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RE: [TheCostumersManifesto] Making headdresses for dance

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  • retshopbuyer@charter.net
    any clue as to size of the headdresses? and why no chin straps ? i have often used chin straps- dyed the elastic a flesh color and then dancer uses their own
    Message 1 of 11 , Mar 16 4:57 AM
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      any clue as to size of the headdresses?

      and why no chin straps ?
      i have often used chin straps-
      dyed the elastic a "flesh" color and then dancer uses their own makeup
      on the elastic to match to skin-


      On Tue, Mar 15, 2011 at 12:50 AM, Sylvia Rognstad wrote:

      Continuing with my Little Mermaid questions, I've been asked to make
      some headdresses for the ballet. I am a bit out of my element here
      and could use some help or referrals to instructional websites.
      Without using chinstraps, how do you make sure they will stay on for
      balletic dancing?



      Sylvia Rognstad
      Costume/clothing design & construction
      Alterations & home dec
      http://www.ezzyworld.com <http://www.ezzyworld.com>

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

      <http://www.ezzyworld.com>
      <http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/>


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Sylvia Rognstad
      I havent designed them yet so dont know the size. I just thought chin straps wouldn t look very good and that there must be another option, but maybe not.
      Message 2 of 11 , Mar 16 7:02 AM
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        I havent designed them yet so dont know the size. I just thought
        chin straps wouldn't look very good and that there must be another
        option, but maybe not. Have you found elastic that will take dye?



        Sylvia Rognstad
        Costume/clothing design & construction
        Alterations & home dec
        http://www.ezzyworld.com




        On Mar 16, 2011, at 5:57 AM, retshopbuyer@... wrote:

        >
        > any clue as to size of the headdresses?
        >
        > and why no chin straps ?
        > i have often used chin straps-
        > dyed the elastic a "flesh" color and then dancer uses their own makeup
        > on the elastic to match to skin-
        >
        > On Tue, Mar 15, 2011 at 12:50 AM, Sylvia Rognstad wrote:
        >
        > Continuing with my Little Mermaid questions, I've been asked to make
        > some headdresses for the ballet. I am a bit out of my element here
        > and could use some help or referrals to instructional websites.
        > Without using chinstraps, how do you make sure they will stay on for
        > balletic dancing?
        >
        > 
        >
        > Sylvia Rognstad
        > Costume/clothing design & construction
        > Alterations & home dec
        > http://www.ezzyworld.com <http://www.ezzyworld.com>
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        > <http://www.ezzyworld.com>
        > <http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/>
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • MaryB
        If you are making something that can have a wire frame, then you would just make loops to attach them with bobby pins to the dancers head. There was a site
        Message 3 of 11 , Mar 17 7:39 AM
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          If you are making something that can have a wire frame, then you would just make loops to attach them with bobby pins to the dancers head. There was a site (Ovations by Design) that had some fantastic headpieces, but it seems to be gone (and I tried looking on archive.org, but it's database is down right now). The site primakorona.com has some examples of tiaras made in this fashion. Tutu.com also has photos of headpieces, but they have way more photos on their facebook page than on their website.
          ~mary

          --- In TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com, Sylvia Rognstad <sylvia@...> wrote:
          >
          > I havent designed them yet so dont know the size. I just thought
          > chin straps wouldn't look very good and that there must be another
          > option, but maybe not. Have you found elastic that will take dye?
          >
          > 
          >
          > Sylvia Rognstad
          > Costume/clothing design & construction
          > Alterations & home dec
          > http://www.ezzyworld.com
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > On Mar 16, 2011, at 5:57 AM, retshopbuyer@... wrote:
          >
          > >
          > > any clue as to size of the headdresses?
          > >
          > > and why no chin straps ?
          > > i have often used chin straps-
          > > dyed the elastic a "flesh" color and then dancer uses their own makeup
          > > on the elastic to match to skin-
          > >
          > > On Tue, Mar 15, 2011 at 12:50 AM, Sylvia Rognstad wrote:
          > >
          > > Continuing with my Little Mermaid questions, I've been asked to make
          > > some headdresses for the ballet. I am a bit out of my element here
          > > and could use some help or referrals to instructional websites.
          > > Without using chinstraps, how do you make sure they will stay on for
          > > balletic dancing?
          > >
          > > 
          > >
          > > Sylvia Rognstad
          > > Costume/clothing design & construction
          > > Alterations & home dec
          > > http://www.ezzyworld.com <http://www.ezzyworld.com>
          > >
          > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > >
          > > <http://www.ezzyworld.com>
          > > <http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/>
          > >
          > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > >
          > >
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        • GCKidd
          Oh, there are other options. It s just that the chinstrap is probably the most idiot-proof way to go. There s no worries about someone not pinning things
          Message 4 of 11 , Mar 17 7:54 AM
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            Oh, there are other options. It's just that the chinstrap is probably the most 'idiot-proof' way to go. There's no worries about someone not pinning things on correctly, or having to try and adjust sizes, etc...

