Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

RE: [TheCostumersManifesto] General costume care guidelines

Expand Messages
  • Marietta Greene
    i think you have it. Oh also about repairs - 5 minutes before curtain really isn t the time unless it just happened and it is major surgery - re pantyhose or
    Message 1 of 16 , May 19, 2008
      i think you have it. Oh also about repairs
      - 5 minutes before curtain really isn't the time unless it just happened and it is major surgery
      - re pantyhose or tights - we give out 3-4 pair at the beginnning of each run we ask that the actor lets us know when they blow through the first pair (especially before a 5 show weekend) - not when they are on their last pair.


      i go through this on almost every show - and i have been criticized by the powers that be that it is wrong of me to assume that young and new actors do not know these basic rules. Well, when they throw their costume on the floor (and not because of a quick change) and eat in costume (and do not understand what the problem with this is), of course i have every right to make this speech and post a sign in or near the dressing rooms.

      i would say just make it all polite and sticky sweet sounding. :)


      To: TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.comFrom: shanntarra@...: Mon, 19 May 2008 15:29:59 +0000Subject: [TheCostumersManifesto] General costume care guidelines




      The old costumer of our VERY small theater finally retired. Our theater is a 'gateway' theater for young actors/ techs to get into the local theater scene. The problem is that most of the actors/techs don't know the typical 'rules' when it comes to costume things. A couple of the normal stage managers and I are putting together a little hand out/ booklet of expectations from actors. So far we have things like: Don't eat in costumeDon't smoke in costumeUse please and thank you.You are only allowed to act like a child off stage if you are one. Hang up/ Put away your costumes in their correct places. Unless your character is supose to be rumpled and dirty, don't leave your costume pieces where they can get rumpled and dirty. If you are put in charge of something, and lose it, who's fault is that? If it isn't yours don't touch it without permission. Most techs will gladly explain what and why they are doing something, but 10 minutes from curtain is NOT the time to do it. Costumes are supose to fit comfortably, if something is bothering you and you don't speak up, who's fault is that? Anything else any one wants to add? Suggestions are very much welcomed.






      _________________________________________________________________
      Give to a good cause with every e-mail. Join the i�m Initiative from Microsoft.
      http://im.live.com/Messenger/IM/Join/Default.aspx?souce=EML_WL_ GoodCause

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • keridwyn_98
      i always put up a COSTUME CONCERNS sheet on the call board (ours is in the dressing room). the actors are instructed to write down any costume issues that are
      Message 2 of 16 , May 19, 2008
        i always put up a COSTUME CONCERNS sheet on the call board (ours is
        in the dressing room). the actors are instructed to write down any
        costume issues that are to be corrected by the wardrobe person
        (busted buttons, split seams, etc.). even if they tell wardrobe
        about the problem, they MUST write it down or they can expect to have
        it NOT addressed.
        and if the costume that needs attention isnt on it's designated
        hanger on it's designated rack, then wardrobe cant find it to fix it,
        and again they can expect to have it NOT addressed.
        which is yet another reason to hang things up where they go.

        wardrobe cant remember everything every actor whines about (i dont
        use the word whine to them)...and only real issues are addressed (we
        dont do "this costume makes my butt look big").

        i love this "hand out" idea...may i copy it?

        blessings
        paula


        --- In TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com, "jilbyfuzz"
        <shanntarra@...> wrote:
        >
        > The old costumer of our VERY small theater finally retired. Our
        > theater is a 'gateway' theater for young actors/ techs to get into
        > the local theater scene. The problem is that most of the
        > actors/techs don't know the typical 'rules' when it comes to
        costume
        > things.
        >
        > A couple of the normal stage managers and I are putting together a
        > little hand out/ booklet of expectations from actors.
        >
        > So far we have things like:
        > Don't eat in costume
        > Don't smoke in costume
        > Use please and thank you.
        > You are only allowed to act like a child off stage if you are one.
        > Hang up/ Put away your costumes in their correct places. Unless
        your
        > character is supose to be rumpled and dirty, don't leave your
        > costume pieces where they can get rumpled and dirty.
        > If you are put in charge of something, and lose it, who's fault is
        > that?
        > If it isn't yours don't touch it without permission.
        > Most techs will gladly explain what and why they are doing
        > something, but 10 minutes from curtain is NOT the time to do it.
        > Costumes are supose to fit comfortably, if something is bothering
        > you and you don't speak up, who's fault is that?
        >
        > Anything else any one wants to add? Suggestions are very much
        > welcomed.
        >
      • Kathryn Parke
        You mean to say, ...and you don t speak up, WHOSE fault is that? Who s is a contraction for who is. You want the possessive form. KP jilbyfuzz
        Message 3 of 16 , May 19, 2008
          You mean to say, "...and you don't speak up, WHOSE fault is that?"

