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Thompson cutting system - scales?

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  • sineuve
    Hey, I am sure some of you must have tried drafting patterns with the Thompson cutting system on costumers manifesto (http://
    Message 1 of 4 , May 6, 2008
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      Hey,

      I am sure some of you must have tried drafting patterns with the
      Thompson cutting system on costumers manifesto (http://
      www.costumes.org/history/galleryimages/c1899thompsonssystem/index.htm)

      I wonder how these scales look like, that must obviously be used to
      enlarge the patterns, perhaps like scales with units "a bit shorter
      than an inch" or other units depending on the size the garment is to
      have?

      Can you perhaps compute the units if you look at your own bust
      measurement and the measurement of the pattern...?

      Did anyone succeed in making a pattern with this method?

      Thx,
      Sineuve
    • sineuve
      Anyone?
      Message 2 of 4 , Sep 21, 2011
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        Anyone?

        > Hey,
        >
        > I am sure some of you must have tried drafting patterns with the
        > Thompson cutting system on costumers manifesto (http://www.costumes.org/history/galleryimages/c1899thompsonssystem/index.htm)
        >
        > I wonder how these scales look like, that must obviously be used to
        > enlarge the patterns, perhaps like scales with units "a bit shorter
        > than an inch" or other units depending on the size the garment is to
        > have?
        >
        > Can you perhaps compute the units if you look at your own bust
        > measurement and the measurement of the pattern...?
        >
        > Did anyone succeed in making a pattern with this method?
        >
        > Thx,
        > Sineuve
        >
      • francesgrimble
        ... The Thompson System used apportioning scales. For an explanation of apportioning scales, go to www.lavoltapress.com and then to the FAQ. Each publisher
        Message 3 of 4 , Jan 11, 2012
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          --- In TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com, "sineuve" <sineuve@...> wrote:
          >
          > Anyone?
          >
          > > Hey,
          > >
          > > I am sure some of you must have tried drafting patterns with the
          > > Thompson cutting system on costumers manifesto (http://www.costumes.org/history/galleryimages/c1899thompsonssystem/index.htm)
          > >
          > > I wonder how these scales look like, that must obviously be used to
          > > enlarge the patterns, perhaps like scales with units "a bit shorter
          > > than an inch" or other units depending on the size the garment is to
          > > have?
          > >
          > > Can you perhaps compute the units if you look at your own bust
          > > measurement and the measurement of the pattern...?
          > >
          >

          The Thompson System used apportioning scales. For an explanation of apportioning scales, go to www.lavoltapress.com and then to the FAQ. Each publisher of pattern publications issued proprietary apportioning scales that worked with their own patterns. I have used apportioning scales to draft patterns, and yes they do work as a sizing method. I have published several books of patterns that use different apportioning scale systems. However, the Thompson System scales (specifically) are rare on the used market and have not been reprinted anywhere that I know of.

          Hope this helps.

          Fran
          Lavolta Press
          Books of historic clothing patterns
          www.lavoltapress.com
          www.facebook.com/LavoltaPress

          Fran
        • sineuve
          Thank you Fran! I thought so... so perhaps you CAN compute the units by comparing your bust measurement to the numbers in the pattern. You did something like
          Message 4 of 4 , Feb 20 1:23 AM
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            Thank you Fran!

            I thought so...
            so perhaps you CAN compute the units by comparing your bust measurement to the numbers in the pattern. You did something like that for your books, right?
            Then I shall try that.

            Great Thanks,

            Sineuve



            --- In TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com, "francesgrimble" <fran@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            >
            > --- In TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com, "sineuve" <sineuve@> wrote:
            > >
            > > Anyone?
            > >
            > > > Hey,
            > > >
            > > > I am sure some of you must have tried drafting patterns with the
            > > > Thompson cutting system on costumers manifesto (http://www.costumes.org/history/galleryimages/c1899thompsonssystem/index.htm)
            > > >
            > > > I wonder how these scales look like, that must obviously be used to
            > > > enlarge the patterns, perhaps like scales with units "a bit shorter
            > > > than an inch" or other units depending on the size the garment is to
            > > > have?
            > > >
            > > > Can you perhaps compute the units if you look at your own bust
            > > > measurement and the measurement of the pattern...?
            > > >
            > >
            >
            > The Thompson System used apportioning scales. For an explanation of apportioning scales, go to www.lavoltapress.com and then to the FAQ. Each publisher of pattern publications issued proprietary apportioning scales that worked with their own patterns. I have used apportioning scales to draft patterns, and yes they do work as a sizing method. I have published several books of patterns that use different apportioning scale systems. However, the Thompson System scales (specifically) are rare on the used market and have not been reprinted anywhere that I know of.
            >
            > Hope this helps.
            >
            > Fran
            > Lavolta Press
            > Books of historic clothing patterns
            > www.lavoltapress.com
            > www.facebook.com/LavoltaPress
            >
            > Fran
            >
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