            A couple of different approaches I have seen done for different styles of headdress--

            --Start with a basic skull-cap/head-form in buckram. You want it to fit well over the skull, so that the base of it rides (in the back) down where the skull starts to taper down to the neck. Cut a section out of the back, and attach an elastic across that opening, so that it will pull the cap tighter at the base. Natural friction, as a result, pulls it down onto the head.

            --Take your standard headband (the type that girls use to hold their bangs back off their face), and build the headdress on top of that. As long as you aren't making anything too elaborate, they're pretty secure (and you can actually get VERY elaborate with that, as long as the choreography isn't very demanding). And if you can add a few loops of horsehair, they can pin it down for extra stability.

            --And, of course, I've also seen (and made) headdresses with chin straps...both done as concealed elastic and as an integrated part of the design. I've also seen elastic used, but done in such a way that it ran behind the ear and behind the base of the skull (you have to attach the elastic closer to the front for best effect). This is helpful if you've got girls with longer hair, as their hair will completely hide the elastic. Of course, if their hair is up in a bun (as many ballet dancers tend to wear it in performance), then you lose that little advantage...but even with blonde hair (except for really light blondes), the elastic is more unobtrusive than if it's running under the chin.

            --- In TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com, Sylvia Rognstad <sylvia@...> wrote:
            >
            > I havent designed them yet so dont know the size. I just thought
            > chin straps wouldn't look very good and that there must be another
            > option, but maybe not. Have you found elastic that will take dye?
          • Pat Rohrbach
            I made some for Will Rogers Follies and one of the things I did was to cover a skull cap in beads the gold or silver kind at the party store I left them long
            Message 5 of 11 , Mar 17 9:04 AM
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              I made some for Will Rogers Follies and one of the things I did was to cover a skull cap in beads the gold or silver kind at the party store I left them long at the sides and back and short in the bang area. Then I attached with hot glue a big square of Styrofoam to the top of that and then added my feathers and whatever else to that and then when that was done I covered the square with beads as well .The beads really balanced the piece and weight {not to heavy} helped keep it in place. The headdresses were very tall and looked great on the girls however they were just walking the stage not dancing.



              * The wizard of oz is the ultimate chick flick

              two women trying to kill each other over shoes



              From: TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com [mailto:TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of GCKidd
              Sent: Thursday, March 17, 2011 7:54 AM
              To: TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [TheCostumersManifesto] Re: Making headdresses for dance





              Oh, there are other options. It's just that the chinstrap is probably the most 'idiot-proof' way to go. There's no worries about someone not pinning things on correctly, or having to try and adjust sizes, etc...

              A couple of different approaches I have seen done for different styles of headdress--

              --Start with a basic skull-cap/head-form in buckram. You want it to fit well over the skull, so that the base of it rides (in the back) down where the skull starts to taper down to the neck. Cut a section out of the back, and attach an elastic across that opening, so that it will pull the cap tighter at the base. Natural friction, as a result, pulls it down onto the head.

              --Take your standard headband (the type that girls use to hold their bangs back off their face), and build the headdress on top of that. As long as you aren't making anything too elaborate, they're pretty secure (and you can actually get VERY elaborate with that, as long as the choreography isn't very demanding). And if you can add a few loops of horsehair, they can pin it down for extra stability.

              --And, of course, I've also seen (and made) headdresses with chin straps...both done as concealed elastic and as an integrated part of the design. I've also seen elastic used, but done in such a way that it ran behind the ear and behind the base of the skull (you have to attach the elastic closer to the front for best effect). This is helpful if you've got girls with longer hair, as their hair will completely hide the elastic. Of course, if their hair is up in a bun (as many ballet dancers tend to wear it in performance), then you lose that little advantage...but even with blonde hair (except for really light blondes), the elastic is more unobtrusive than if it's running under the chin.

              --- In TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com <mailto:TheCostumersManifesto%40yahoogroups.com> , Sylvia Rognstad <sylvia@...> wrote:
              >
              > I havent designed them yet so dont know the size. I just thought
              > chin straps wouldn't look very good and that there must be another
              > option, but maybe not. Have you found elastic that will take dye?





