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Stain / Make-up removal help

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  • jilbyfuzz
    I ve been on a soap box lately because of how BADLY a previous costumer (her first show, and most likely her last) for this theater. As I was hired to just
    Message 1 of 6 , May 21 8:14 AM
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      I've been on a soap box lately because of how BADLY a previous
      costumer (her first show, and most likely her last) for this theater.
      As I was hired to just costume my current show I don't have the right
      to fuss at what the previous costumer did but now that she has left
      the theater and is not returning phone calls I've been asked/hired to
      clean up her mess. (Don't ask details it is that bad...)

      I've got a brocade & faux leather doublet that the actor got white
      cream base all over the inside & outside of the mandarin collar, and
      on the upper shoulders. He also got it all over the thighs of his
      tuxedo pants. Belive me I was thankful that it wasn't grease paint!

      What I am looking for are:
      1) What would be the best method to get out cream based make up from
      heavy fabric & pleather?
      2) If it HAD been grease paint, what could I do?
      3) To make sure this doesnt' happen again, what can I do to the collar
      to make sure the make up on his neck doesn't damage the actual fabric.
      4) What can my actor do to prevent getting make up on his costume
      while he is applying it (other than not wearing it while putting it on
      in the first place) ?

      Thanks for all your advice.
    • Pierre & Sandy Pettinger
      ... Best bet - talk to a good dry cleaners - maybe even go directly to the main office/plant to try to get someone who actually knows cleaning, instead of
      Message 2 of 6 , May 21 11:03 PM
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        At 10:14 AM 5/21/2008, you wrote:

        >I've got a brocade & faux leather doublet that the actor got white
        >cream base all over the inside & outside of the mandarin collar, and
        >on the upper shoulders. He also got it all over the thighs of his
        >tuxedo pants. Belive me I was thankful that it wasn't grease paint!
        >
        >What I am looking for are:
        >1) What would be the best method to get out cream based make up from
        >heavy fabric & pleather?

        Best bet - talk to a good dry cleaners - maybe even go directly to
        the main office/plant to try to get someone who actually knows
        cleaning, instead of just clerking a desk. Once it's clean, then you
        can apply preventive measures. Removal depends partly on fiber
        content of the fabrics.

        >2) If it HAD been grease paint, what could I do?

        See above.

        >3) To make sure this doesnt' happen again, what can I do to the collar
        >to make sure the make up on his neck doesn't damage the actual fabric.

        You could baste in a light lining of matching cotton fabric, that
        could either be removed and washed occasionally, or replaced easily if needed.

        >4) What can my actor do to prevent getting make up on his costume
        >while he is applying it (other than not wearing it while putting it on
        >in the first place) ?

        Get a bunch of the cheap salon capes at a beauty supply house, and
        make everyone use them. In addition, they need to tuck tissues
        around the collar (and don't close it up tightly until makeup is
        done, if possible). You've seen bits on TV where they're preparing
        some newsman or politician for a TV appearance - they tuck in tissues
        all around. The cape keeps things off the rest of the costume (like
        the tux pants).

        >Thanks for all your advice.

        HTH,
        Sandy

        "Those Who Fail To Learn History
        Are Doomed to Repeat It;
        Those Who Fail To Learn History Correctly --
        Why They Are Simply Doomed.

        Achemdro'hm
        "The Illusion of Historical Fact"
        -- C.Y. 4971

        Andromeda
      • lanorte1@aol.com
        I ve had a lot of luck with Carbona bar soap, which I ve purchased at a local fabric store. It s worked well getting old make-up out of shirt collars,
        Message 3 of 6 , May 22 6:24 AM
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          I've had a lot of luck with Carbona bar soap, which I've purchased at a local
          fabric store. It's worked well getting old make-up out of shirt collars,
          oil-based stains, grass stains, blood, etc. A bar of the soap is under $2 and
          lasts a long, long time.

          Donna



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        • Cheryl McCarron
          Carbona also makes liquid formulas for specific types of stains. They have about six different formulas - the one that removes makeup works really well. Also,
          Message 4 of 6 , May 22 6:47 AM
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            Carbona also makes liquid formulas for specific types of stains. They have about six different formulas - the one that removes makeup works really well.

