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Seams

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  • Hope Wright
    Does anyone know what if any difference there is between felled seam and flat felled seam ? Also, what is the original meaning of felled ?
    Message 1 of 9 , Apr 12, 2009
      Does anyone know what if any difference there is between "felled seam" and "flat felled seam"? Also, what is the original meaning of "felled"?
    • caryneska
      ... Check this out: http://www.audioenglish.net/dictionary/felled_seam.htm plus just google felled seam, or flat felled seam...try the Threads magazine
      Message 2 of 9 , Apr 13, 2009
        --- In TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com, "Hope Wright" <hopewsew@...> wrote:
        >
        > Does anyone know what if any difference there is between "felled seam" and "flat felled seam"? Also, what is the original meaning of "felled"?
        >
        Check this out:
        http://www.audioenglish.net/dictionary/felled_seam.htm

        plus just google felled seam, or flat felled seam...try the Threads magazine website...Simplicity Pattern's site has definitions and how- tos. It would be easier for you to just read them rather than typing in or cutting and pasting.
        My two favorite books are the Reader's Digest Complete Book/Guide to sewing-either first edition or revised (really splits hairs, great drawings, although one mitred corner instruction in first edition is lacking a step that was corrected in revised) and the Singer Sewing library for fantastic photos.
      • Don McCunn
        Hope, Checked my fashion dictionaries and they all list flat fell, flat felled, and felled seams as being one and the same thing. As to the etymology I could
        Message 3 of 9 , Apr 13, 2009
          Hope,

          Checked my fashion dictionaries and they all list flat fell, flat felled, and felled seams as being one and the same thing.

          As to the etymology I could not find anything. But the basic definition of felled is "to cause to fall." As the flat felled seam knocks down one seam allowance under another, and then binds both to the garment with a second row of stitches, maybe it is something as simple as that action.

          I have also heard of tailors pounding a seam to get it to lay flat. I wonder if there is something called a "pounded flat felled seam"?

          Best,
          Don McCunn
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/How-to-Make-Sewing-Patterns/

          > Does anyone know what if any difference there is between "felled seam" and "flat felled seam"? Also, what is the original meaning of "felled"?
          >
        • Hope Wright
          Thank you. I had about decided they were the same thing, even though different books describe the process of making them differently. The end result is
          Message 4 of 9 , Apr 13, 2009
            Thank you. I had about decided they were the same thing, even though different books describe the process of making them differently. The end result is pretty much the same. It's what my Gram taught me as "seam and fell" which I think describes it better than flat felled, although I never understood why it was called fell in the first place. I think there was probably some other origin to the word, probably a pronunciation mix-up centuries ago, and it actually meant something other than fall. We will probably never know, I don't think many etymologists care that much about sewing terms to spend any time figuring it out.

            --- In TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com, "Don McCunn" <Don@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hope,
            >
            > Checked my fashion dictionaries and they all list flat fell, flat felled, and felled seams as being one and the same thing.
            >
            > As to the etymology I could not find anything. But the basic definition of felled is "to cause to fall." As the flat felled seam knocks down one seam allowance under another, and then binds both to the garment with a second row of stitches, maybe it is something as simple as that action.
            >
            > I have also heard of tailors pounding a seam to get it to lay flat. I wonder if there is something called a "pounded flat felled seam"?
            >
            > Best,
            > Don McCunn
            > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/How-to-Make-Sewing-Patterns/
            >
            > > Does anyone know what if any difference there is between "felled seam" and "flat felled seam"? Also, what is the original meaning of "felled"?
            > >
            >
          • Keith Burgess
            RE FELLED V FLAT FELLED SEAM. ... Check out these links. Regards, Keith. http://www.instructables.com/id/Flat_felled_Seam_and_2_alternatives/ ...
            Message 5 of 9 , Apr 13, 2009
              RE FELLED "V" FLAT FELLED SEAM.
              >

              Check out these links. Regards, Keith.

              http://www.instructables.com/id/Flat_felled_Seam_and_2_alternatives/
              >

              http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9nsBrWCZ3q8


              >
              >



              --
              �I went to woods because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the
              essential facts of life and see if I could not learn what it had to teach,
              and not, when I came to die, discover that I had not lived.� Henry David
              Thoreau.


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Debbie Lough
              Yep - felled seam, flat felled seam, sew and fell seam, run and fell seam - all different names for exactly the same thing.   As to felled - I have no real
              Message 6 of 9 , Apr 14, 2009
                Yep - felled seam, flat felled seam, sew and fell seam, run and fell seam - all different names for exactly the same thing.
                 
                As to felled - I have no real idea, but an extremely archaic meaning for fell is something narrow - maybe fitting because you trim the seam before you sew it????
                 
                Or maybe something to do with the cutting when you trim, like felling a tree???
                 
