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How do you manage your costume wardrobe?

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  • jilbyfuzz
    We recently had an issue at our theater where a guest costumer came into our labled, organized costume wardrobe and ::ticks off on fingers:: Dumped a Z
    Message 1 of 15 , Aug 27, 2008
      We recently had an issue at our theater where a guest costumer came
      into our labled, organized costume wardrobe and ::ticks off on
      fingers:: Dumped a Z rack of children's costumes on the floor,
      pulled costumes out and IF the put them back put them back in the
      completly wrong place (IE women's dress in mens suits, military
      jackets in petticoats) Tubs were left open and stuff hanging out.
      When confronted about the condition of the wardrobe, their only
      repsonce was "Welcome to theater!" and to walk off. ::holds head::
      We spent 6 months getting it back in order after the last staff
      costumer left it a disaster, and now this happens.

      We are trying to put together a list of 'rules' that we can include
      on the wall, and a list of expectations for our costumers
      contracts. We have already had to add a clause once this year
      because another costumer majorly goofed up. It seems we will have
      to add more after this fiasco.

      What rules would you recomend? It seems common sense checks it's
      self at the door, for some reason.

      So far I have:
      1) Leave all drama on the stage. It stays out of here.
      2) If you take it off a rack, put it back where you got it.
      3) There is a "Next show" rack. Put all costumes for the next show
      on that rack.
      4) If you need help moving costumes, ask someone. Do not empty
      racks with out wardrobe supervisors permission.
      5) Do not throw away any costumes with out authorization from
      wardrobe supervisor. Unless replacement value is under $2.00

      Any additions you can think of?
    • queenortart
      ... I wouldn t give people the opportunity to make a decision about such things, because I don t trust them! There s so much capacity for them to decide that
      Message 2 of 15 , Aug 28, 2008
        >
        > 5) Do not throw away any costumes with out authorization from
        > wardrobe supervisor. Unless replacement value is under $2.00

        I wouldn't give people the opportunity to make a decision about such
        things, because I don't trust them! There's so much capacity for them
        to decide that something is worthless because they don't know the
        effort it took you to source it.

        Who authorises them to have access in the first place? Should you have
        someone escorting anyone at least the first time they are in the
        wardrobe area, or is it a free for all. If it is then I think you are
        optimistic that a list will make a difference. That's not to say you
        shouldn't do it, but unless you have a way to enforce it then you may
        just get very frustrated along the way...

        Sue
      • Stickfries@aol.com
        I am not sure if you are a for profit rental house, but the big key for me?that helps is restocking fees.? Also, if you have a good staff keep on top of the
        Message 3 of 15 , Aug 28, 2008
          I am not sure if you are a for profit rental house, but the big key for me?that helps is restocking fees.? Also, if you have a good staff keep on top of the costumer before they leave with the costumes to ensure that everything is put away.? If they give you attitude like that one designer did?create a black list.? My shop will not rent to certain people any longer.? But, knowing that they will be watched, reprimanded, black listed?and charged for their negligence usually deters people in my case.


          -----Original Message-----
          From: jilbyfuzz <shanntarra@...>
          To: TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Wed, 27 Aug 2008 10:32 am
          Subject: [TheCostumersManifesto] How do you manage your costume wardrobe?






          We recently had an issue at our theater where a guest costumer came
          into our labled, organized costume wardrobe and ::ticks off on
          fingers:: Dumped a Z rack of children's costumes on the floor,
          pulled costumes out and IF the put them back put them back in the
          completly wrong place (IE women's dress in mens suits, military
          jackets in petticoats) Tubs were left open and stuff hanging out.
          When confronted about the condition of the wardrobe, their only
          repsonce was "Welcome to theater!" and to walk off. ::holds head::
          We spent 6 months getting it back in order after the last staff
          costumer left it a disaster, and now this happens.

          We are trying to put together a list of 'rules' that we can include
          on the wall, and a list of expectations for our costumers
          contracts. We have already had to add a clause once this year
          because another costumer majorly goofed up. It seems we will have
          to add more after this fiasco.

