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Costume Pattern Storage Question

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  • Ally
    Hello All. Hope everyone is safe from the hurricanes now. I was wondering what others do in regards to storage for pattern pieces you use often. The patterns
    Message 1 of 5 , Sep 15, 2008
      Hello All. Hope everyone is safe from the hurricanes now.

      I was wondering what others do in regards to storage for pattern
      pieces you use often.

      The patterns that I use over and over I have transfered onto fabric
      for each individual size. So, I have a template for each size of
      bodices, sleeves, etc. However, as you can imagine with all of the
      different sizes, this can become a lot of weight and take up a lot of
      space.

      I was wondering if anyone has any ideas on how to stores these
      pieces. I currently have the pattern and all paper/fabric pieces in a
      2 gallon size ziploc bag with the picture on top. Does anyone have a
      better suggestion?

      Thank you in advance.

      Ally.
    • Kate Murphy
      Hi Ally: Not to be a know-it all here, but I think you should be somewhat cautious using fabric pattern pieces repeatedly. It has been my experience (over the
      Message 2 of 5 , Sep 16, 2008
        Hi Ally:

        Not to be a know-it all here, but I think you should be somewhat
        cautious using fabric pattern pieces repeatedly. It has been my
        experience (over the past 20 years) that fabric is not stable enough
        to be a reliable pattern. Fabric patterns are great for fittings, but
        they can easily be pulled out of shape and are therefore not as
        precise as brown paper (which is the industry standard at the
        theaters where I have worked.) In my experience, once the fabric
        pattern has been fitted it is usually transfered to brown paper
        and "trued up" (eg checked for accuracy on grainlines, symmetry,
        etc.) before the show fabric is cut. Brown paper is also less
        expensive and MUCH easier to store. Paper sloper patterns for a
        particular show can be pinned to hangers on a rack during production
        so they are always available -- they don't have to be handled with
        the same care as fabric mock-ups.

        Once the show is over, the paper pattern pieces are marked and
        labeled and can be folded up into oversized mailer envelopes stacked
        vertically in bins. I currently have hundreds of shows stored this
        way -- very compact and lightweight.

        Again, sorry this is not a direct answer to your original question,
        but I think the system you already have is about the best you can do
        with fabric pattern pieces. They shouldn't be hung or stored
        vertically in any case, because that will increase the amount they
        will skew due to stretch.

        Kate Murphy
        Chicago









        --- In TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com, "Ally" <allyskates@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > Hello All. Hope everyone is safe from the hurricanes now.
        >
        > I was wondering what others do in regards to storage for pattern
        > pieces you use often.
        >
        > The patterns that I use over and over I have transfered onto fabric
        > for each individual size. So, I have a template for each size of
        > bodices, sleeves, etc. However, as you can imagine with all of the
        > different sizes, this can become a lot of weight and take up a lot
        of
        > space.
        >
        > I was wondering if anyone has any ideas on how to stores these
        > pieces. I currently have the pattern and all paper/fabric pieces
        in a
        > 2 gallon size ziploc bag with the picture on top. Does anyone have
        a
        > better suggestion?
        >
        > Thank you in advance.
        >
        > Ally.
        >
      • geneiak
        when i worked for a company that produced walk around characters, we made copies of any pattern that was used repeatedly with the original stored for making
        Message 3 of 5 , Sep 17, 2008
          when i worked for a company that produced walk around characters, we
          made copies of any pattern that was used repeatedly with the original
          stored for making more patterns later-
          the copies were made of oaktag and covered with clear contact paper
          on both sides-
          these patterns were used a lot-
          they were hung on pattern hooks and then hung from a rack in the
          pattern room-

          for patterns that were made for a one shot deal, they were made on
          craft paper and then saved in a manila envelope by show name and then
          stored in bankers boxes-