            Also, if the actor powders his makeup well to set it, less should come off on his costume.

            Using a piece of the fabric and basting it to cover the collar is a great idea. I know people do that with ruffs to avoid having to clean the ruff as often and it is very effective.

            -Cheryl McCarron
            NYC Fabric Finder

            jilbyfuzz <shanntarra@...> wrote:
            I've been on a soap box lately because of how BADLY a previous
            costumer (her first show, and most likely her last) for this theater.
            As I was hired to just costume my current show I don't have the right
            to fuss at what the previous costumer did but now that she has left
            the theater and is not returning phone calls I've been asked/hired to
            clean up her mess. (Don't ask details it is that bad...)

            I've got a brocade & faux leather doublet that the actor got white
            cream base all over the inside & outside of the mandarin collar, and
            on the upper shoulders. He also got it all over the thighs of his
            tuxedo pants. Belive me I was thankful that it wasn't grease paint!

            What I am looking for are:
            1) What would be the best method to get out cream based make up from
            heavy fabric & pleather?
            2) If it HAD been grease paint, what could I do?
            3) To make sure this doesnt' happen again, what can I do to the collar
            to make sure the make up on his neck doesn't damage the actual fabric.
            4) What can my actor do to prevent getting make up on his costume
            while he is applying it (other than not wearing it while putting it on
            in the first place) ?

            Thanks for all your advice.







            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Curtis
            ... I have actually had a lot of success removing makeup from costumes with Spot Shot. It s a carpet cleaner, in an aerosol can, but I ve taken eyeliner
            Message 5 of 6 , May 22 8:31 AM
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              --- In TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com, "jilbyfuzz"
              <shanntarra@...> wrote:
              >
              > 1) What would be the best method to get out cream based make up from
              > heavy fabric & pleather?
              > 2) If it HAD been grease paint, what could I do?

              I have actually had a lot of success removing makeup from costumes
              with Spot Shot. It's a carpet cleaner, in an aerosol can, but I've
              taken eyeliner pencil out of dupioni silk, lipstick off poly-cotton,
              black airbrush makeup out of felt (even managed to get acrylic craft
              paint out of wool carpet...imagine that, using a carpet cleaner for
              carpet?) It did not, however, work to take dried hairspray out of
              silk satin (long story, and we still use that one as an example of
              what NOT to do...)

              You DEFINITELY want to test it someplace unobtrusive, first,
              preferably on a scrap of matching fabric, to make sure there won't be
              any problems with the cleaning solvents in the spray reacting to the
              fibers in the fabric. However, most fabrics I've tried it on haven't
              had any problems.

              > 3) To make sure this doesnt' happen again, what can I do to the collar
              > to make sure the make up on his neck doesn't damage the actual fabric.

              The only real option is to somehow line the collar with material that
              you can remove after shows. Scotchgard or similar treatments will
              make the makeup easier to remove if they're applied before the costume
              is worn, but you run the risk of a potential reaction to the
              treatment, and fifteen minutes before a show is a lousy time to have
              someone develop a rash on their neck (or anywhere else, for that matter).

              > 4) What can my actor do to prevent getting make up on his costume
              > while he is applying it (other than not wearing it while putting it on
              > in the first place) ?

              Don't apply makeup on his neck. Blend his base into his normal skin
              color somewhere above the collar line. If this is not an option, the
              tissues and drapings mentioned in earlier responses are pretty much
              your only bet.
              >
              > Thanks for all your advice.
              >
            • Alexadbw@aol.com
              Someone recommended using a clarifying shampoo such as Neutrogena, to remove greasy make up and collar stains. Alexa In a message dated 5/24/2008 4:33:53 P.M.
              Message 6 of 6 , May 24 3:08 PM
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                Someone recommended using a clarifying shampoo such as Neutrogena, to remove
                greasy make up and collar stains.
                Alexa


                In a message dated 5/24/2008 4:33:53 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
                nycfabricfinder@... writes:

                Carbona also makes liquid formulas for specific types of stains. They have
                about six different formulas - the one that removes makeup works really well.





                **************Get trade secrets for amazing burgers. Watch "Cooking with
                Tyler Florence" on AOL Food.
                (http://food.aol.com/tyler-florence?video=4&?NCID=aolfod00030000000002)


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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