          What rules would you recomend? It seems common sense checks it's
          self at the door, for some reason.

          So far I have:
          1) Leave all drama on the stage. It stays out of here.
          2) If you take it off a rack, put it back where you got it.
          3) There is a "Next show" rack. Put all costumes for the next show
          on that rack.
          4) If you need help moving costumes, ask someone. Do not empty
          racks with out wardrobe supervisors permission.
          5) Do not throw away any costumes with out authorization from
          wardrobe supervisor. Unless replacement value is under $2.00

          Any additions you can think of?






          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Kate
          It sounded to me like your biggest problems were with guest costumers, not people who are regular people in your theater.  There are divas everywhere, not
          Message 4 of 15 , Aug 28, 2008
            It sounded to me like your biggest problems were with "guest" costumers, not people who are regular people in your theater.  There are divas everywhere, not just on the stage.  Perhaps if they had an "assistant" that was from your costume dept. to help them pull costumes and put things away. 

            Kat
            Massachusetts

            --- On Wed, 8/27/08, jilbyfuzz <shanntarra@...> wrote:
            From: jilbyfuzz <shanntarra@...>
            Subject: [TheCostumersManifesto] How do you manage your costume wardrobe?
            To: TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Wednesday, August 27, 2008, 10:32 AM











            We recently had an issue at our theater where a guest costumer came

            into our labled, organized costume wardrobe and ::ticks off on

            fingers:: Dumped a Z rack of children's costumes on the floor,

            pulled costumes out and IF the put them back put them back in the

            completly wrong place (IE women's dress in mens suits, military

            jackets in petticoats) Tubs were left open and stuff hanging out.

            When confronted about the condition of the wardrobe, their only

            repsonce was "Welcome to theater!" and to walk off. ::holds head::

            We spent 6 months getting it back in order after the last staff

            costumer left it a disaster, and now this happens.



            We are trying to put together a list of 'rules' that we can include

            on the wall, and a list of expectations for our costumers

            contracts. We have already had to add a clause once this year

            because another costumer majorly goofed up. It seems we will have

            to add more after this fiasco.



            What rules would you recomend? It seems common sense checks it's

            self at the door, for some reason.



            So far I have:

            1) Leave all drama on the stage. It stays out of here.

            2) If you take it off a rack, put it back where you got it.

            3) There is a "Next show" rack. Put all costumes for the next show

            on that rack.

            4) If you need help moving costumes, ask someone. Do not empty

            racks with out wardrobe supervisors permission.

            5) Do not throw away any costumes with out authorization from

            wardrobe supervisor. Unless replacement value is under $2.00



            Any additions you can think of?





























            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Melissa McConnell
            I d recommend writing all of those on a 2 x 4 and smacking the next person that does that upside the head with it. I would add to the list of rules and
            Message 5 of 15 , Aug 28, 2008
              I'd recommend writing all of those on a 2 x 4 and smacking the next
              person that does that upside the head with it.

              I would add to the list of rules and additions to contract a contract
              for this all on it's own. Make it very clear that they need to be
              respectful, put things back where they were, keep things neat and
              orderly and that if they don't, they'll be paying for the extra time
              it takes to clean it all back up. If they have to sign something
              that;s not mixedin with everything else, maybe it will stick in their
              heads better.

              M


              On Aug 27, 2008, at 9:32 AM, jilbyfuzz wrote:

              > We recently had an issue at our theater where a guest costumer came
              > into our labled, organized costume wardrobe and ::ticks off on
              > fingers:: Dumped a Z rack of children's costumes on the floor,
              > pulled costumes out and IF the put them back put them back in the
              > completly wrong place (IE women's dress in mens suits, military
              > jackets in petticoats) Tubs were left open and stuff hanging out.
              > When confronted about the condition of the wardrobe, their only
              > repsonce was "Welcome to theater!" and to walk off. ::holds head::
              > We spent 6 months getting it back in order after the last staff
              > costumer left it a disaster, and now this happens.
              >
              > We are trying to put together a list of 'rules' that we can include
              > on the wall, and a list of expectations for our costumers
              > contracts. We have already had to add a clause once this year
              > because another costumer majorly goofed up. It seems we will have
              > to add more after this fiasco.
              >
              > What rules would you recomend? It seems common sense checks it's
              > self at the door, for some reason.
              >
              > So far I have:
              > 1) Leave all drama on the stage. It stays out of here.
              > 2) If you take it off a rack, put it back where you got it.
              > 3) There is a "Next show" rack. Put all costumes for the next show
              > on that rack.
              > 4) If you need help moving costumes, ask someone. Do not empty
              > racks with out wardrobe supervisors permission.
              > 5) Do not throw away any costumes with out authorization from
              > wardrobe supervisor. Unless replacement value is under $2.00
              >
              > Any additions you can think of?
              >
              >
              >



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • jilbyfuzz
              Our theater has it s own wardrobe shop. We don t rent out. We had our wardrobe supervisor give the guy the first walk through, and show him where everything
              Message 6 of 15 , Aug 28, 2008
                Our theater has it's own wardrobe shop. We don't rent out. We had
                our wardrobe supervisor give the guy the first walk through, and show
                him where everything was, then left him to work. When he returned a
                day later to get something out of there..... disaster area. He
                doubles at running the box office most days, so he can't be in there
                100% of the time. He does work with us when we return costumes AFTER a
                show to make sure there are put back correctly. We had too many shows
                where people just stuck them on the nearest rack and didn't come back
                to put them away. They don't pay him enough to pick up after everyone.

                95% of the people that come through our door, know better. It's that
                5% who don't that makes life difficult.
              • bonnie carter
                Is this a paid position? I d make sure there was a certain part of their payment that wasn t paid until the end after everything has been put back the way it
                Message 7 of 15 , Aug 28, 2008
                  Is this a paid position? I'd make sure there was a certain part of their payment that wasn't paid until the end after everything has been put back the way it goes according to their contract.

                  Just recently we've had to change our rules. We used to let certain people have access to the shop in the evening when the staff isn't present. But it just gets messed up, so now we lock everything up. Supervision is the only thing that's worked for us.

                  If supervision isn't an option, I don't think that makes a huge difference, even with a staff of 3-5 people, things get messed up. I think we spend half of our time moving things, reorganizing, cleaning etc.

                  I really don't think that posted rules will help much (tried that). :) I know it's pessimistic, but here's what's worked for us:

                  --clean everything so that it's neat and organized even to the untrained eye
                  --label everything very clearly. No "unlabeled" divisions. If pants are by size then color but color isn't labeled, it won't stay that way.
                  --don't make the organization too complicated, folks will give up
                  --make a clear contract with very simply stated expectations, rules, etc. Also be sure to make clear what your end of the contract is (and yes, withhold part of the pay if things are left a mess--but be ready to document it)
                  --educate people on what it's taken to attain and manage your inventory. Show them (more than tell them) that you respect these things that you have and why they should also respect them.
                  --expect a certain amount of "mess". Sometimes it's just the way things are. Even my staff members sometimes put something in the wrong place or in the wrong size, etc. There's a certain amount of that that's just going to happen that's not from being careless or rude. (I understand that's certianly not the case with this person).

                  Personally, I wouldn't let anyone throw anything away. We've found things upstairs that are worth FAR more than you would expect them to be worth. I don't even let my staff decide what to throw away, only I weed things out.


                  Bonnie Dalager
                  www.dramaticallycorrect.com
                • Curtis
                  ... --NOBODY is allowed unsupervised access to costume storage. I have been having a helluva time with my production staff on this one, to the result of
                  Message 8 of 15 , Aug 28, 2008
                    --- In TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com, "jilbyfuzz"
                    <shanntarra@...> wrote:
                    > So far I have:
                    > 1) Leave all drama on the stage. It stays out of here.
                    > 2) If you take it off a rack, put it back where you got it.
                    > 3) There is a "Next show" rack. Put all costumes for the next show
                    > on that rack.
                    > 4) If you need help moving costumes, ask someone. Do not empty
                    > racks with out wardrobe supervisors permission.
                    > 5) Do not throw away any costumes with out authorization from
                    > wardrobe supervisor. Unless replacement value is under $2.00
                    >
                    > Any additions you can think of?

