Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: need research help

Expand Messages
  • Dina
    I would check with the American Textile History Museum ATHM.org This article has several names for irons that might be more useful search terms: Goosing iron,
    Message 1 of 5 , Aug 14, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
      I would check with the American Textile History Museum ATHM.org

      This article has several names for irons that might be more useful search terms: Goosing iron, sad iron, soapstone smoothing iron, charcoal iron or chimney iron
      http://www.oldandinteresting.com/antique-irons-smoothers-mangles.aspx

      Using these terms:
      http://www.ebay.com/itm/Late-19th-Century-Sad-Iron-with-Original-Trivet-and-wooden-handle-and-lid-/330939533370

      http://www.liveauctioneers.com/item/1814823 The auction house might give the name of the person who bought 160 !

      http://deannamoyers.ecrater.com/p/16654871/antique-cast-iron-sad-laundry

      http://collectibles.about.com/od/priceguidesonline/ig/Sad-Iron-Pictures-and-Prices/

      I know I've been to an exhibit where I was allowed to handle antique iron replicas, but it might have been at one of the english greathouses.

      Best wishes!

      Dina Flockhart
      www.cloakmaker.com

      --- In TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com, "Orphan Annie" <theatrerulz@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > Thanks Judy!
      > I'll start looking thru the sites you suggested. Sometimes one of my biggest pet-peeves in research is finding a wonderful picture of my topic of interest, but no specific date. This is the problem I've had with researching the dressforms.
      >
      > The shop I'm in isn't an original. The whole village was built about 40-45yrs as a 'representation' of a central Ohio village/town. Research has been done to justify the hows and why's of our set up. But the shop still seems pretty bare in my honest opinion. PLUS, they have a bunch of ready-made clothing hanging in the shop for men/women/children to try-on as an "activity." They call it "dress the part". This, I'm 99% sure is NOT historically accurate. Which the musuem staff does acknowledge isn't H.A., but they want visitors to have activities to do. I (and other volunteers) find it an annoyance.
      >
      > My idea is to make the dressmakers shop more H.A. and functional by combining the milliner and dressmakers shops into one side of the building. The other room can be the 'dress-up' area with the clothes and hats. Then in the shop side bring in more things to make it functional. ie. pattern pieces, dressform(s), iron(s), ironboard etc. Then when the shop is not staffed, we can gate it off from the public and still allow them access to try on the clothes.
      >
      > Of course, I'm told that I have to be able to document everything. So, this brings me back to the research needs.
      >
      > Anna
      >
      > --- In TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com, "Judy Cataldo" <judycat5@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Hi,
      > >
      > > There is a page on the history of ironing boards
      > > http://www.oldandinteresting.com/history-ironing-boards.aspx It looks
      > > like the folding ironing board was not invented until the 1860s and would
      > > likely not be in a home in 1863 since there was a war going on. There are
      > > some images online of women using boards over chairs or balanced on tables
      > >
      > > 19th century ironing board/table images:
      > > http://www.archives.gov.on.ca/en/explore/online/diaries/working-women.aspx
      > > scroll down, late 19th century; mostly tables in use on this page
      > > http://bjws.blogspot.com/2012/11/ironing-laundry-1800s.html
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Irons http://www.oldandinteresting.com/antique-irons-smoothers-mangles.aspx
      > > I know someone who does period clothing and he says there is nothing like
      > > the long iron heated on coals to press open a wool seam.
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > There seem to be multiple images of 19th century dress forms online. You
      > > may also want to check images for Victorian dressmakers. Does the museum
      > > have account books for the original store so you can see what they had?
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Judy
      > >
      > > Judycat5@
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > From: TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com
      > > [mailto:TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Orphan Annie
      > > Sent: Monday, August 12, 2013 3:12 PM
      > > To: TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com
      > > Subject: [TheCostumersManifesto] need research help
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Hello all!
      > > I need some help with research, PLEASE! This summer I've been volunteering
      > > as a historical interpreter in the Ohio Village. I interpret the village
      > > dressmaker ca. 1863. In an effort to set the village shop accurately (and
      > > functionally) I've been trying to research what would be in that shop. Some
      > > of the things that I need to find documentation on are: irons, dressforms,
      > > and ironing boards. I know irons and dressforms were used, but what types,
      > > what did they look like etc.? As for ironing boards, were they used, what
      > > did they look like? Were they covered and/or padded, like we do today?
      > >
      > > Anyone have any ideas on where/how to find this?
      > >
      > > Thanks,
      > > Anna
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      >
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.