          "Who's" is a contraction for "who is." You want the possessive form.

          KP



          jilbyfuzz <shanntarra@...> wrote: The old costumer of our VERY small theater finally retired. Our
          theater is a 'gateway' theater for young actors/ techs to get into
          the local theater scene. The problem is that most of the
          actors/techs don't know the typical 'rules' when it comes to costume
          things.

          A couple of the normal stage managers and I are putting together a
          little hand out/ booklet of expectations from actors.

          So far we have things like:
          Don't eat in costume
          Don't smoke in costume
          Use please and thank you.
          You are only allowed to act like a child off stage if you are one.
          Hang up/ Put away your costumes in their correct places. Unless your
          character is supose to be rumpled and dirty, don't leave your
          costume pieces where they can get rumpled and dirty.
          If you are put in charge of something, and lose it, who's fault is
          that?
          If it isn't yours don't touch it without permission.
          Most techs will gladly explain what and why they are doing
          something, but 10 minutes from curtain is NOT the time to do it.
          Costumes are supose to fit comfortably, if something is bothering
          you and you don't speak up, who's fault is that?

          Anything else any one wants to add? Suggestions are very much
          welcomed.







          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • cyncorley
          I always take a minute to do the Hi i m the anal-retentive costume designer speech at 1st dress and do a demo on how to hang up trousers correctly and remind
          Message 4 of 16 , May 19, 2008
            I always take a minute to do the "Hi i'm the anal-retentive costume
            designer" speech at 1st dress and do a demo on how to hang up trousers
            correctly and remind them of the rules. Another couple of rules to
            mention might include: don't wear any items(like personal jewelry)
            onstage not given to you(or OK'd) by the costumer and please arrive at
            the theatre clean, wearing deodorant and underwear. I actually have a
            box of emergency backup underwear for actors and use it waaay more than
            I wish I had to!
          • jilbyfuzz
            Thanks for the suggestions everyone. If any one wants to use, feel free to use this list. After walking into a theater last night and seeing the mess that
            Message 5 of 16 , May 20, 2008
              Thanks for the suggestions everyone. If any one wants to use, feel
              free to use this list. After walking into a theater last night and
              seeing the mess that another costumer left me to deal with ...
              please pass this along to who ever you feel you need to. (::twitchs
              at the memory of the layers of grease paint all over the elizabethan
              doublet. It had been there for 6 weeks::)

              Here is the list so far, if you can think of more go ahead and add
              them. :)

              • Politeness counts, -really- (be nice to everyone), no one
              here is more important as anyone else
              • Pick up your stuff and put it in the right place. If it
              isn't your stuff, maybe it's there for a reason, please don't just
              move it unless asked.
              • If you don't understand something, ask. Most of us will be
              happy to explain what we're doing, but 10 minutes before curtain is
              not generally a good time...
              • If something seems wrong, tell someone. If you can't think
              of the right person, tell the stage manager.
              • The costumes/lights/props are not designed to annoy you, if
              there's a problem, see above
              • Off stage, only chronologic children are allowed to act as
              such.
              • If you are given charge of something and loose it, well,
              whose fault is that?
              • RESPECT your costume
              • Take a shower the day of the production and wear deodorant
              • After the show, hang up your costume
              • Off stage, No smoking, eating, or drinking anything but
              water while in costume, on stage that is your character's business.
              • The costumer is here to support you, but we are not your
              slaves
              • If there is something 'wrong' with your costume or you just
              don't like something, talk to the costumer/director. Don't change it
              on your own. A costume represents as much a perspective on the
              character as the lines/blocking.
              • Don't take pictures of yourself or other actors in costume
              without
              permission from the designer/director/technical dir. You are wearing
              their art work, respect it.
            • Curtis
              RE: costume grief sheets--I tell our performers every year that if it isn t important enough for them to write down, it isn t important enough for us to fix
              Message 6 of 16 , May 20, 2008
                RE: costume 'grief' sheets--I tell our performers every year that if
                it isn't important enough for them to write down, it isn't important
                enough for us to fix it...which has led to them going on stage a few
                times with a blown seam in their pantleg safety-pinned shut, but once
                that happens, we rarely have a repeat problem.

