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Re: [TheCostumersManifesto] Learning to Sew Searching for Fabric?

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  • Sylvia Rognstad
    I don t have a problem with stretch velvet. It s the real old fashioned stuff that drives me nuts and keeps me from working with it as much as possible. 
    Message 1 of 88 , Jun 2, 2011
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      I don't have a problem with stretch velvet. It's the real old
      fashioned stuff that drives me nuts and keeps me from working with it
      as much as possible.



      Sylvia Rognstad
      Costume/clothing design & construction
      Alterations & home dec
      http://www.ezzyworld.com




      On Jun 1, 2011, at 12:16 PM, Claudia Hill wrote:

      > Sylvia,
      >
      > I take every opportunity I can of sewing with velvet of various
      > kinds. I love the colors and feel. I have been trying to quell
      > the temptation to make a shorts set with some lovely gold stretchy
      > velvet I have on hand--I can't think what I would do with it here
      > in the central Arizona desert.
      >
      > My sewing machine is a cheap Singer I bought at Walmart years ago,
      > and I don't use a walking foot
      > (though I have one; my husband uses it for sewing leather) or an
      > even feed foot. I use an ordinary zigzag foot and set the stitch
      > width to a slight zigzag.
      >
      > Here are some tips that work for me:
      >
      > 1. If you are working with stretch velvet (it doesn't creep, it
      > runs away and hides) for long straight seams, put two rows of pins
      > parallel to the edge of the fabric, one in the seam allowance and
      > one just far enough to the left of the seam line for the left side
      > of the foot to pass without snagging. Put the pins very close
      > together, the head of one pin almost touching the point of the
      > next. You can't have too many pins.
      >
      > 2. For curving seams, setting sleeves and the like, hand baste.
      > Believe me, it's worth the time.
      >
      > 3. Use a small surgical hemostat to keep the edges from curling.
      > You can get used ones dirt cheap on eBay and they have many uses in
      > sewing. I have been contemplating trying a water soluble
      > stabilizeron my next velvet project, perhaps that gold velvet
      > shorts set I'm not going to make.
      >
      > 4. Sew very, very slowly, using your fingers to guide and
      > straighten the layers of fabric, muttering to yourself, "slow and
      > steady wins the race."
      >
      > I hope these hints help. Unlike many of the members of this list,
      > I'm not a professional costumier, just love making costumes. My
      > experience too spans over half a century, sporadically. Now that
      > I'm retired, sewing and fabrics are my hobby.
      >
      > Claudia
      >
      > From: Sylvia Rognstad <sylvia@...>
      > To: TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Wednesday, June 1, 2011 7:38 AM
      > Subject: Re: [TheCostumersManifesto] Learning to Sew Searching for
      > Fabric?
      >
      >
      >
      > Do you do a lot of sewing with velvet? I would love some
      > suggestions. I have a Pfaff with an even feed foot which is great
      > for almost everything else but doesnt help with velvet and I thought
      > this foot was comparable to a walking foot, but maybe not. I have
      > pretty much given up on sewing velvet because of the difficulty.
      >
      > 
      >
      > Sylvia Rognstad
      > Costume/clothing design & construction
      > Alterations & home dec
      > http://www.ezzyworld.com
      >
      > On May 31, 2011, at 11:59 PM, Claudia Hill wrote:
      >
      > > Sylvia,
      > >
      > > There is much in what you say; velvet is more difficult than, say,
      > > broadcloth or poplin. But it isn't impossible, and given Wade's
      > > specification (a flowing fabric, to be lined with red, a cloak or
      > > robe, one that would blow actively in a breeze and yet fall back
      > > into place without tangling or rumpling, and really deeply and
      > > presumably matte black, I felt that velvet would be the best
      > > choice. However, Wade indicated that the texture of velvet was
      > > unappealing, so it's a moot point.
      > >
      > > Claudia
      > > From: Sylvia Rognstad <sylvia@...>
      > > To: TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com
      > > Sent: Tuesday, May 31, 2011 3:11 PM
      > > Subject: Re: [TheCostumersManifesto] Learning to Sew Searching for
      > > Fabric?
