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12th century help

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  • Alice
    In Marie de France s Lanval , handmaidens of a fairy lady are described as wearing taffeta over their bare skin more or less. My question is this: how do
    Message 1 of 3 , Apr 10 4:07 PM
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      In Marie de France's "Lanval", handmaidens of a fairy lady are described as wearing 'taffeta over their bare skin' more or less. My question is this: how do you think this appears to the viewer? Do you think it is simply that the silk is so thin that it is obvious there are no layers underneath it, or do you think that there are flashes of skin (say, at the side-lacing of a bliaut) where there ought to be fabric? Any thoughts on the matter would be much appreciated!
    • debbie_lough
      I d say a combination of the two, although not necessarily in bliaut form, as obviously the evidence for the modern idea of a bliaut is so sketchy that it may
      Message 2 of 3 , Apr 11 2:43 AM
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        I'd say a combination of the two, although not necessarily in bliaut form, as obviously the evidence for the modern idea of a bliaut is so sketchy that it may well be a modern construct of late 19th and early 20th century dress historians, as so much is.

        Debbie


        --- In TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com, "Alice" <allerophon@...> wrote:
        >
        > In Marie de France's "Lanval", handmaidens of a fairy lady are described as wearing 'taffeta over their bare skin' more or less. My question is this: how do you think this appears to the viewer? Do you think it is simply that the silk is so thin that it is obvious there are no layers underneath it, or do you think that there are flashes of skin (say, at the side-lacing of a bliaut) where there ought to be fabric? Any thoughts on the matter would be much appreciated!
        >
      • K. Marie
        I m new, I hope I may suggest an answer. The taffetta was worn in a line hugging the hip to ankle beneath a heavily gathered pale layer (lighter weight,
        Message 3 of 3 , Apr 11 5:58 PM
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          I'm new, I hope I may suggest an answer. The taffetta was worn in a line hugging the hip to ankle beneath a heavily gathered pale layer (lighter weight, non-exposing by volume of it) over this skirt. A 'better-fit' shorter skirt of taffeta below might also have a 'whipped out edge' looking bell-shaped near the midi-length. I thank my sources. Silk was sturdy in taffeta in times when thickened tightened under things were wanted; some modern clothes would still be the same as then if mounds of lighter fabric were added over as a layer. Thanks.
          Kristin
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          --- In TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com, "Alice" <allerophon@...> wrote:
          >
          > In Marie de France's "Lanval", handmaidens of a fairy lady are described as wearing 'taffeta over their bare skin' more or less. My question is this: how do you think this appears to the viewer? Do you think it is simply that the silk is so thin that it is obvious there are no layers underneath it, or do you think that there are flashes of skin (say, at the side-lacing of a bliaut) where there ought to be fabric? Any thoughts on the matter would be much appreciated!
          >
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