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Re: Liquid Antiperspertant or other products

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  • Curtis
    ... T-shirts might help...it would be one more layer to sweat through before drenching the costume itself (it would also be that much more body heat held in,
    Message 1 of 8 , Jul 22, 2008
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      --- In TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com, "susig" <Susig@...> wrote:
      >
      > I have worked a small amount with No Sweat but have no idea what to do
      > with somtehing on this large of scale.
      > Any Ideas?

      T-shirts might help...it would be one more layer to sweat through
      before drenching the costume itself (it would also be that much more
      body heat held in, likely increasing the amount of sweat
      generated)...they would, at the very least, be an effective measure
      against your costumes getting yellowed in the armpits.

      There are a couple of brands of antiperspirant on the market now that
      are labelled as 'clinical strength' (yes, they do actually have
      prescription-strength antiperspirants...) You might try one of those.

      I would be very careful going about this, however...sweating is one of
      the body's methods of regulating temperature, and if it's hot enough
      to make them sweat that much, and you are 'turning off' the perspiring
      mechanism, you could find yourself surrounded by a lot of cases of
      heat exhaustion. I suspect a lot of the problem with resolve itself
      as your actors acclimate to the conditions...encourage them to do what
      they can to become accustomed to the heat and humidity in the area
      (don't spend all day indoors with the AC on, for instance...I'm not
      saying to stay outdoors all the time, but a couple of extra hours each
      day outside can make a huge difference.)

      We have a similar issue with our performers at the park...the first
      few really hot days have everybody struggling to get their costumes as
      dry as possible before the next show (each show does multiple
      performances each day, and they're only 30-45 minutes from the end of
      one to the start of the next). They still end up sweating like crazy
      (you can't do a full-out dance show without a lot of sweat, especially
      when the temperature is hovering near 100), but after the second week
      or so, it changes a lot.
    • geneiak
      If you did doubles on the shirts would they have a chance to change b4 that scene ? retshopbuyer
      Message 2 of 8 , Jul 22, 2008
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        If you did doubles on the shirts would they have a chance to change b4
        that scene ?

        retshopbuyer

        --- In TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com, "susig" <Susig@...> wrote:
        >
        > I am working on a outdoor show in Nauvoo Ill. I am having a major
        > problem with the actors being soaking wet 2 minutes into a vignette
        > where they are on a small stage very close to the audience. The shirts
        > on our male actors are so soaking it wet, that they are finding it
        > embrassing.
        > When they are on our main stage it is not as noticable.
        >
        > I have worked a small amount with No Sweat but have no idea what to do
        > with somtehing on this large of scale.
        > Any Ideas?
        > Susi Geertsen
        > Salt Lake City
        >
      • Carolyn Stirling
        One idea: You could sew dress shields into the garments. -- Carolyn Liquid Antiperspertant or other products Posted by: susig Susig@yahoo.com susig Mon Jul
        Message 3 of 8 , Jul 22, 2008
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          One idea:
          You could sew dress shields into the garments.

          --

          Carolyn


          Liquid Antiperspertant or other products
          Posted by: "susig" Susig@... susig
          Mon Jul 21, 2008 12:13 pm (PDT)
          I am working on a outdoor show in Nauvoo Ill. I am having a major
          problem with the actors being soaking wet 2 minutes into a vignette
          where they are on a small stage very close to the audience. The shirts
          on our male actors are so soaking it wet, that they are finding it
          embrassing.
          When they are on our main stage it is not as noticable.

          I have worked a small amount with No Sweat but have no idea what to do
          with somtehing on this large of scale.
          Any Ideas?
          Susi Geertsen
          Salt Lake City
        • BainaAshanti
          You can try corstarch, works for babies and doesn t cake up like talcum powder. Low cost and very efficient, just make sure not to use so much that they
          Message 4 of 8 , Jul 22, 2008
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            You can try corstarch, works for babies and doesn't cake up like talcum powder. Low cost and very efficient, just make sure not to use so much that they produce a "cloud" when they move too much! the t-shirt idea was good, as well, or a layer of corn starch then a t-shirt over it so that it doesn't get into the costume itself. You can get the stuff at any drug store, apply to stomach, under arms, wherever needed.
          • Jennifer
            Having them wear a t-shirt and use cornstarch is your best bet. You might have more than one t-shirt for them, so they can change into a fresh one when the
            Message 5 of 8 , Jul 25, 2008
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              Having them wear a t-shirt and use cornstarch is your best bet. You
              might have more than one t-shirt for them, so they can change into a
              fresh one when the first one gets wet. The t-shirts will also keep
              the outer shirt from looking "see through" when it does become wet. I
              toured w/Broadway shows for years, playing all different venues -
              outside, no air, not enough air - this is what has worked the best for me.

              Good luck!
              Jen




              --- In TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com, "susig" <Susig@...> wrote:
              >
              > I am working on a outdoor show in Nauvoo Ill. I am having a major
              > problem with the actors being soaking wet 2 minutes into a vignette
              > where they are on a small stage very close to the audience. The shirts
              > on our male actors are so soaking it wet, that they are finding it
              > embrassing.
              > When they are on our main stage it is not as noticable.
              >
              > I have worked a small amount with No Sweat but have no idea what to do
              > with somtehing on this large of scale.
              > Any Ideas?
              > Susi Geertsen
              > Salt Lake City
              >
            • costumepirate
              I dont know if y all have heard of Kleinert s. They have every pit pad in every imaginable style, t-shirts with pit pads sewn in, anti- sweat t-shirts, etc.
              Message 6 of 8 , Jul 29, 2008
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                I dont know if y'all have heard of Kleinert's. They have every pit
                pad in every imaginable style, t-shirts with pit pads sewn in, anti-
                sweat t-shirts, etc. Check them out here
                http://www.kleinertsshields.com/index.php

                Emme Hall
                Costume Manager
                Ford's Theatre


                --- In TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com, "Jennifer"
                <Jolica17@...> wrote:
                >
                > Having them wear a t-shirt and use cornstarch is your best bet.
                You
                > might have more than one t-shirt for them, so they can change into
                a
                > fresh one when the first one gets wet. The t-shirts will also keep
                > the outer shirt from looking "see through" when it does become
                wet. I
                > toured w/Broadway shows for years, playing all different venues -
                > outside, no air, not enough air - this is what has worked the best
                for me.
                >
                > Good luck!
                > Jen
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > --- In TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com, "susig" <Susig@>
                wrote:
                > >
                > > I am working on a outdoor show in Nauvoo Ill. I am having a
                major
                > > problem with the actors being soaking wet 2 minutes into a
                vignette
                > > where they are on a small stage very close to the audience. The
                shirts
                > > on our male actors are so soaking it wet, that they are finding
                it
                > > embrassing.
                > > When they are on our main stage it is not as noticable.
                > >
                > > I have worked a small amount with No Sweat but have no idea what
                to do
                > > with somtehing on this large of scale.
                > > Any Ideas?
                > > Susi Geertsen
                > > Salt Lake City
                > >
                >
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