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Re: [TheCostumersManifesto] Mascot/Fur Animal costumes

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  • K Murphy
    Simplicity came out with a really good pattern for a fur mascot head about 10 years ago.  I can t find the number online, but there s a picture of the pattern
    Message 1 of 7 , Nov 19, 2009
      Simplicity came out with a really good pattern for a fur mascot head about 10 years ago.  I can't find the number online, but there's a picture of the pattern envelope at this URL:
       
      http://www.nicodemus.org/fursuit/patterns.php%c2%a0 The pattern envelope appears in the upper left of the upper photo -- it's the one with the tiger on the front.  Unfortunately I no longer have mine and I don't know if it's still available.  Maybe if you email the owner of the site he could tell you the pattern number and you could try to find a copy?
       
      The Simplicity pattern used headliner foam (the same upholstery used in cars, it's a thin knit fused to a 1/4" foam) and faux fur to construct the head.  The eyeholes were covered with circles of plastic window screening (the edges bound with cotton bias tape) and the iris detail was painted on with acrylic paint.
       
      I used the same construction technique many times, and it works very well.  The head is very lightweight and stands up to all kinds of abuse.  It can be washed, but really doesn't need to be, because it sits on the shoulders and does not touch the body.
       
      I have also had great success using open cell foam (the kind used for outdoor furniture cushions), but that has to be contact-cemented together, whereas the headliner foam (which you can usually get at JoAnn Fabrics) can be sewn on your machine.
       
      If you construct a simple "orange slice" type pattern segment, you can use multiples of it (8 is a good number) to create a large, hollow, spherical shape around which many type of features can be created.  As long as the curve of the slice follows the curve of a circle, you will end up with a very nice round shape.




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • mongrelmuppet
      Thanks for the ideas! That last one is an idea I hadn t thought of and is definitely worth a try. My clients would prefer something that rests on the
      Message 2 of 7 , Dec 2, 2009
        Thanks for the ideas! That last one is an idea I hadn't thought of and is definitely worth a try. My clients would prefer something that rests on the shoulders, and isn't molded to a specific head size/shape, since many people are likely to be donning this.

        I have been trying to track down that Simplicity pattern for weeks now. I used to have one, too, but it was lost in a move before I could experiment with it, and I've not had a need since. I've been researching online as well, and came to the same roadblock you did, plus the e-mail address for the owner of nicodemus.org comes back continually as non-deliverable, so I can see that picture, but can't get the pattern number off it to help with the search for the pattern.

        If anyone else comes across this pattern or the number, I'd be very appreciative of knowing about it.

        Thanks again!

        --- In TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com, K Murphy <costumerkate@...> wrote:
        >
        > Simplicity came out with a really good pattern for a fur mascot head about 10 years ago.  I can't find the number online, but there's a picture of the pattern envelope at this URL:
        >  
        > http://www.nicodemus.org/fursuit/patterns.php%c2%a0 The pattern envelope appears in the upper left of the upper photo -- it's the one with the tiger on the front.  Unfortunately I no longer have mine and I don't know if it's still available.  Maybe if you email the owner of the site he could tell you the pattern number and you could try to find a copy?
        >  
        > The Simplicity pattern used headliner foam (the same upholstery used in cars, it's a thin knit fused to a 1/4" foam) and faux fur to construct the head.  The eyeholes were covered with circles of plastic window screening (the edges bound with cotton bias tape) and the iris detail was painted on with acrylic paint.
        >  
        > I used the same construction technique many times, and it works very well.  The head is very lightweight and stands up to all kinds of abuse.  It can be washed, but really doesn't need to be, because it sits on the shoulders and does not touch the body.
        >  
        > I have also had great success using open cell foam (the kind used for outdoor furniture cushions), but that has to be contact-cemented together, whereas the headliner foam (which you can usually get at JoAnn Fabrics) can be sewn on your machine.
        >  
        > If you construct a simple "orange slice" type pattern segment, you can use multiples of it (8 is a good number) to create a large, hollow, spherical shape around which many type of features can be created.  As long as the curve of the slice follows the curve of a circle, you will end up with a very nice round shape.
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • Susan Toker
        You had the link wrong. Go here, it works: http://www.nicodemus.org/index.html Susan ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        Message 3 of 7 , Dec 3, 2009
          You had the link wrong. Go here, it works:
          http://www.nicodemus.org/index.html

          Susan


          On Thu, Dec 3, 2009 at 4:32 AM, mongrelmuppet <mongrelmuppet@...>wrote:

          >
          >
          > Thanks for the ideas! That last one is an idea I hadn't thought of and is
          > definitely worth a try. My clients would prefer something that rests on the
          > shoulders, and isn't molded to a specific head size/shape, since many people
          > are likely to be donning this.
          >
          > I have been trying to track down that Simplicity pattern for weeks now. I
          > used to have one, too, but it was lost in a move before I could experiment
          > with it, and I've not had a need since. I've been researching online as
          > well, and came to the same roadblock you did, plus the e-mail address for
          > the owner of nicodemus.org comes back continually as non-deliverable, so I
          > can see that picture, but can't get the pattern number off it to help with
          > the search for the pattern.
          >
          > If anyone else comes across this pattern or the number, I'd be very
          > appreciative of knowing about it.
          >
          > Thanks again!
          >
          > --- In TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com<TheCostumersManifesto%40yahoogroups.com>,
          > K Murphy <costumerkate@...> wrote:
          > >
          > > Simplicity came out with a really good pattern for a fur mascot head
          > about 10 years ago. I can't find the number online, but there's a picture
          > of the pattern envelope at this URL:
          > >
          > > http://www.nicodemus.org/fursuit/patterns.php The pattern envelope
          > appears in the upper left of the upper photo -- it's the one with the tiger
          > on the front. Unfortunately I no longer have mine and I don't know if it's
          > still available. Maybe if you email the owner of the site he could tell you
          > the pattern number and you could try to find a copy?
          > >
          > > The Simplicity pattern used headliner foam (the same upholstery used in
          > cars, it's a thin knit fused to a 1/4" foam) and faux fur to construct the
          > head. The eyeholes were covered with circles of plastic window screening
          > (the edges bound with cotton bias tape) and the iris detail was painted on
          > with acrylic paint.
          > >
          > > I used the same construction technique many times, and it works very
          > well. The head is very lightweight and stands up to all kinds of abuse. It
          > can be washed, but really doesn't need to be, because it sits on the
          > shoulders and does not touch the body.
          > >
          > > I have also had great success using open cell foam (the kind used for
          > outdoor furniture cushions), but that has to be contact-cemented together,
          > whereas the headliner foam (which you can usually get at JoAnn Fabrics) can
          > be sewn on your machine.
          > >
          > > If you construct a simple "orange slice" type pattern segment, you can
          > use multiples of it (8 is a good number) to create a large, hollow,
          > spherical shape around which many type of features can be created. As long
          > as the curve of the slice follows the curve of a circle, you will end up
          > with a very nice round shape.
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > >
          >
          >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • mongrelmuppet
          Hmmmm....I don t think the other link was entirely wrong, it just goes directly to a certain page of the gentleman s website--the one with the pattern photo.
          Message 4 of 7 , Dec 3, 2009
            Hmmmm....I don't think the other link was entirely wrong, it just goes directly to a certain page of the gentleman's website--the one with the pattern photo.

            That said, I did somehow miss the connection to his livejournal, and I'll try contacting him that way. He should at least know that perhaps the e-mail account from his site seems to have difficulties.

            Thank you!

            --- In TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com, Susan Toker <susantoker@...> wrote:
            >
            > You had the link wrong. Go here, it works:
            > http://www.nicodemus.org/index.html
            >
            > Susan
            >
            >
            > On Thu, Dec 3, 2009 at 4:32 AM, mongrelmuppet <mongrelmuppet@...>wrote:
            >
            > >
            > >
            > > Thanks for the ideas! That last one is an idea I hadn't thought of and is
            > > definitely worth a try. My clients would prefer something that rests on the
            > > shoulders, and isn't molded to a specific head size/shape, since many people
            > > are likely to be donning this.
            > >
            > > I have been trying to track down that Simplicity pattern for weeks now. I
            > > used to have one, too, but it was lost in a move before I could experiment
            > > with it, and I've not had a need since. I've been researching online as
            > > well, and came to the same roadblock you did, plus the e-mail address for
            > > the owner of nicodemus.org comes back continually as non-deliverable, so I
            > > can see that picture, but can't get the pattern number off it to help with
            > > the search for the pattern.
            > >
            > > If anyone else comes across this pattern or the number, I'd be very
            > > appreciative of knowing about it.
            > >
            > > Thanks again!
            > >
            > > --- In TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com<TheCostumersManifesto%40yahoogroups.com>,
            > > K Murphy <costumerkate@> wrote:
            > > >
            > > > Simplicity came out with a really good pattern for a fur mascot head
            > > about 10 years ago. I can't find the number online, but there's a picture
            > > of the pattern envelope at this URL:
            > > >
            > > > http://www.nicodemus.org/fursuit/patterns.php The pattern envelope
            > > appears in the upper left of the upper photo -- it's the one with the tiger
            > > on the front. Unfortunately I no longer have mine and I don't know if it's
            > > still available. Maybe if you email the owner of the site he could tell you
            > > the pattern number and you could try to find a copy?
            > > >
            > > > The Simplicity pattern used headliner foam (the same upholstery used in
            > > cars, it's a thin knit fused to a 1/4" foam) and faux fur to construct the
            > > head. The eyeholes were covered with circles of plastic window screening
            > > (the edges bound with cotton bias tape) and the iris detail was painted on
            > > with acrylic paint.
            > > >
            > > > I used the same construction technique many times, and it works very
            > > well. The head is very lightweight and stands up to all kinds of abuse. It
            > > can be washed, but really doesn't need to be, because it sits on the
            > > shoulders and does not touch the body.
            > > >
            > > > I have also had great success using open cell foam (the kind used for
            > > outdoor furniture cushions), but that has to be contact-cemented together,
            > > whereas the headliner foam (which you can usually get at JoAnn Fabrics) can
            > > be sewn on your machine.
            > > >
            > > > If you construct a simple "orange slice" type pattern segment, you can
            > > use multiples of it (8 is a good number) to create a large, hollow,
            > > spherical shape around which many type of features can be created. As long
            > > as the curve of the slice follows the curve of a circle, you will end up
            > > with a very nice round shape.
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            > > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
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