                I also try and get them to understand that they are wearing the
                designer's reputation on their backs, as well as their dressers' and
                wardrobe crews' reputations...so they are, under NO circumstances, to
                make arbitrary changes to their costume. If I, or the production
                manager, or director say okay, then they're fine. If not...well, our
                director probably wouldn't do much, he's very non-confrontational, but
                our production manager has no problem reading the riot act to anyone.
                (He made it official policy this year that NOBODY is to go outside
                the theater onto the park with ANY part of their costume
                on...including shoes, fishnets or tights, or t-shirts, even if they're
                covered up by regular clothes. I wanted to jump up and down and cheer.)

                I'm very excited this year, we've actually got an experienced dresser
                who is already raising hell with performers for not hanging pants
                properly, shoving hats into corners or piling stuff on top of them,
                failing to return props to their proper location after the show,
                etc...since I'm not there most evenings, it's nice to have someone
                that will take that initiative, who is actually backstage to see
                whether or not their words are having any effect (too many of our
                dressers are too concerned with trying to stay friendly with the
                performers...this lady is old enough to be Mom...or even Grandma...to
                all of them, so she really doesn't care if they think she's nice or not.)

                Some other points we enforce--we'll gladly provide additional
                socks/t-shirts/etc...if you can explain why you need them (I had to
                put this policy in place after performers kept wearing their socks
                home after the show...)

                Please please PLEASE scrub the back of your neck when you
                bathe/shower--nothing creates quite the same sense of revulsion as
                seeing a shirt that started the evening crisp and white end the
                evening with a monster case of ring around the collar...

                Wear properly supporting undergarments!!! Boxers and sports bras
                don't count! And you don't have to wear the same ones every
                night...but they better fit identically, or else! (Any young woman
                who's serious about becoming a performer should invest in a GOOD bra,
                even if it may happen to be a little pricey. You'll get your money's
                worth out of it!)

                The tech crew have names. These names are NOT Sound Guy, Stage Dude,
                Mister Lighting Man, etc. Learn their names, and use them. And I
                better not hear anyone screaming 'Dresser!!!' unless it's a joke.

                We will clean your costumes as often as is practical for us. As much
                as you hate wearing them when they're all sweaty, at least it's YOUR
                sweat. We don't even get that bit of relief when we have to gather
                them up and haul them to the cleaners or put them in the washer.

                We also issue each guy a safety pin, with his name on it, for each
                pair of socks we give him. If he pins his socks together, they make
                it back to his accessory box. If not, he has to gather up loose socks
                off the counter. It takes two seconds to pin them together, and ten
                seconds to sort them if they aren't pinned. Which one is more time
                effective? (I've also done the same thing with the women, if they use
                tights/fishnets which they've cut the waistbands out of, since that
                removes any place where we could effectively label them.)

                Please tell your wardrobe crew about costume problems AS SOON AS YOU
                NOTICE THEM, not when they become such a large issue that you can't
                work with them anymore. It's often the difference between a couple of
                minutes with a needle and thread, or half an hour (or more) of
                intensive repairs.

                Unless you are SPECIFICALLY told/choreographed to do it, DON'T DRAG
                YOUR TOES. I had a $100 pair of dance shoes that was almost totally
                destroyed within two weeks of starting the season last year because
                the performer did that. Amazing, how fast he learned to pick up his
                toes when they told him he'd have to pay for replacements if they
                couldn't be fixed.

                A lot of these are kind of specific to the venue in which I work most
                of the time...but they can kind of be adapted to any location, each
                one has its own challenges.

