Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Sketches

Expand Messages
  • showcostumes
    One of my things I want to accomplish this year is learning to sketch my ideas before I put them together. Right now I just have an idea in my head and my
    Message 1 of 7 , Dec 31, 2003
    • 0 Attachment
      One of my "things I want to accomplish this year" is learning to
      sketch my ideas before I put them together. Right now I just have an
      idea in my head and my costumes come together as I sew. I want to be
      able to convey my ideas to directors I am working with.

      I have very little drawing skill. I usually trace a figure from a
      sillohutte (sp) I found in a competition costume book and use colored
      pencils to try and convey my vision of what the costume will look
      like. I have no formal education, as far as costume design goes and
      I know there are classes to teach just this thing, however, not near
      me or not available during the middle of the night when most of my
      free time is!!!

      Can anyone suggest a good book or resource I can use to teach myself?

      Thanks and Happy New Year to everyone!
    • K Murphy
      I learned to draw by reading Jack Hamm s, How to Draw the Head and Figure thirty years ago...and it s still in print, that s how good this book is! He
      Message 2 of 7 , Dec 31, 2003
      • 0 Attachment
        I learned to draw by reading Jack Hamm's, "How to Draw the Head and Figure" thirty years ago...and it's still in print, that's how good this book is! He starts with simple geometric shapes in proportion and shows you, step by step, how to add details. This is a basic, basic book, and it won't intimidate you or assume you know things you don't know. (Other popular books, like "Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain," and "How to Draw What You See" are also good, but for my tastes, not for someone just starting out.

        There are some courses you can order to take at home or take online and some free stuff out there, too (see www.Fashion-era.com (for period fashion designs) and www.dangheno.net (drawing the body from life) as just a couple examples. I don't know how effective they would be for you, though; they're just sites I've run across.

        There's also a costume text called, "A Handbook of Costume Drawing" by Georgia O'Daniel Baker that is very specific to period costume rendering.

        Just remember, nobody is born knowing how to draw! My brother, who is a very successful architect in Boston, couldn't draw anything but a stick figure until he was 21 and studied rendering in college...and guess what? Now he's the "Go To" guy when his firm needs sketches or watercolors to "sell" a project!

        Good luck and have fun.

        Kate Murphy

        showcostumes <showcostumes@...> wrote:
        One of my "things I want to accomplish this year" is learning to
        sketch my ideas before I put them together. Right now I just have an
        idea in my head and my costumes come together as I sew. I want to be
        able to convey my ideas to directors I am working with.

        I have very little drawing skill. I usually trace a figure from a
        sillohutte (sp) I found in a competition costume book and use colored
        pencils to try and convey my vision of what the costume will look
        like. I have no formal education, as far as costume design goes and
        I know there are classes to teach just this thing, however, not near
        me or not available during the middle of the night when most of my
        free time is!!!

        Can anyone suggest a good book or resource I can use to teach myself?

        Thanks and Happy New Year to everyone!




        ---------------------------------
        Yahoo! Groups Links

        To visit your group on the web, go to:
        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/TheCostumersManifesto/

        To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
        TheCostumersManifesto-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

        Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.



        ---------------------------------
        Do you Yahoo!?
        Find out what made the Top Yahoo! Searches of 2003

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Maurine Starkey
        If you are going the self help route, these books might help you. Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain Betty Edwards The Hidden Elements of Drawing Joseph
        Message 3 of 7 , Dec 31, 2003
        • 0 Attachment
          If you are going the self help route, these books might help you.

          Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain
          Betty Edwards

          The Hidden Elements of Drawing
          Joseph Mugnaini

          Both of these books have been used in college courses. Being familiar with them
          will be an asset if you find a �life� drawing class. There are online courses
          and some are very good. They will let you work at your pace. You need a scanner
          to do this though.

          I�m sure there are some folks in the group who are more familiar with �fashion�
          drawing. They can give you direction toward more specific industry methods and
          books. I have a few old Walter Foster �How To� book. But the best fashion book
          I ever got was a Japanese softbound book �Fashion Illustrations�Ladies, Men &
          Children�. It was published in the late 80�s and is a good resource. I�m not
          sure libraries carry this book.

          I�ve been an art instructor for many years. Of course I will be the first
          person who will insist you take a �live� class. Self-help from books only goes
          so far. I�m not pooh poohing the efforts of those who choose to learn only from
          books. I do believe they are missing out on a valuable resource. There is a
          scene from the movie Remo Williams when Joel Grey goes to put on his glasses�

          Remo: �You told me you could see?�
          Joel Grey: �I can see. I put on my glasses to see MORE.�

          Basic classes in art are essential building blocks. If there is a community
          college in your area, check out their art department. Go to student shows.
          There are open houses where you can talk to an instructor. Do some research on
          the classes and see what would be good for you. Drawing is a fundamental skill
          every artist in every field needs to know and practice. You don�t have to be
          good. Drawing skills are what you use to get the idea down on paper and make a
          plan. Edith Head�s rendering skills weren�t all that great. But she got the
          idea down to sell her vision for the movies she did. Her drawing sold the
          directors, and executives. Her final work sold the audience. She knew the
          importance of �concept drawings�. Anyway, before I go off on another tangent.
          This is the whole reason for this email.

