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Upcoming tour with High School students, input welcome

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  • Bonnie
    I have an upcoming May-term tour with High School students from a nearby school. They re going to stay for a discussion on schooling and job opportunities for
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 21, 2008
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      I have an upcoming May-term tour with High School students from a
      nearby school. They're going to stay for a discussion on schooling and
      job opportunities for theatre in relation to makeup, hair and
      costuming.

      Being from a small town, there are limited options here, and it's very
      much an introduction to the types of things that you can do for work if
      you were interested in theatre. (Most of these kids are 14-15, and
      it's a class mostly about fashion design).

      If anyone has any basic information they want to share with me or
      advice for these students, please feel free to email me personally. I
      thought there's such a wide range of experience and specialties on this
      board that it could make for a good mix of answers. I don't want to
      spark any heated discussions, just really curious if anyone has a point
      of view different from mine that they want to share.
    • Sylvia Rognstad
      I m not sure what your point of view is or exactly what kind of information you are looking for here. Could you be a bit more specific? I teach a class in
      Message 2 of 4 , Apr 21, 2008
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        I'm not sure what your point of view is or exactly what kind of
        information you are looking for here. Could you be a bit more
        specific? I teach a class in the costume and fashion industries for a
        community college so I may be of help if I knew what you were getting
        at a little better.

        Sylvia

        On Apr 21, 2008, at 1:49 PM, Bonnie wrote:

        > I have an upcoming May-term tour with High School students from a
        > nearby school. They're going to stay for a discussion on schooling and
        > job opportunities for theatre in relation to makeup, hair and
        > costuming.
        >
        > Being from a small town, there are limited options here, and it's very
        > much an introduction to the types of things that you can do for work
        > if
        > you were interested in theatre. (Most of these kids are 14-15, and
        > it's a class mostly about fashion design).
        >
        > If anyone has any basic information they want to share with me or
        > advice for these students, please feel free to email me personally. I
        > thought there's such a wide range of experience and specialties on
        > this
        > board that it could make for a good mix of answers. I don't want to
        > spark any heated discussions, just really curious if anyone has a
        > point
        > of view different from mine that they want to share.
        >
        >
        >

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Bonnie
        Yes, I ll try to be more specific, thank you for being willing to help. I guess what I m saying is that these are small-town kids and while our area is larger,
        Message 3 of 4 , Apr 21, 2008
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          Yes, I'll try to be more specific, thank you for being willing to
          help.

          I guess what I'm saying is that these are small-town kids and while
          our area is larger, we still are a small town of only 12,000. My
          personal experience is limited to what I do (run a costume shop of
          30,000 costumes in rural midwest USA) and what I know of those that I
          work with (also usually High School directors, or mid-size Community
          Theatre contacts).

          While I have family in theatre professionally, I just don't have the
          same "bigger-city" experience they do. I know a lot of costume
          designers on this board have a perspective that these students don't
          have access to personally (not through me, anyway), and it's that
          perspective that I'm looking to bring to them from responses I might
          get here.

          Any advice from your personal perspective on education, experience,
          where to find job opportunities, how to find where your skills would
          best be used, what you love about what you do, what you hate about
          what you do, what you wish you'd done differently, what you're glad
          someone told you...that type of information.

          Thanks much-
          Bonnie


          --- In TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com, Sylvia Rognstad
          <sylvia@...> wrote:
          >
          > I'm not sure what your point of view is or exactly what kind of
          > information you are looking for here. Could you be a bit more
          > specific?
        • Curtis
          ... Well, I ll chip in from the small-town side of things. I d tell them to learn as many different types of skills as possible, if they re interested in
          Message 4 of 4 , Apr 23, 2008
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            --- In TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com, "Bonnie"
            <avgsuperheroine@...> wrote:
            >
            > I guess what I'm saying is that these are small-town kids and while
            > our area is larger, we still are a small town of only 12,000. My
            > personal experience is limited to what I do (run a costume shop of
            > 30,000 costumes in rural midwest USA) and what I know of those that I
            > work with (also usually High School directors, or mid-size Community
            > Theatre contacts).

            Well, I'll chip in from the small-town side of things. I'd tell them
            to learn as many different types of skills as possible, if they're
            interested in doing theater...you never know when someone might have
            an open position that you've actually got the skills to fill. I never
            finished my theater degree, much to the exasperation of at least one
            of my professors...he kept pushing me to choose an emphasis, but I
            enjoyed too many different aspects of theater to settle on just one.
            I ended up in my current position by default...when I interviewed,
            they decided they wanted to hire me...they just didn't know where they
            were going to use me, because I could have filled just about any
            vacant position on the list at the time. But they couldn't find a
            costumer, and they found one of everything else...so that was where
            they plugged me in.

            Since then, in addition to the costuming work I do as my 'day job', I
            have also freelanced as a makeup designer, props designer, scenic
            artist, sound-board operator, and dresser/deckhand--and costumer for
            other groups. Salt Lake is probably on the 'bigger city' list...a lot
            of theater people in this area specialize. It works well for them; but
            that puts you in a limited market.

            Besides, I love the fact that I'm never quite sure what job is coming
            my way next. I just finished painting some drops for one of the
            theaters in town. Tomorrow, I'm doing makeup on some 'streetmosphere'
            characters at a business convention. Saturday night, one of the
            performing groups I costume for has a show. If you work in a small
            town...or even if it's a big town, but a small theater, having a
            multi-faceted background makes you a great asset to the staff.

            That's my two bits...
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