                    --NOBODY is allowed unsupervised access to costume storage.

                    I have been having a helluva time with my production staff on this
                    one, to the result of multiple costume items having mysteriously
                    vanished without any idea of whether they were taken by employees of
                    another department, one of our designers, or one of the staff (we had
                    a past director whose early departure from our staff coincided with
                    the disappearance of several pairs of mens fashion jeans and a few
                    other, much more difficult to replace costumes...)

                    --You tell US what you want to see, and we will get it for you.

                    I have a much easier time tracking what goes out when the designers
                    tell me what they're looking for, or, alternately, we go in together
                    and they ask to see certain items on the higher racks, which I'll pull
                    down for them. I still end up having to put everything back...but at
                    least I know where everything goes, so I'm not beating my head against
                    the wall a couple of months later when I find a bunch of sweaters
                    amongst the blouses or corduroys in the dress slacks, stuff like that.

                    If having a member of your staff escort and assist guest designers is
                    not a practical option, then I would also recommend the restocking
                    fee...and make it known that it may be charged at your discretion,
                    depending on how much extra work is involved in restocking. That way,
                    conscientious customers won't be scared away...and sloppy customers
                    will be more attentive.

                    Also, that 'welcome to theater' comment? I hate that attitude (and I
                    don't often use that term). That may be the way things normally run,
                    but that doesn't mean it's the way they SHOULD run (I got the same
                    thing from our designer last spring, when we got the costumes from her
                    so late that we had first fittings three days before dress rehearsals...)
                  • Kate Murphy
                    I agree with Curtis -- emphatically. The only way to avoid problems is supervison -- and padlocks: lots of them! The kind that only you have the keys to. I do
                    Message 9 of 15 , Aug 28, 2008
                      I agree with Curtis -- emphatically. The only way to avoid problems
                      is supervison -- and padlocks: lots of them! The kind that only you
                      have the keys to.

                      I do have one additional comment. If you can't dedicate a staff
                      member to this job, an official "Grumpy Old Lady" (or "Grouchy Old
                      Man") volunteer can be most effective. In exchange for free tickets
                      and invitations to all your parties, a rabidly protective volunteer
                      who loves theater and thrives on a bit of power can do WONDERS for
                      your costume storage issues. At my first job out of college (as Tech
                      Director at a small theatre in Long Beach CA) we had a lady volunteer
                      in charge of costumes who was so universally feared by everyone on
                      the staff that no one - NO ONE - ever messed with her. And no one
                      (not even I) ever got a key to that storage room or set foot inside
                      of it without her.

                      The result? A beautifully maintained costume collection, where
                      nothing ever went missing.

                      Anyone with limited resources should explore The Grumpy Volunteer
                      Plan.

                      Good luck!

