            > and it's easy to toss a resume when you find one from someone who
            is as
            > ancient as I am! ;-)
            >
            > When you mentions skills, however, I am curious exactly what you
            mean.
            > Perhaps it applies specifically to the jobs you are hiring for.
            Since I
            > usually am only applying for a specific job such as draper or
            designer, I
            > usually tailor my resumes to that particular job so I don't feel I
            need to
            > include skills. What kind of jobs are you hiring for?
            >
            > Sylrog
            >
            > From: "amyjohnsonprf" <amyjohnson@p...>
            > Reply-To: TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com
            > Date: Mon, 01 Mar 2004 16:06:22 -0000
            > To: TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com
            > Subject: [TheCostumersManifesto] Re: Resumes
            >
            >
            > Hi Sylvia!
            >
            >
            > As someone who hires in the theatre world on a regular basis,
            what
            > i look for is almost a table format. I like to see what the person
            > can do, where they learned the skill, and WHEN they learned the
            > skill. I also like to see education, and the biggest thing i've
            > noticed is that this is no graduation date. Alot of people that
            apply
            > to my theatre are usually young, and have just graduated. I like to
            > know when, and they don't put it on their resume. I remember
            > somewhere, hearing that you never put on things that will give you
            an
            > age. But with my work, you have to be able to keep up... so i need
            to
            > know.
            >
            > You could also check some of the big job sites online to see what
            > they suggest.. like monster.com.
            >
            > AJ
            >
            >
            >
            > --- In TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com, sylvia@n... wrote:
            > > I am addicted to watching Starting Over. Probably most of you
            are
            > too
            > > busy to see this show, since it plays on weekday mornings, but
            > since I am
            > > only partially employed these days (still pursuing costume design
            > jobs), I
            > > plan my morning coffee for between 10 and 11 AM.
            > >
            > > This show, in case you don't know about it, follows the lives of
            6
            > women
            > > who come together to live for several weeks in the same house in
            > Chicago,
            > > with the purpose of making major life changes. At the end of
            their
            > > sojourn there, they graduate and leave and their place is taken
            by
            > another
            > > new woman. It has become a soap opera for me and is replacing
            All
            > My
            > > Children, which I have long considered my one vice.
            > >
            > > Anyhow, my question for you concerns the goal of one woman in the
            > house to
            > > move out of the projects and become self-sufficient. To that end
            > she is
            > > getting coaching on job hunting skills, which brings up for me
            the
            > resume
            > > format question again. She has been advised to create skills-
            based
            > > resumes with descriptions of what she has accomplished on
            previous
            > jobs.
            > > It seems that whenever I see anyone discuss resumes, they advise
            > doing it
            > > this way. I have nver seen it done this way in the theatrical
            > world,
            > > although I admit I haven't seen anyone's costume design resume
            > recently.
            > > I still make my resumes consisting of a list of jobs held in
            > chronoogical
            > > order. I only state the play designed or draped or whatever, the
            > location,
            > > sometimes the director, and sometimes the date. I never add any
            > > descriptions because I thinbk that everyone who works in the
            theatre
            > > understands what the designers do and that would be unneccessary.
            > >
            > > So now that I am actively pursuing design jobs again, I'm
            wondering
            > if
            > > this is still true for theatrical resumes. What are your
            opinions
            > out
            > > there?
            > >
            > > Sylrog
            >
            >
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          • K Murphy
            Actually, it s not obvious at all. Some people call themselves designers but what they really do is go around borrowing/renting costumes from other theaters
            Message 5 of 12 , Mar 2 7:12 AM
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              Actually, it's not obvious at all. Some people call themselves designers but what they really do is go around borrowing/renting costumes from other theaters or rental houses. Some of them rely for "research" on what they've seen in the movies or on other theater's stages. Some of them can't draw. Some of them think they know what they're doing but their work (or the work they're supervising) is awful -- puckered seams, ill-fitting alterations, colors from several different palettes, etc.

              And not everyone knows what you, in particular, can do for them, even though they may have a good idea of what theater designers do in general. If you don't want to list your particular skills, that's fine, but in my opinion, it's helpful to the people who may be evaluating you based purely on a piece of paper. Your resume is about you, not about costume design "in general."

              Kate Murphy

              sylvia@... wrote:


              Isn't it obvious what one has done if one puts down what shows she's
              designed? Everyone in theatre knows what it means to be a designer.