              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • ~lisa.s
              ... lisa.s ... -- ~lisa.s Gmail com [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              Message 6 of 11 , Mar 17 9:59 AM
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                >
                > Elastic is the way to go; it's safe and secure and from the audience it's
                > barely visible. For some reason, no one has ever let me use a staple gun :)
                > The easiest way to tint the elastic is with makeup--the base the dancer will
                > wear. Stretch the elastic slightly when applying the makeup to make sure it
                > gets into all the nooks and crannies. Also consider using both loops and
                > elastic--the elastic secures the headpiece to the head and pins through the
                > loops holds the headpiece in place.
                >

                lisa.s



                >
                > --- In TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com, Sylvia Rognstad <sylvia@...>
                > wrote:
                > >
                > > I havent designed them yet so dont know the size. I just thought
                > > chin straps wouldn't look very good and that there must be another
                > > option, but maybe not. Have you found elastic that will take dye?
                >
                >
                >


                --
                ~lisa.s <at>Gmail<dot>com


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Marnie Bragg
                Either use beige elastic or soak white elastic in strong hot tea until you get the right colour. [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                Message 7 of 11 , Mar 18 12:15 AM
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                  Either use beige elastic or soak white elastic in strong hot tea until you
                  get the right colour.



                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • brandie_mysillybluehippo
                  I use plastic coated clothesline wire. It s flexable enough to bend yet it s strong enough to hold it s shape. It can be twisted into all sorts of shapes and
                  Message 8 of 11 , Mar 19 7:41 AM
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                    I use plastic coated clothesline wire. It's flexable enough to bend yet it's strong enough to hold it's shape. It can be twisted into all sorts of shapes and then covered with trim or stones or totally covered with fabric or whatever. You can add small loops of thin wire for hairpins or elastic for chin strap. Also if you spiral the clothesline wire at the side of the head it provides a natural grip. Easily adjusted by the dancer by just tweaking a little bit on the spiral. I'll try to post a video this weekend on it.
                    Smiles, Brandie Larsen, Butte Opera House

                    http://www.youtube.com/user/Larsen5678?feature=mhum

                    --- In TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com, Sylvia Rognstad <sylvia@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Continuing with my Little Mermaid questions, I've been asked to make
                    > some headdresses for the ballet. I am a bit out of my element here
                    > and could use some help or referrals to instructional websites.
                    > Without using chinstraps, how do you make sure they will stay on for
                    > balletic dancing?
                    >
                    >
                    > 
                    >
                    > Sylvia Rognstad
                    > Costume/clothing design & construction
                    > Alterations & home dec
                    > http://www.ezzyworld.com
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                  • Sylvia Rognstad
                    Sounds interesting. I d love to see the video.  Sylvia Rognstad Costume/clothing design & construction Alterations & home dec http://www.ezzyworld.com ...
                    Message 9 of 11 , Mar 19 8:03 PM
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                      Sounds interesting. I'd love to see the video.



                      Sylvia Rognstad
                      Costume/clothing design & construction
                      Alterations & home dec
                      http://www.ezzyworld.com




                      On Mar 19, 2011, at 8:41 AM, brandie_mysillybluehippo wrote:

                      > I use plastic coated clothesline wire. It's flexable enough to bend
                      > yet it's strong enough to hold it's shape. It can be twisted into
                      > all sorts of shapes and then covered with trim or stones or totally
                      > covered with fabric or whatever. You can add small loops of thin
                      > wire for hairpins or elastic for chin strap. Also if you spiral the
                      > clothesline wire at the side of the head it provides a natural
                      > grip. Easily adjusted by the dancer by just tweaking a little bit
                      > on the spiral. I'll try to post a video this weekend on it.
                      > Smiles, Brandie Larsen, Butte Opera House
                      >
                      > http://www.youtube.com/user/Larsen5678?feature=mhum
                      >
                      > --- In TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com, Sylvia Rognstad
                      > <sylvia@...> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > Continuing with my Little Mermaid questions, I've been asked to make
                      > > some headdresses for the ballet. I am a bit out of my element here
                      > > and could use some help or referrals to instructional websites.
                      > > Without using chinstraps, how do you make sure they will stay on for
                      > > balletic dancing?
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > 
                      > >
                      > > Sylvia Rognstad
                      > > Costume/clothing design & construction
                      > > Alterations & home dec
                      > > http://www.ezzyworld.com
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      > >
                      >
                      >



                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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