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Re: [TheCostumersManifesto] Digest Number 161

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  • Jeanine Eastham
    on 09/02/2001 1:11 AM, TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com at ... Thanks for the tips on the Australian Outback! I ll be looking into them. Much obliged,
    Message 1 of 1 , Sep 2, 2001
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      on 09/02/2001 1:11 AM, TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com at
      TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com wrote:

      >
      > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
      > TheCostumersManifesto-unsubscribe@egroups.com
      >
      >
      > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      >
      > There are 5 messages in this issue.
      >
      > Topics in this digest:
      >
      > 1. Re: Hi, new here
      > From: "Lee & Susan" <lecachot@...>
      > 2. Australian Outback, 1900
      > From: Jeanine Eastham <lambetheast@...>
      > 3. Re: Hi, new here
      > From: "Kaya K." <Merit_Aten@...>
      > 4. Re: Hi, new here
      > From: "Lee & Susan" <lecachot@...>
      > 5. Re: Australian Outback, 1900
      > From: "Catherine Currie" <duchess_of_erat@...>
      >
      >
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      >
      > Message: 1
      > Date: Sat, 1 Sep 2001 09:18:33 -0500
      > From: "Lee & Susan" <lecachot@...>
      > Subject: Re: Hi, new here
      >
      > Ancient Egypt is also a great love of mine (along with modern Egypt!) :)
      > Anyway, I can recomment one good book for some information on Egyptian
      > Amulets; it's called (interestingly enough) Amulets of Ancient Egypt by
      > Carol Andrews, published by the University of Texas Press in 1994 (ISBN
      > 0-292-70464-X) It has some very good pictures, both colour and b&w, of
      > amulets and jewellery. For upper class, gold was the metal, silver was
      > actually very rare (TutAnkhAmun's tomb contained a total of 2! silver
      > objects). The Egyptians did not use what we would consider precious stones;
      > carnelian was used a lot, lapis lazuli and turquoise were not uncommon,
      > amethyst and garnet were also used. These are the ones that spring
      > immediately to mind. Also, a lot of items were made of faience, which is a
      > man-made, glass paste. A lot of ancient Egyptians jewellery tends to look
      > somewhat gaudy to modern eyes, since they used colour combinations we
      > probably wouldn't; but I'm with you, I love the jewellery of Egypt. I'll
      > dig through my collection, and see what other books I can find, I think
      > there are some other books around specifically on jewellery.
      > Hope this helped some,
      > Susan
      >
      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: Merit_Aten@... <Merit_Aten@...>
      > To: TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com
      > <TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com>
      > Date: Friday, August 31, 2001 9:12 PM
      > Subject: [TheCostumersManifesto] Hi, new here
      >
      >
      >> Hi everyone,
      >>
      >> Surely I will get some good advice here. I'm an archaeology student
      >> and love Ancient Egypt enough to be working toward a career which may
      >> never repay the cost I have invested in it. I love the style of
      >> jewelry the Egyptians wore, and have tried to make jewelry for myself
      >> based on the style they used. The problem is, as a beginner, it seems
      >> so complicated. I know what stones they used and what they mean. I'd
      >> like to be able to make my own jewelry because the cost of ready-made
      >> is too much. Even the cost of buying beads is discouraging. Any
      >> advice will be so helpful!
      >> Thanks,
      >> K.
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      >
      > Message: 2
      > Date: Sat, 01 Sep 2001 10:17:27 -0700
      > From: Jeanine Eastham <lambetheast@...>
      > Subject: Australian Outback, 1900
      >
      > Hello, I've been reading along for some time but haven't written in before.
      > Am looking for resources for the Australian Outback, 1900. Specifically
      > workmen, coachmen, etc. Any ideas? Thanks, J.L.