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > I sure wouldnt recommend learning to sew on velvet. I've been sewing
      > > for 50 years and still hate to sew that stuff. It's almost
      > > impossible to sew the seams with the correct seam allowance,
      > since it
      > > slips so badly.
      > >
      > > 
      > >
      > > Sylvia Rognstad
      > > Costume/clothing design & construction
      > > Alterations & home dec
      > > http://www.ezzyworld.com
      > >
      > > On May 31, 2011, at 11:47 AM, Claudia Hill wrote:
      > >
      > > > Wade,
      > > >
      > > > For your robe, black velvet. It's a pain to cut and sew, but
      > > > nothing flows like velvet. Be careful, though if you decide to go
      > > > with velvet. Don't buy panne' or crushed velvet nor yet velveteen
      > > > and avoid stretchy velvet. If you are independently wealthy, go
      > > > for the genuine silk velvet but if your resources are limited,
      > > > polyester will work as well for a small fraction of the price.
      > > >
      > > > Claudia
      > > >
      > > > From: Wade MacMorrighan <Wade@...>
      > > > To: TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com
      > > > Sent: Tuesday, May 31, 2011 7:49 AM
      > > > Subject: [TheCostumersManifesto] Learning to Sew Searching for
      > > Fabric?
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > Hey guys, does anyone have any advice on how I should first teach
      > > > myself the sew, as in using scraps of fabric (not that we have any
      > > > laying around, mind you!) and practice the sewing techniques that
      > > > I'll be using on my robes on any "scraps"? Oh, and I would like
      > > > anything that I sew to be as secure and as strong as possible in
      > > > terms of stitching and fabric! Any advice? If it should help in
      > > > terms of durability, back in Jr. High we were told that a certain
      > > > stitch (a zig-zag of some sort as I recall) was far more durable
      > > > than a basic straight forward stitch. Also, what sort of fabrics
      > > > ought I to be looking for? I have also heard that all fabrics
      > can't
      > > > be sewn to each other, as I've found this gorgeous cardinal-red
      > > > satin (the perfect color for the lining!) that I shall be using to
      > > > line the bell-sleeves. But, what about the rest? I want something
      > > > heavy enough, yet something that isn't too light, but something
      > > > that has a great deal of "flow" and can
      > > > billow in the breeze when worn...oh, and it'll have to be the
      > > > blackest black imaginable. ;oP Something that has some weight to
      > > > it, but it will breathe a bit and not pull and stretch under it's
      > > > own weight. You know what I mean? When I went into Joanne's
      > Fabrics
      > > > I knew exactly what I was scouting for in terms of a lining for
      > the
      > > > sleeves (and I almost didn't, because every red but the cardinal
      > > > red seemed "off"), but I haven't a clue about what I should be
      > > > looking for the the bulk of my fabric needs. Oh, and it's a shame
      > > > that I haven't found any elegantly-patterned and monochromatic
      > > > silk, either. I def. have more than a few ideas for using those
      > > > with this pattern, too!
      > > >
      > > > Hmmm....I always thought that the material that dinner napkins
      > were
      > > > made out of might be a decent fabric-type to employ, but that's
      > > > just sort of an off-the-top-of-my-head idea I'm throwing out
      > > > there... It's not as if I've ever been able to *find* any linen
      > > > that's that heavy, nor of that quality. :oP
      > > >
      > > > Take Care,
      > > > Wade
      > > >
      > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > > >
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      > > >
      > > >
      > >
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    • Wade MacMorrighan
      That was ultimately the plan, ma am! ;o) Well, something pretty darned close, any way. Heh heh heh... Jumping in here—might be easier to have black hooded
      Message 88 of 88 , Jun 4, 2011
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        That was ultimately the plan, ma'am! ;o) Well, something pretty darned close, any way. Heh heh heh...






        Jumping in here—might be easier to have black hooded cape/cloak with some kind of neutral, maybe magickal lining, and a separate different robe underneath for various rituals, featuring a significant color.
        Blessed be,
        Susan







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