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            • sylvia@ntw.net
              I hdan t looked at it that way, maybe because I can do it all and have done so many times and figured all other designers did so as well. That makes me look
              Message 6 of 12 , Mar 2 3:13 PM
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                I hdan't looked at it that way, maybe because I can do it all and have
                done so many times and figured all other designers did so as well. That
                makes me look at my own skills and talents more positively and I will
                remember to enumerate them when redrafting my resume. Thanx!

                Sylrog

                > Actually, it's not obvious at all. Some people call themselves designers
                > but what they really do is go around borrowing/renting costumes from other
                > theaters or rental houses. Some of them rely for "research" on what
                > they've seen in the movies or on other theater's stages. Some of them
                > can't draw. Some of them think they know what they're doing but their work
                > (or the work they're supervising) is awful -- puckered seams, ill-fitting
                > alterations, colors from several different palettes, etc.
                >
                > And not everyone knows what you, in particular, can do for them, even
                > though they may have a good idea of what theater designers do in general.
                > If you don't want to list your particular skills, that's fine, but in my
                > opinion, it's helpful to the people who may be evaluating you based purely
                > on a piece of paper. Your resume is about you, not about costume design
                > "in general."
                >
                > Kate Murphy
                >
                > sylvia@... wrote:
                >
                >
                > Isn't it obvious what one has done if one puts down what shows she's
                > designed? Everyone in theatre knows what it means to be a designer.
                >
                >
                >
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              • David
                After being burnt one too many times, I now ask to see a portfolio as a follow up to the resume, and cross reference the two very carefully. I have been stuck
                Message 7 of 12 , Mar 3 5:42 AM
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                  After being burnt one too many times, I now ask to see a portfolio as
                  a follow up to the resume, and cross reference the two very carefully.
                  I have been stuck with people who "do it all", and it was only after
                  employing them that I realized that they meant "do it all ... badly".
                  What is that old expression? A jack of all trades, a master of none?
                • sylvia@ntw.net
                  ... over 25 years, as I have, one often has learned and done it all. I certainly wouldn t use that expression on a resume, but I am or have been a great
                  Message 8 of 12 , Mar 3 7:43 AM
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                    > I didn't mean to sound conceited but when you've been in the busines for
                    over 25 years, as I have, one often has learned and done it all. I
                    certainly wouldn't use that expression on a resume, but I am or have
                    been a great designer and illustrator, a very good draper, an excellent
                    stitcher, a painter/dyer, and a teacher. About the only thing I can't
                    do well in costuming in the crafts end of the job, and I would love to
                    learn more of that.

                    Sylrog
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > After being burnt one too many times, I now ask to see a portfolio as
                    > a follow up to the resume, and cross reference the two very carefully.
                    > I have been stuck with people who "do it all", and it was only
                    > after
                    > employing them that I realized that they meant "do it all ...
                    > badly".
                    > What is that old expression? A jack of all trades, a master of none?
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Yahoo! Groups Links
                    >
                    > To visit your group on the web, go
                    > to:http://groups.yahoo.com/group/TheCostumersManifesto/
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                  • David
                    I too have been doing this professionally for nearly 25 years, and I am happy to report that I neither know, or have learned, it all. You didn t sound
                    Message 9 of 12 , Mar 3 7:55 AM
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                      I too have been doing this professionally for nearly 25 years, and I
                      am happy to report that I neither know, or have learned, it all. You
                      didn't sound conceited. It is just a phrase which I have I heard far
                      too often, from those who have no right to use it. If, in fact, you
                      have done it all, I congratulate and admire you.
                      --- In TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com, sylvia@n... wrote:
                      > > I didn't mean to sound conceited but when you've been in the
                      busines for
                      > over 25 years, as I have, one often has learned and done it all. I
                      > certainly wouldn't use that expression on a resume, but I am or have
                      > been a great designer and illustrator, a very good draper, an excellent
                      > stitcher, a painter/dyer, and a teacher. About the only thing I can't
                      > do well in costuming in the crafts end of the job, and I would love to
                      > learn more of that.
                      >
                      > Sylrog
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > After being burnt one too many times, I now ask to see a portfolio as
                      > > a follow up to the resume, and cross reference the two very carefully.
                      > > I have been stuck with people who "do it all", and it was only
                      > > after
                      > > employing them that I realized that they meant "do it all ...
                      > > badly".
                      > > What is that old expression? A jack of all trades, a master of none?
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                      > >
                      > > To visit your group on the web, go
                      > > to:http://groups.yahoo.com/group/TheCostumersManifesto/
                      > > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email
                      > > to:TheCostumersManifesto-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                      > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.
                      > >
                      > >
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                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
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