      >
      >
      >
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      >
      > Message: 3
      > Date: Sat, 01 Sep 2001 20:34:34 -0500
      > From: "Kaya K." <Merit_Aten@...>
      > Subject: Re: Hi, new here
      >
      > Thanks for the tip, I have so many "scholarly" books on Egypt with few color
      > photos. Personally I prefer stones like lapis and turquoise, and don't
      > really care for diamonds and other "see through" stones. School starts next
      > week, so jewelry making time for me will be scattered between study and
      > work, but hopefully things will turn out. It's the closest I can get to
      > Egypt until graduate studies. Thanks again for your suggestion, and I will
      > look for the book. (figuring out how to make what I see is the biggest
      > challenge)
      >
      > K.
      >
      >
      >> From: "Lee & Susan" <lecachot@...>
      >> Reply-To: TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com
      >> To: <TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com>
      >> Subject: Re: [TheCostumersManifesto] Hi, new here
      >> Date: Sat, 1 Sep 2001 09:18:33 -0500
      >>
      >> Ancient Egypt is also a great love of mine (along with modern Egypt!) :)
      >> Anyway, I can recomment one good book for some information on Egyptian
      >> Amulets; it's called (interestingly enough) Amulets of Ancient Egypt by
      >> Carol Andrews, published by the University of Texas Press in 1994 (ISBN
      >> 0-292-70464-X) It has some very good pictures, both colour and b&w, of
      >> amulets and jewellery. For upper class, gold was the metal, silver was
      >> actually very rare (TutAnkhAmun's tomb contained a total of 2! silver
      >> objects). The Egyptians did not use what we would consider precious
      >> stones;
      >> carnelian was used a lot, lapis lazuli and turquoise were not uncommon,
      >> amethyst and garnet were also used. These are the ones that spring
      >> immediately to mind. Also, a lot of items were made of faience, which is a
      >> man-made, glass paste. A lot of ancient Egyptians jewellery tends to look
      >> somewhat gaudy to modern eyes, since they used colour combinations we
      >> probably wouldn't; but I'm with you, I love the jewellery of Egypt. I'll
      >> dig through my collection, and see what other books I can find, I think
      >> there are some other books around specifically on jewellery.
      >> Hope this helped some,
      >> Susan
      >>
      >> -----Original Message-----
      >> From: Merit_Aten@... <Merit_Aten@...>
      >> To: TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com
      >> <TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com>
      >> Date: Friday, August 31, 2001 9:12 PM
      >> Subject: [TheCostumersManifesto] Hi, new here
      >>
      >>
      >>> Hi everyone,
      >>>
      >>> Surely I will get some good advice here. I'm an archaeology student
      >>> and love Ancient Egypt enough to be working toward a career which may
      >>> never repay the cost I have invested in it. I love the style of
      >>> jewelry the Egyptians wore, and have tried to make jewelry for myself
      >>> based on the style they used. The problem is, as a beginner, it seems
      >>> so complicated. I know what stones they used and what they mean. I'd
      >>> like to be able to make my own jewelry because the cost of ready-made
      >>> is too much. Even the cost of buying beads is discouraging. Any
      >>> advice will be so helpful!
      >>> Thanks,
      >>> K.
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
      >> TheCostumersManifesto-unsubscribe@egroups.com
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
      >>
      >>
      >
      >
      > _________________________________________________________________
      > Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at http://explorer.msn.com/intl.asp
      >
      >
      >
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      >
      > Message: 4
      > Date: Sat, 1 Sep 2001 21:41:37 -0500
      > From: "Lee & Susan" <lecachot@...>
      > Subject: Re: Hi, new here
      >
      > I was paging through the book again, and I re-discovered that the last
      > chapter is entitled "Materials and Their Symbolism," which seems to tie in
      > with another part of your question. By the bye, are you studying Egyptology
      > or Archaeology, and where? (Just my curiosity running rampant here). I was
      > an Archaeology major at the University of Texas - Austin for about 1 year,
      > until I discovered I really don't like the way a lot of American
      > archaeologists think (but that is another story:) )
      > Susan
      >
      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: Kaya K. <Merit_Aten@...>
      > To: TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com
      > <TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com>
      > Date: Saturday, September 01, 2001 8:33 PM
      > Subject: Re: [TheCostumersManifesto] Hi, new here
      >
      >
      >> Thanks for the tip, I have so many "scholarly" books on Egypt with few
      > color
      >> photos. Personally I prefer stones like lapis and turquoise, and don't
      >> really care for diamonds and other "see through" stones. School starts next
      >> week, so jewelry making time for me will be scattered between study and
      >> work, but hopefully things will turn out. It's the closest I can get to
      >> Egypt until graduate studies. Thanks again for your suggestion, and I will
      >> look for the book. (figuring out how to make what I see is the biggest
      >> challenge)
      >>
      >> K.