          Check out basic drawing books from the library (My favorite, and free! Thank
          you Ben Franklin).
          Check out local community colleges. There are art groups in most towns. Check
          them out to see if they are what you need. Parks and Recreation will offer
          adult classes. On the rare occasion there are professional illustrators who
          give classes. I went that route and it made a big difference in my work.

          Carry a sketchbook with you all the time. Doodle, draw the people at the bus
          stop. Draw the telephone booth. What has that got to do with fashion? Well,
          it's real life and its good for your brain.
          Maurine Starkey


          =====
          Getting More...SiliCon 2004
          www.siliconventions.com









          __________________________________
          Do you Yahoo!?
          Find out what made the Top Yahoo! Searches of 2003
          http://search.yahoo.com/top2003
        • surggj
          here ...here .......totally agree.......and while you are at it......I found that taking tracing paper and catalogs of fashion and coloring books and books, a
          Message 4 of 7 , Dec 31, 2003
          • 0 Attachment
            here ...here .......totally agree.......and while you are at it......I found that taking tracing paper and catalogs of fashion and coloring books and books, a nice way to get use to doing bodies.........trace til you can set down and then do it on your own.....I am no where a great artist but if you can get the job by getting the point across then you have succeeded. One can become a professional without school or class, if they are getting paid for it......but classes make you a better sketcher and soon drawing becomes something like a hobby.......I have sketched my own foot while waiting on a doctor appointment......find beauty in everything , even the stupid things and just think.....maybe those art classes will teach you that you want to know more about art, art history and famous artist that were designers.........:)

            Maurine Starkey <colmahouse@...> wrote:


            If you are going the self help route, these books might help you.

            Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain
            Betty Edwards

            The Hidden Elements of Drawing
            Joseph Mugnaini

            Both of these books have been used in college courses. Being familiar with them
            will be an asset if you find a �life� drawing class. There are online courses
            and some are very good. They will let you work at your pace. You need a scanner
            to do this though.

            I�m sure there are some folks in the group who are more familiar with �fashion�
            drawing. They can give you direction toward more specific industry methods and
            books. I have a few old Walter Foster �How To� book. But the best fashion book
            I ever got was a Japanese softbound book �Fashion Illustrations�Ladies, Men &
            Children�. It was published in the late 80�s and is a good resource. I�m not
            sure libraries carry this book.

            I�ve been an art instructor for many years. Of course I will be the first
            person who will insist you take a �live� class. Self-help from books only goes
            so far. I�m not pooh poohing the efforts of those who choose to learn only from
            books. I do believe they are missing out on a valuable resource. There is a
            scene from the movie Remo Williams when Joel Grey goes to put on his glasses�

            Remo: �You told me you could see?�
            Joel Grey: �I can see. I put on my glasses to see MORE.�

            Basic classes in art are essential building blocks. If there is a community
            college in your area, check out their art department. Go to student shows.
            There are open houses where you can talk to an instructor. Do some research on
            the classes and see what would be good for you. Drawing is a fundamental skill
            every artist in every field needs to know and practice. You don�t have to be
            good. Drawing skills are what you use to get the idea down on paper and make a
            plan. Edith Head�s rendering skills weren�t all that great. But she got the
            idea down to sell her vision for the movies she did. Her drawing sold the
            directors, and executives. Her final work sold the audience. She knew the
            importance of �concept drawings�. Anyway, before I go off on another tangent.
            This is the whole reason for this email.

            Check out basic drawing books from the library (My favorite, and free! Thank
            you Ben Franklin).
            Check out local community colleges. There are art groups in most towns. Check
            them out to see if they are what you need. Parks and Recreation will offer
            adult classes. On the rare occasion there are professional illustrators who
            give classes. I went that route and it made a big difference in my work.

            Carry a sketchbook with you all the time. Doodle, draw the people at the bus
            stop. Draw the telephone booth. What has that got to do with fashion? Well,
            it's real life and its good for your brain.
            Maurine Starkey


            =====
            Getting More...SiliCon 2004
            www.siliconventions.com









            __________________________________
            Do you Yahoo!?
            Find out what made the Top Yahoo! Searches of 2003
            http://search.yahoo.com/top2003



            Yahoo! Groups Links

            To visit your group on the web, go to:
            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/TheCostumersManifesto/

            To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
            TheCostumersManifesto-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

            Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to:
            http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/




            It is a heart inside which speaks volumes in an outside, silent shell........Glenda Sabo 2001

            ---------------------------------
            Do you Yahoo!?
            Find out what made the Top Yahoo! Searches of 2003

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Maurine Starkey
            While you are at it. A good class on color theory would be the bomb. The art director on Disney s Beauty and the Beast once gave a talk on using color to
            Message 5 of 7 , Dec 31, 2003
            • 0 Attachment
              While you are at it. A good class on color theory would be the bomb.
              The art director on Disney's Beauty and the Beast once gave a talk on using
              color to define a character. Bele's costume is blue at the beginning of the
              movie. It shows her as intellectual and separate from the villagers. She
              doesn�t fit in. As the movie progresses her clothing becomes warmer. She starts
              to open up. Then we get to the grand ballroom and her shining gold dress. Just
              the opposite for the Beast's colors. He starts of in animal colors and as he
              becomes more civilized his clothing becomes brighter and more pure. Physiology
              in color for story telling is critical. Just where would a bad guy be if he
              wore a Lavender hat? It would be funny, but not scary. A true villain is
              dressed on the dark side of the color wheel.