                      Kate Murphy
                      Chicago

                      --- In TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com, "Curtis" <gckidd@...>
                      wrote:
                      >
                      > --- In TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com, "jilbyfuzz"
                      > <shanntarra@> wrote:
                      > > So far I have:
                      > > 1) Leave all drama on the stage. It stays out of here.
                      > > 2) If you take it off a rack, put it back where you got it.
                      > > 3) There is a "Next show" rack. Put all costumes for the next
                      show
                      > > on that rack.
                      > > 4) If you need help moving costumes, ask someone. Do not empty
                      > > racks with out wardrobe supervisors permission.
                      > > 5) Do not throw away any costumes with out authorization from
                      > > wardrobe supervisor. Unless replacement value is under $2.00
                      > >
                      > > Any additions you can think of?
                      >
                      > --NOBODY is allowed unsupervised access to costume storage.
                      >
                      > I have been having a helluva time with my production staff on this
                      > one, to the result of multiple costume items having mysteriously
                      > vanished without any idea of whether they were taken by employees of
                      > another department, one of our designers, or one of the staff (we
                      had
                      > a past director whose early departure from our staff coincided with
                      > the disappearance of several pairs of mens fashion jeans and a few
                      > other, much more difficult to replace costumes...)
                      >
                      > --You tell US what you want to see, and we will get it for you.
                      >
                      > I have a much easier time tracking what goes out when the designers
                      > tell me what they're looking for, or, alternately, we go in together
                      > and they ask to see certain items on the higher racks, which I'll
                      pull
                      > down for them. I still end up having to put everything back...but
                      at
                      > least I know where everything goes, so I'm not beating my head
                      against
                      > the wall a couple of months later when I find a bunch of sweaters
                      > amongst the blouses or corduroys in the dress slacks, stuff like
                      that.
                      >
                      > If having a member of your staff escort and assist guest designers
                      is
                      > not a practical option, then I would also recommend the restocking
                      > fee...and make it known that it may be charged at your discretion,
                      > depending on how much extra work is involved in restocking. That
                      way,
                      > conscientious customers won't be scared away...and sloppy customers
                      > will be more attentive.
                      >
                      > Also, that 'welcome to theater' comment? I hate that attitude (and
                      I
                      > don't often use that term). That may be the way things normally
                      run,
                      > but that doesn't mean it's the way they SHOULD run (I got the same
                      > thing from our designer last spring, when we got the costumes from
                      her
                      > so late that we had first fittings three days before dress
                      rehearsals...)
                      >
                    • jilbyfuzz
                      Yes it is a paid position. They are addiing a clause to our contracts to cover making sure you leave the wardrobe in good condition. Our supervisor spends
                      Message 10 of 15 , Aug 28, 2008
                        Yes it is a paid position. They are addiing a clause to our contracts
                        to cover making sure you leave the wardrobe in good condition.
                        Our supervisor spends 5-10 hours a week just working on getting it
                        completly organized. You have to expect alittle disorganization, but
                        if things are at least with in the realm of the right place we are on
                        a good track. He may just do a walk through after someone has been in
                        there just to make sure it isn't trashed.

                        I know most will try to say they didn't know the rules, but they can
                        be posted and noted in our contracts; so we can't say we haven't read
                        them at least.

                        Thank you for your suggestions. At least it is a step in the right
                        direction.

                        Oh I did have one question. How do you organize and store your wigs
                        and facial appliances. We have run out of shelf space for our wings,
                        and are trying to think of a space saving way to store them that won't
                        destroy them. We will still keep the good quality human hair wigs on
                        the heads though.
                      • Bonnie
                        ... I ll tell you how we do ours, but I m not really in charge of their care, just the area where they re stored--so I don t know if this is the best way,
                        Message 11 of 15 , Aug 28, 2008
                          > Oh I did have one question. How do you organize and store your wigs
                          > and facial appliances.

                          I'll tell you how we do ours, but I'm not really in charge of their
                          care, just the area where they're stored--so I don't know if this is
                          the "best" way, it's just our way.

                          We keep our short wigs in drawers flipped inside out.

                          The larger or longer wigs we put inside out then in large bags (from
                          Uline, they're not airtight). We used to keep them on heads but this
                          is so much more efficient. They really stay suprisingly nice. We mark
                          the bag with a description so they can be found easilly, then put them
                          in drawers similar to pattern drawers. The drawers are marked short
                          brown, long, colonial, etc.

                          We also include a postcard we designed on vista print in each bag
                          called "caring for your wig" so that if volunteers in the show don't
                          know how to handle or care for a wig, they have pointers. Most of our
                          stylists don't need the info, but it's nice that it's there.

                          Bonnie
                          www.dramaticallycorrect.com
                        • David
                          We were advised by a wig master at one of the large regionals to do the same thing (stored inside out in breathable bags) and have had wonderful success. It is
                          Message 12 of 15 , Aug 29, 2008
                            We were advised by a wig master at one of the large regionals to do
                            the same thing (stored inside out in breathable bags) and have had
                            wonderful success. It is also musch more space efficient than storing
                            on heads.