      >>
      >>
      >>> From: "Lee & Susan" <lecachot@...>
      >>> Reply-To: TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com
      >>> To: <TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com>
      >>> Subject: Re: [TheCostumersManifesto] Hi, new here
      >>> Date: Sat, 1 Sep 2001 09:18:33 -0500
      >>>
      >>> Ancient Egypt is also a great love of mine (along with modern Egypt!) :)
      >>> Anyway, I can recomment one good book for some information on Egyptian
      >>> Amulets; it's called (interestingly enough) Amulets of Ancient Egypt by
      >>> Carol Andrews, published by the University of Texas Press in 1994 (ISBN
      >>> 0-292-70464-X) It has some very good pictures, both colour and b&w, of
      >>> amulets and jewellery. For upper class, gold was the metal, silver was
      >>> actually very rare (TutAnkhAmun's tomb contained a total of 2! silver
      >>> objects). The Egyptians did not use what we would consider precious
      >>> stones;
      >>> carnelian was used a lot, lapis lazuli and turquoise were not uncommon,
      >>> amethyst and garnet were also used. These are the ones that spring
      >>> immediately to mind. Also, a lot of items were made of faience, which is
      > a
      >>> man-made, glass paste. A lot of ancient Egyptians jewellery tends to look
      >>> somewhat gaudy to modern eyes, since they used colour combinations we
      >>> probably wouldn't; but I'm with you, I love the jewellery of Egypt. I'll
      >>> dig through my collection, and see what other books I can find, I think
      >>> there are some other books around specifically on jewellery.
      >>> Hope this helped some,
      >>> Susan
      >>>
      >>> -----Original Message-----
      >>> From: Merit_Aten@... <Merit_Aten@...>
      >>> To: TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com
      >>> <TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com>
      >>> Date: Friday, August 31, 2001 9:12 PM
      >>> Subject: [TheCostumersManifesto] Hi, new here
      >>>
      >>>
      >>>> Hi everyone,
      >>>>
      >>>> Surely I will get some good advice here. I'm an archaeology student
      >>>> and love Ancient Egypt enough to be working toward a career which may
      >>>> never repay the cost I have invested in it. I love the style of
      >>>> jewelry the Egyptians wore, and have tried to make jewelry for myself
      >>>> based on the style they used. The problem is, as a beginner, it seems
      >>>> so complicated. I know what stones they used and what they mean. I'd
      >>>> like to be able to make my own jewelry because the cost of ready-made
      >>>> is too much. Even the cost of buying beads is discouraging. Any
      >>>> advice will be so helpful!
      >>>> Thanks,
      >>>> K.
      >>>
      >>>
      >>>
      >>>
      >>> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
      >>> TheCostumersManifesto-unsubscribe@egroups.com
      >>>
      >>>
      >>>
      >>> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
      >>>
      >>>
      >>
      >>
      >> _________________________________________________________________
      >> Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at http://explorer.msn.com/intl.asp
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
      >> TheCostumersManifesto-unsubscribe@egroups.com
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
      >>
      >>
      >
      >
      >
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      >
      > Message: 5
      > Date: Sun, 02 Sep 2001 17:25:42 +1000
      > From: "Catherine Currie" <duchess_of_erat@...>
      > Subject: Re: Australian Outback, 1900
      >
      >
      >
      > [This message is not in displayable format]
      >
      >
      >
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      >
      >
      >
      > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
      >
      >
      Thanks for the tips on the Australian Outback! I'll be looking into them.
      Much obliged, J.L.
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