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Re: [TheCostumersManifesto] I can't be the only costumer that experiences th...

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  • Katryn Richardson
    ... LOL... Actually, right now I don t get paid to do this because I got fed up and quit the whole shebang. But in the past I have been paid to do just about
    Message 1 of 3 , May 29 8:48 AM
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      vickdamom@... wrote:
      >
      > Underpaid position? You get paid to do this?
      >

      LOL... Actually, right now I don't get paid to do this because I got fed up and quit the whole
      shebang.

      But in the past I have been paid to do just about all the different positions, from doing the
      wash and set-up for a show to in-house costume construction for a major opera company right up
      to designing a (small) summer stock season. I can attest to the fact that many times, the
      unpaid positions are the happiest and most appreciated-- now, if only the credit card companies
      would start to understand that!!! :D

      Katryn

      --
      Method is more important than strength...
      By dropping golden beads near a snake, a crow once managed to have a passerby
      kill the snake for the beads. - Siddha Nagarjuna
    • Katryn Richardson
      I do agree!! I have had an equal amount of good and bad experiences no matter what the venue. In fact, the only thing I ve noticed is that many times when a
      Message 2 of 3 , Jun 2, 2002
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        I do agree!! I have had an equal amount of good and bad experiences no matter what the venue.

        In fact, the only thing I've noticed is that many times when a paid position has only a very
        meager salary, sometimes it indicates a lack of appreciation from the management, either for
        the tech positions in general, or for the costume staff. The exceptions are usually fledgling
        companies or secondary productions of a larger organization-- those usually just don't quite
        have enough money yet and so everyone is equally underpaid.



        thecostumersmanifesto wrote:
        >
        > The whole false tech vs actor "rivalry" that goes on with some folks
        > just underlines the lack of professionalism that abounds in some
        > places. REAL actors appreciate their tech support and are
        > cooperative and grateful, REAL tech people (especially costumers who
        > work most directly with actors) love and support their actors, try
        > to make them happy, and LISTEN to their concerns. The tech vs actor
        > crap invariably is a big thing with HS kids who have a tendency to
        > form into cliques of all kinds, inept community theatre people, wet
        > behind the ears college freshman, and so-called professionals who
        > never really aquired the self confidence to be unthreatened by their
        > co-artists. When you meet a costumer who scorns actors and their
        > input, or an actor who regards tech people as personal servants, you
        > know you are dealing with an insecure neurotic, or a person with no
        > real experience at all. The only proper response is to keep your
        > own attitude professional despite the stupid behavior of the few.
        > Noticing how many new college students came in from HS with this
        > attitude I once titled a talk at an ACTF conference "Why Actors Hate
        > Costumers and Vice Versa" to try to preach to the unconverted my
        > philosophy that the two groups were made to be happy with each other
        > if they could only understand the others job and communicate
        > better. I keep meaning to write that lecture down and put it on my
        > site, but I never seem to do so. Perhaps in July when I get back to
        > Alaska...
        >
        > --- In TheCostumersManifesto@y..., "neimhaille" <vcairistiona@h...>
        > wrote:
        > > > > I have quit doing comunity theater because their
        > > > > attitude is you are only on crew because you aren't
        > > > > good enough to be on stage. <----- Wow, I understand
        > > > that...I understand that very well....too well....
        > >
        > >
        > > You know what, I've had the exact opposite: you're just an actor
        > > what do you know about costuming....
        > >
        > > And the same people point blank refuse to look at the work I've
        > > done...
        > >
        > > michaela
        > > taking a break from mind numbing hand sewing net to my bodice...
        > sigh
        > > http://recital.tripod.com/costume/moulinpink.htm see what I have
        > > done so far though;)
        >
        >
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        --
        Method is more important than strength...
        By dropping golden beads near a snake, a crow once managed to have a passerby
        kill the snake for the beads. - Siddha Nagarjuna
      • neimhaille
        ... folks ... who ... try ... actor ... to ... wet ... their ... At Performing Arts school we spent the first year doing all the crew work for the second year
        Message 3 of 3 , Jun 4, 2002
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          > > The whole false tech vs actor "rivalry" that goes on with some
          folks
          > > just underlines the lack of professionalism that abounds in some
          > > places. REAL actors appreciate their tech support and are
          > > cooperative and grateful, REAL tech people (especially costumers
          who
          > > work most directly with actors) love and support their actors,
          try
          > > to make them happy, and LISTEN to their concerns. The tech vs
          actor
          > > crap invariably is a big thing with HS kids who have a tendency
          to
          > > form into cliques of all kinds, inept community theatre people,
          wet
          > > behind the ears college freshman, and so-called professionals who
          > > never really aquired the self confidence to be unthreatened by
          their
          > > co-artists.

          At Performing Arts school we spent the first year doing all the crew
          work for the second year students. So that when we became second
          year students we had an appreciation for the role of crew.

          unfortunately while our year, and the year before us really
          respevcted and *used* the time contructively our crew just hated
          every minute and we wound up doing as much if not more than them.

          It depends as much on the person as the training.. I also have done
          a lot of extra work, and the attitude of the crew and cast varied
          from person to person too. The power plays on set are something
          beyond even theatre;)

          But sometimes you can be surprised, and have all your own
          preconceptions reversed. I've been treated with respect and digity
          from some quarters I never expected to.

          Needless to say my time on set flew by when that generous atmosphere
          was promoted:)

          michaela
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