              One other point about color in story telling. We are familiar with the almost
              clich� picture of two opponents playing a game of chess. One side is white,
              (therefore good) and the other side is black (therefore evil). In the first
              X-men, Xavier and Magnus are playing chess with glass pieces. All game pieces
              were essentially white. The frosted pieces belonging to Xavier reflected his
              constant struggle for free will, the right of others and enlightenment. Magnus�
              pieces were clear. His vision has the clarity of the madman. It is going to be
              his way, his answer and no one has a choice. I thought it was an excellent
              defining of their characters.

              As an illustrator, I have to show a person�s personality in the clothes he/she
              wears and the choices in little details they choose to hang on themselves.

              Maurine Starkey

              -

              =====
              Getting More...SiliCon 2004
              www.siliconventions.com









              __________________________________
              Do you Yahoo!?
              Find out what made the Top Yahoo! Searches of 2003
              http://search.yahoo.com/top2003
            • randy keator
              ... From: showcostumes To: Sent: Wednesday, December 31, 2003 8:14 AM Subject:
              Message 6 of 7 , Jan 1, 2004
              • 0 Attachment
                ----- Original Message -----
                From: "showcostumes" <showcostumes@...>
                To: <TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Wednesday, December 31, 2003 8:14 AM
                Subject: [TheCostumersManifesto] Sketches


                > One of my "things I want to accomplish this year" is learning to
                > sketch my ideas before I put them together. Right now I just have an
                > idea in my head and my costumes come together as I sew. I want to be
                > able to convey my ideas to directors I am working with.
                >
                > I have very little drawing skill. I usually trace a figure from a
                > sillohutte (sp) I found in a competition costume book and use colored
                > pencils to try and convey my vision of what the costume will look
                > like. I have no formal education, as far as costume design goes and
                > I know there are classes to teach just this thing, however, not near
                > me or not available during the middle of the night when most of my
                > free time is!!!
                >
                > Can anyone suggest a good book or resource I can use to teach myself?
                >
                > Thanks and Happy New Year to everyone!
                >
                > Hi there ! One of the best resources is your local library strange as that
                may sound and/or the local (nearest ) college preferably a state college
                bcuz most of the state schools allow the residents of the community to use
                the vast library and you can find all kinds of help with the art part of
                design( for your sketches) and loads of reference materials for period and
                theater designs as well as in many schools access to students who are more
                than happy to help you along the path you desire. Most of the local
                libraries now have DIY sections loaded with materials to help you teach
                yourself any number of subjects. Hope some of this helps. .Happy New Year
                !!!
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >

                ---
                [This E-mail scanned for viruses by Information Boulevard's Virus Scanning]
              • neimhaille
                ... colored ... I may be coming at this froma different angle to you as I find little difficulty in the sketching aspect. But that does come froma lifetime of
                Message 7 of 7 , Jan 1, 2004
                • 0 Attachment
                  > I have very little drawing skill. I usually trace a figure from a
                  > sillohutte (sp) I found in a competition costume book and use
                  colored
                  > pencils to try and convey my vision of what the costume will look
                  > like.

                  I may be coming at this froma different angle to you as I find little
                  difficulty in the sketching aspect. But that does come froma
                  lifetime of sketching every spare moment I had;); during lectures on
                  cellular and molecular biology, on the bus.. though that tended
                  towards the sqiggly side of things;)

                  But I also feel that you need to go the way that works for you.
                  SOmepeople benefit from classes/school but some don't. It also
                  depends on the classes;) I've had a mix of teachers for singing and
                  other theatre arts and some worked, some didn't.

                  And some things I've felt much better just trying to figure it out on
                  my own.

                  So get as many books on drawing the figure as you can. Even cartoon
                  books as they will usually show the way to distort a "normal" figure
                  to various proportions.

                  Also look at a variety of designer's work as you may find some sketch
                  in very frugal ways, using colour in blocks and swatches of fabric to
                  convey the design.

                  Oh it can also be fun to look at sketches by the Great Masters as an
                  example of how the ideal figure has changes over the years, just to
                  give an idea of how the lithe figures you will probably need to draw
                  are only a temporary ideal.

                  I'm pretty sure Worth couldn't draw the female figure, so he drew his
                  designs over a prepared figure.

                  michaela
                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.