          retshopbuyer-

          -- In TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com, "Kate Murphy"
          <costumerkate@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hi Ally:
          >
          > Not to be a know-it all here, but I think you should be somewhat
          > cautious using fabric pattern pieces repeatedly. It has been my
          > experience (over the past 20 years) that fabric is not stable
          enough
          > to be a reliable pattern. Fabric patterns are great for fittings,
          but
          > they can easily be pulled out of shape and are therefore not as
          > precise as brown paper (which is the industry standard at the
          > theaters where I have worked.) In my experience, once the fabric
          > pattern has been fitted it is usually transfered to brown paper
          > and "trued up" (eg checked for accuracy on grainlines, symmetry,
          > etc.) before the show fabric is cut. Brown paper is also less
          > expensive and MUCH easier to store. Paper sloper patterns for a
          > particular show can be pinned to hangers on a rack during
          production
          > so they are always available -- they don't have to be handled with
          > the same care as fabric mock-ups.
          >
          > Once the show is over, the paper pattern pieces are marked and
          > labeled and can be folded up into oversized mailer envelopes
          stacked
          > vertically in bins. I currently have hundreds of shows stored this
          > way -- very compact and lightweight.
          >
          > Again, sorry this is not a direct answer to your original question,
          > but I think the system you already have is about the best you can
          do
          > with fabric pattern pieces. They shouldn't be hung or stored
          > vertically in any case, because that will increase the amount they
          > will skew due to stretch.
          >
          > Kate Murphy
          > Chicago
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > --- In TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com, "Ally" <allyskates@>
          > wrote:
          > >
          > > Hello All. Hope everyone is safe from the hurricanes now.
          > >
          > > I was wondering what others do in regards to storage for pattern
          > > pieces you use often.
          > >
          > > The patterns that I use over and over I have transfered onto
          fabric
          > > for each individual size. So, I have a template for each size of
          > > bodices, sleeves, etc. However, as you can imagine with all of
          the
          > > different sizes, this can become a lot of weight and take up a
          lot
          > of
          > > space.
          > >
          > > I was wondering if anyone has any ideas on how to stores these
          > > pieces. I currently have the pattern and all paper/fabric pieces
          > in a
          > > 2 gallon size ziploc bag with the picture on top. Does anyone
          have
          > a
          > > better suggestion?
          > >
          > > Thank you in advance.
          > >
          > > Ally.
          > >
          >
        • jilbyfuzz
          I have to agree with Kate, as much as it is a but of a pain sometimes to have the costumes on a pattern hook on a rack in the pattern room. It makes keeping
          Message 4 of 5 , Sep 17, 2008
            I have to agree with Kate, as much as it is a but of a pain sometimes
            to have the costumes on a pattern hook on a rack in the pattern room.
            It makes keeping them neat and orderly much easier. This is what my
            tutor from the Sydney Opera had us do in our wardrobe.

            I agree with the fabric pattern = bad idea. I just tranfer my markings
            over to proper pattern paper after the fitting. Granted I keep the
            mock up until the costume is complete, but otherwise I don't use it as
            a pattern.

            My theater uses quart and gallon size ziplocks to hold our patterns.
            We had a problem with moisture getting to our patterns. This way we
            can see what is in the envalope, and still lable it. I just keep mine
            organized by women vs men vs children. Then by type bodice vs skirt.
            I keep my good slopers made of tick blown paper cardstock in a
            cylidical carrier. A friend who was an artist gave it to me to protect
            them.
          • Debbie Lough
            I wouldn t use fabric, because it s too likely to misshape, and I wouldn t use brown paper because it s too flimsy and undurable.   Pattern manilla or pattern
            Message 5 of 5 , Sep 18, 2008
              I wouldn't use fabric, because it's too likely to misshape, and I wouldn't use brown paper because it's too flimsy and undurable.
               
              Pattern manilla or pattern board (or pattern plastic) would be the correct material to use, and then it should ideally be hung from pattern racks if you have the space.
               
              Failing that, a heavy duty paper (stronger than normal brown paper), folded and stored in filing cabinets or similar).

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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