                            David Juby
                            Head of Wardrobe
                            Theatre Sheridan
                            --- In TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com, "Bonnie"
                            <avgsuperheroine@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > > Oh I did have one question. How do you organize and store your
                            wigs
                            > > and facial appliances.
                            >
                            > I'll tell you how we do ours, but I'm not really in charge of their
                            > care, just the area where they're stored--so I don't know if this
                            is
                            > the "best" way, it's just our way.
                            >
                            > We keep our short wigs in drawers flipped inside out.
                            >
                            > The larger or longer wigs we put inside out then in large bags
                            (from
                            > Uline, they're not airtight). We used to keep them on heads but
                            this
                            > is so much more efficient. They really stay suprisingly nice. We
                            mark
                            > the bag with a description so they can be found easilly, then put
                            them
                            > in drawers similar to pattern drawers. The drawers are marked
                            short
                            > brown, long, colonial, etc.
                            >
                            > We also include a postcard we designed on vista print in each bag
                            > called "caring for your wig" so that if volunteers in the show
                            don't
                            > know how to handle or care for a wig, they have pointers. Most of
                            our
                            > stylists don't need the info, but it's nice that it's there.
                            >
                            > Bonnie
                            > www.dramaticallycorrect.com
                            >
                          • geneiak
                            i don t understand why someone would have access to the storage area without a theatre employee along- and why would anyone other than the costume supervisory
                            Message 13 of 15 , Aug 30, 2008
                              i don't understand why someone would have access to the storage area
                              without a theatre employee along-
                              and why would anyone other than the costume supervisory person throw
                              something away ?

                              retshopbuyer

                              --- In TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com, queenortart
                              <queenortart@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > >
                              > > 5) Do not throw away any costumes with out authorization from
                              > > wardrobe supervisor. Unless replacement value is under $2.00
                              >
                              > I wouldn't give people the opportunity to make a decision about such
                              > things, because I don't trust them! There's so much capacity for
                              them
                              > to decide that something is worthless because they don't know the
                              > effort it took you to source it.
                              >
                              > Who authorises them to have access in the first place? Should you
                              have
                              > someone escorting anyone at least the first time they are in the
                              > wardrobe area, or is it a free for all. If it is then I think you
                              are
                              > optimistic that a list will make a difference. That's not to say you
                              > shouldn't do it, but unless you have a way to enforce it then you
                              may
                              > just get very frustrated along the way...
                              >
                              > Sue
                              >
                            • Randolph Keator
                              Thank you ! ! I was waiting for someone to say that. The first time it happens should be the LAST time it happens. Think of those costumes as your tools. How
                              Message 14 of 15 , Sep 2, 2008
                                Thank you ! ! I was waiting for someone to say that. The first time it happens should be the LAST time it happens. Think of those costumes as your tools. How valuable are your tools to you ? Once again this is where written contracts come in extremely handy. Kids up to . . oh about age 8 ( who should be adult supervised anyway) maybe I'd give one pass. For adults; absolutely no tolerance and it would/should be strictly adhered to. So much easier to be the "bad" guy right from the get-go.
                                ----- Original Message -----
                                From: geneiak
                                To: TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com
                                Sent: Saturday, August 30, 2008 9:53 PM
                                Subject: [TheCostumersManifesto] Re: How do you manage your costume wardrobe?


                                i don't understand why someone would have access to the storage area
                                without a theatre employee along-
                                and why would anyone other than the costume supervisory person throw
                                something away ?

                                retshopbuyer

                                ---

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                              • barneshaesemeyer
                                LOL, Love the costume Nazi idea! Donna ... problems ... tickets ... Tech ... volunteer ... of ... with ... designers ... together ... back...but ... designers
                                Message 15 of 15 , Sep 12, 2008
                                  LOL, Love the costume Nazi idea!