                 
                Debbie
                 
                 
                 
                "Does anyone know what if any difference there is between "felled seam" and "flat felled seam"? Also, what is the original meaning of "felled"?"


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Curtis
                ... One possible option may be related to the fact that it s intended to lie flat...like a tree that has been felled (chopped down). Just a guess, but that s
                Message 7 of 9 , Apr 14, 2009
                  --- In TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com, "Hope Wright" <hopewsew@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > It's what my Gram taught me as "seam and fell" which I think describes it better than flat felled, although I never understood why it was called fell in the first place.
                  -----------------------------------------------------------------

                  One possible option may be related to the fact that it's intended to lie flat...like a tree that has been felled (chopped down). Just a guess, but that's actually where I first heard the term 'felled'.
                • Hope Wright
                  I can t seem to get this out of my mind. Another couple of possible origins to felled seams. Celtic fell = that portion of a kilt, from the waist to the seat,
                  Message 8 of 9 , Apr 18, 2009
                    I can't seem to get this out of my mind. Another couple of possible origins to felled seams.

                    Celtic fell = that portion of a kilt, from the waist to the seat, where the pleats are stitched down
                    Old German fel = an animal's skin or hide with its hair, pelt

                    >>> I never understood why it was called fell in the first place. I think there was probably some other origin to the word, and it actually meant something other than fall.
                  • Kathy Hoover
                    ... definition of felled is to cause to fall. According to the Oxford English dictionary online, felled is defined as: 2. Of a seam: Sewn down so as to be
                    Message 9 of 9 , Dec 31, 2011
                      At 12:30 PM 4/13/2009, you wrote:
                      >As to the etymology I could not find anything. But the basic
                      definition of felled is "to cause to fall."

                      According to the Oxford English dictionary online, 'felled' is defined as:
                      "2. Of a seam: Sewn down so as to be level with the material.
                      1885 BRIETZCKE & ROOPER Plain Needlewk. 29 A felled seam, when
                      finished, must lie perfectly flat on both sides."

                      So your seam allowances, which were sticking up, have been 'caused to
                      fall'--as your definition said.

                      And under the verb "fell:"
                      6. To stitch down (the wider of the two edges left projecting by a
                      seam) so that it lies flat over the other edge and leaves a smooth
                      surface on the under-side of the seam. Also, to fell a seam.
                      [Etymological identity with the other senses is not certain; but
                      the general sense 'cause to fall' appears applicable.]
                      1758
                      <http://dictionary.oed.com.www.libproxy.wvu.edu/help/bib/oed2-f2.html#franklin>F<http://dictionary.oed.com.www.libproxy.wvu.edu/help/bib/oed2-f2.html#franklin>RANKLIN
                      Let. Wks. 1887 III. 7 It is to be sewed together, the edges being
                      first felled down. 1842
                      <http://dictionary.oed.com.www.libproxy.wvu.edu/help/bib/oed2-b.html#barham>B<http://dictionary.oed.com.www.libproxy.wvu.edu/help/bib/oed2-b.html#barham>ARHAM
                      Ingol. Leg., Aunt Fanny, Each..began working..'Felling the Seams',
                      and 'whipping the Frill'. 1887 Spons' Househ. Managem., Workroom 891
                      Fell down the turnings, or only overcast them. 1892 Weldon's Ladies'
                      Jrnl. Oct. 73 This opening is turned in once on the wrong side, over
                      which is felled a piece of binding.
                      absol. 1862
                      <http://dictionary.oed.com.www.libproxy.wvu.edu/help/bib/oed2-m4.html#m-t-morrall>M.
                      T.
                      M<http://dictionary.oed.com.www.libproxy.wvu.edu/help/bib/oed2-m4.html#m-t-morrall>ORRALL
                      Needle-making 41 I'm teaching little Mary to gather and to fell.


                      But another interesting part of the definition was that 'fell' also
                      meant: "1. The skin or hide of an animal: a. with the hair, wool,
                      etc. " This definition went back to Beowulf!

                      Obviously where we get "felt," as well. I tried to find a
                      connection, but was not successful--unless the fur or hair of the
                      animal (which is standing up, is 'felled' when it is matted/processed
                      into 'felt.' Maybe I'm pushing this too far....

                      Kathy Hoover

                      >As the flat felled seam knocks down one seam allowance under
                      >another, and then binds both to the garment with a second row of
                      >stitches, maybe it is something as simple as that action.
                      >
                      >Best,
                      >Don McCunn
                      ><http://groups.yahoo.com/group/How-to-Make-Sewing-Patterns/>http://groups.yahoo.com/group/How-to-Make-Sewing-Patterns/
                      >
                      > > Does anyone know what if any difference there is between "felled
                      > seam" and "flat felled seam"? Also, what is the original meaning of "felled"?
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