                Now, if I could just get our costume designer to stick to the schedule
                for fittings, so I could actually get a chance to see, and maybe even
                work on, costumes before we start dress rehearsals...*shakes his head*
                Those of you who work strictly as designers, please don't ever do to
                your production staff what's being done to me this year. It's
                virtually killed any enthusiasm I have for what I'm doing right now.
              • Anne Redish
                I ll just add that we started giving each performer (as needed) a LABELLED dollar store delicates bag , and in which they can put their own dress shields,
                Message 7 of 16 , May 21, 2008
                  I'll just add that we started giving each performer (as needed) a
                  LABELLED dollar store "delicates bag", and in which they can put
                  their own dress shields, hosiery, bras, socks etc,. That saves the
                  labelling nightmares, saves time for the post show crew and saves us
                  from handling the sweaty stuff. We do label everything possible
                  anyway in case of muddles. Mostly the colours aren't mixed anyway, or
                  if they are, poly non-fuzzy black socks and most dark bras will do
                  NOTHING significant to a standard white load! (we do check them first)

                  Did anyone mention NO SCENTS! Some of the worst smells to get out of
                  costumes are perfumes! I insist on unscented deodorants and NO body
                  spays! I plead allergies in the crew, wether we have them or not!

                  Also we did a show a while back where written labels were not an
                  option / not clear enough .. all ALL ALL ! items were the approx same
                  colour! GREY! And most of the 20 actors had about 12 items, as well
                  as doubling for some. A sorting nightmare, esp in the cutting stage.
                  We used non-run poly/lycra snippets (1 inch square - ish) of
                  different coloured or printed fabric for every characters' pieces and
                  items right from the fabric stage, through the run. The actors
                  learned their colour / pattern and that became the labelling. Luckily
                  there were no garment changes in the dark, or we would have had to
                  use fluorescent swatches! :) ! Shoes were the exception ...yes all
                  the same colour .. all painted .. where the written labels were fine.




                  Anne Redish
                  Department of Drama,
                  Queen's University,
                  Kingston, Ontario
                  613-533-6000 x75359
                  483-3245 cell
                  ar11@...
                • Paula McWhirter-Buck
                  what is a robber ? ok...BEFORE you think it s someone that takes something that doesnt belong to them ... it s in the costume plot at the back of the MIRACLE
                  Message 8 of 16 , May 24, 2008
                    what is a "robber"?
                    ok...BEFORE you think "it's someone that takes something that doesnt belong to them"...
                    it's in the costume plot at the back of the MIRACLE WORKER script as a costume piece for kate keller.

                    and, can anyone help me find an image of victorian era body pads (knee, elbow, and shin), so i can maybe make them?

                    thanks so much for any help.

                    brightest of blessings,
                    paula mcwhirter-buck
                  • Alexadbw@aol.com
                    In a message dated 5/24/2008 11:15:29 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time, keridwyn_98@yahoo.com writes: what is a robber ? it s in the costume plot at the back of the
                    Message 9 of 16 , May 24, 2008
                      In a message dated 5/24/2008 11:15:29 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
                      keridwyn_98@... writes:


                      what is a "robber"?
                      it's in the costume plot at the back of the MIRACLE WORKER script as a
                      costume piece for kate keller.
                      I'm sorry that I don't know, but if you don't find what you need top know,
                      it is possible that you can contact the people in Tuscumbia, Alabama who
                      present "The Miracle Worker" on the Grounds of Ivy Green, Helen Keller's
                      birthplace.

                      _http://www.helenkellerbirthplace.org/miracleworker/miracleworker.html_
                      (http://www.helenkellerbirthplace.org/miracleworker/miracleworker.html)

                      Good Luck






                      **************Get trade secrets for amazing burgers. Watch "Cooking with
                      Tyler Florence" on AOL Food.
                      (http://food.aol.com/tyler-florence?video=4&?NCID=aolfod00030000000002)


                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • geneiak
                      no answer but a nice pic of the two http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,335410,00.html In TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com, Paula McWhirter-Buck ...
                      Message 10 of 16 , May 24, 2008
                        no answer but a nice pic of the two
                        http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,335410,00.html