                                  Donna

                                  --- In TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com, "Kate Murphy"
                                  <costumerkate@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > I agree with Curtis -- emphatically. The only way to avoid
                                  problems
                                  > is supervison -- and padlocks: lots of them! The kind that only you
                                  > have the keys to.
                                  >
                                  > I do have one additional comment. If you can't dedicate a staff
                                  > member to this job, an official "Grumpy Old Lady" (or "Grouchy Old
                                  > Man") volunteer can be most effective. In exchange for free
                                  tickets
                                  > and invitations to all your parties, a rabidly protective volunteer
                                  > who loves theater and thrives on a bit of power can do WONDERS for
                                  > your costume storage issues. At my first job out of college (as
                                  Tech
                                  > Director at a small theatre in Long Beach CA) we had a lady
                                  volunteer
                                  > in charge of costumes who was so universally feared by everyone on
                                  > the staff that no one - NO ONE - ever messed with her. And no one
                                  > (not even I) ever got a key to that storage room or set foot inside
                                  > of it without her.
                                  >
                                  > The result? A beautifully maintained costume collection, where
                                  > nothing ever went missing.
                                  >
                                  > Anyone with limited resources should explore The Grumpy Volunteer
                                  > Plan.
                                  >
                                  > Good luck!
                                  >
                                  > Kate Murphy
                                  > Chicago
                                  >
                                  > --- In TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com, "Curtis" <gckidd@>
                                  > wrote:
                                  > >
                                  > > --- In TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com, "jilbyfuzz"
                                  > > <shanntarra@> wrote:
                                  > > > So far I have:
                                  > > > 1) Leave all drama on the stage. It stays out of here.
                                  > > > 2) If you take it off a rack, put it back where you got it.
                                  > > > 3) There is a "Next show" rack. Put all costumes for the next
                                  > show
                                  > > > on that rack.
                                  > > > 4) If you need help moving costumes, ask someone. Do not empty
                                  > > > racks with out wardrobe supervisors permission.
                                  > > > 5) Do not throw away any costumes with out authorization from
                                  > > > wardrobe supervisor. Unless replacement value is under $2.00
                                  > > >
                                  > > > Any additions you can think of?
                                  > >
                                  > > --NOBODY is allowed unsupervised access to costume storage.
                                  > >
                                  > > I have been having a helluva time with my production staff on this
                                  > > one, to the result of multiple costume items having mysteriously
                                  > > vanished without any idea of whether they were taken by employees
                                  of
                                  > > another department, one of our designers, or one of the staff (we
                                  > had
                                  > > a past director whose early departure from our staff coincided
                                  with
                                  > > the disappearance of several pairs of mens fashion jeans and a few
                                  > > other, much more difficult to replace costumes...)
                                  > >
                                  > > --You tell US what you want to see, and we will get it for you.
                                  > >
                                  > > I have a much easier time tracking what goes out when the
                                  designers
                                  > > tell me what they're looking for, or, alternately, we go in
                                  together
                                  > > and they ask to see certain items on the higher racks, which I'll
                                  > pull
                                  > > down for them. I still end up having to put everything
                                  back...but
                                  > at
                                  > > least I know where everything goes, so I'm not beating my head
                                  > against
                                  > > the wall a couple of months later when I find a bunch of sweaters
                                  > > amongst the blouses or corduroys in the dress slacks, stuff like
                                  > that.
                                  > >
                                  > > If having a member of your staff escort and assist guest
                                  designers
                                  > is
                                  > > not a practical option, then I would also recommend the restocking
                                  > > fee...and make it known that it may be charged at your discretion,
                                  > > depending on how much extra work is involved in restocking. That
                                  > way,
                                  > > conscientious customers won't be scared away...and sloppy
                                  customers
                                  > > will be more attentive.
                                  > >
                                  > > Also, that 'welcome to theater' comment? I hate that attitude
                                  (and
                                  > I
                                  > > don't often use that term). That may be the way things normally
                                  > run,
                                  > > but that doesn't mean it's the way they SHOULD run (I got the same
                                  > > thing from our designer last spring, when we got the costumes
                                  from
                                  > her
                                  > > so late that we had first fittings three days before dress
                                  > rehearsals...)
                                  > >
                                  >
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