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Re: audience getting blood on their hands...

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  • Curtis
    As someone who s not only looking at this from the costuming side of the show, but also the directing side, I ve got to ask myself if this director lacks
    Message 1 of 25 , Feb 21, 2009
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      As someone who's not only looking at this from the costuming side of
      the show, but also the directing side, I've got to ask myself if this
      director lacks confidence in his concept of the show, to feel the need
      to resort to what is essentially a cheap ploy at audience
      participation in order to involve them in the show. That's my initial
      reaction when I read about this...then I go into other issues like
      blood on the audience, blood on the plant, blood on the floor (that
      your actors are going to be walking back and forth across for the rest
      of the show, which means blood tracked EVERYWHERE on stage, blood that
      will likely be crusted over by the end of the show if the stage crew
      is going to stick around to mop then, or definitely caked over by the
      next day when the crew would normally mop...not to mention potential
      issues with footing and making the stage surface slick...)

      Directors have to understand that theater is different from movies,
      and there is NO WAY to establish the same degree of realism in the
      effects. They also need to understand that, unless you have the kind
      of budget that shows like Evil Dead have on Broadway, you can't afford
      to splatter the entire theater with stuff and pay a crew to clean it
      up every night. Any boost the theater would get in attendance for the
      show would be lost in paying the cleaning crew (and that before we get
      into the potential lawsuits from irate audience members, the potential
      increased insurance payments due to injured actors, and the
      more-than-likely extra cleaning fees charged by the company renting
      the plant.) People don't go to see Little Shop expecting a
      splatter-fest...it's a dark comedy. Unless you can find a funny way
      to incorporate something like that, it doesn't fit the show. Besides,
      it also defeats the scene...the dentist is supposed to be SECRETLY fed
      to the plant, Seymour is trying to cover up the fact that he killed
      the dentist (well, was going to kill him, at least--but he dismembered
      him) and is also trying to keep the secret of the plant's growth--so,
      logically, the LAST thing he would want is somebody (even an anonymous
      stranger from the audience) helping him feed the dentist to the plant.
      Nothing like throwing the premise of the show out the window for a
      cheap ten-second gimmick...
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