                        In TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com, Paula McWhirter-Buck
                        <keridwyn_98@...> wrote:
                        >
                        >
                        > what is a "robber"?
                        > ok...BEFORE you think "it's someone that takes something that
                        doesnt belong to them"...
                        > it's in the costume plot at the back of the MIRACLE WORKER script
                        as a costume piece for kate keller.
                        >
                        > and, can anyone help me find an image of victorian era body pads
                        (knee, elbow, and shin), so i can maybe make them?
                        >
                        > thanks so much for any help.
                        >
                        > brightest of blessings,
                        > paula mcwhirter-buck
                        >
                      • Alexadbw@aol.com
                        This question intrigued me for some reason and so I began to search. Apparently a robber is simply a robe. It comes from the fact that long ago clothing was
                        Message 11 of 16 , May 24, 2008
                          This question intrigued me for some reason and so I began to search.
                          Apparently a robber is simply a robe.
                          It comes from the fact that long ago clothing was hard to come by,so when
                          thieves overtook travelers, they almost always stole their clothing along with
                          other valuables.( I searched with words + origins + robe + robber )
                          Now the question is "why didn't they just say robe"? Seems like showing off
                          to me!
                          Alexa


                          In a message dated 5/24/2008 11:15:29 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
                          keridwyn_98@... writes:

                          what is a "robber"?




                          **************Get trade secrets for amazing burgers. Watch "Cooking with
                          Tyler Florence" on AOL Food.
                          (http://food.aol.com/tyler-florence?video=4&?NCID=aolfod00030000000002)


                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Paula McWhirter-Buck
                          actually...in other places in the costume plot (where it came up to begin with)...for kate, it DOES call for a robe as well as a robber. i m just trying to
                          Message 12 of 16 , May 24, 2008
                            actually...in other places in the costume plot (where it came up to begin with)...for kate, it DOES call for a robe as well as a robber.

                            i'm just trying to figure out what it is to know if it's something i really need to be spending energy on finding, or if i can move on (which i'm actually doing...moving on...anyway. but still keeping it in mind).

                            i love this group.

                            thanks all for your time.

                            paula

                            "THE TIME HAS COME", THE WALRUS SAID,"TO TALK OF MANY THINGS.
                            OF SHOES, AND SHIPS AND SEALING WAX, OF CABBAGES AND KINGS.
                            AND WHY THE SEA IS BOILING HOT, AND WHETHER PIGS HAVE WINGS."


                            --- On Sat, 5/24/08, Alexadbw@... <Alexadbw@...> wrote:

                            > From: Alexadbw@... <Alexadbw@...>
                            > Subject: Re: [TheCostumersManifesto] what is a "robber"?
                            > To: TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com
                            > Date: Saturday, May 24, 2008, 4:16 PM
                            > This question intrigued me for some reason and so I began to
                            > search.
                            > Apparently a robber is simply a robe.
                            > It comes from the fact that long ago clothing was hard to
                            > come by,so when
                            > thieves overtook travelers, they almost always stole their
                            > clothing along with
                            > other valuables.( I searched with words + origins + robe +
                            > robber )
                            > Now the question is "why didn't they just say
                            > robe"? Seems like showing off
                            > to me!
                            > Alexa
                            >
                            >
                            > In a message dated 5/24/2008 11:15:29 A.M. Eastern Daylight
                            > Time,
                            > keridwyn_98@... writes:
                            >
                            > what is a "robber"?
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > **************Get trade secrets for amazing burgers. Watch
                            > "Cooking with
                            > Tyler Florence" on AOL Food.
                            > (http://food.aol.com/tyler-florence?video=4&?NCID=aolfod00030000000002)
                            >
                            >
                            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            >
                            >
                            > ------------------------------------
                            >
                            > Yahoo! Groups Links
                            >
                            > (Yahoo! ID required)
                            >
                            > mailto:TheCostumersManifesto-fullfeatured@yahoogroups.com
                            >
                          • Alexadbw@aol.com
                            I would wonder ,too, if they mean something different. I think Try to use the script itself to try to determine what is needed. A little literary license
                            Message 13 of 16 , May 24, 2008
                              I would wonder ,too, if they mean something different. I think Try to use
                              the script itself to try to determine what is needed. A little literary
                              license seems to be in order here.
                              Just had a thought...... why not rent the video(s) as see what you can
                              discover.

                              Alexa


                              In a message dated 5/24/2008 4:23:20 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
                              keridwyn_98@... writes:

                              i'm just trying to figure out what it is to know if it's something i really
                              need to be spending energy on finding,




                              **************Get trade secrets for amazing burgers. Watch "Cooking with
                              Tyler Florence" on AOL Food.
                              (http://food.aol.com/tyler-florence?video=4&?NCID=aolfod00030000000002)


                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.