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Teaching stage makeup

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  • ~lisa.s
    I ve come up against quite a quandary, after teaching stage makeup for quite a few years...I ve got a student who is color blind--a fact I just found out, six
    Message 1 of 3 , Feb 13, 2008
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      I've come up against quite a quandary, after teaching stage makeup for
      quite a few years...I've got a student who is color blind--a fact I just
      found out, six weeks into the course. How does one go about teaching
      color theory and working with color to someone color blind? Anyone got
      any ideas?

      ~lisa.s
      --
      * llsturtsATgreatlakesDOTnet
    • Barbara
      I don t think it s possible....perhaps they have to rethink their career path....
      Message 2 of 3 , Feb 14, 2008
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        I don't think it's possible....perhaps they have to rethink their
        career path....
      • Curtis
        ... I m guessing, from the way you ve phrased the question, that this student is truly, totally color-blind? Because there are different varieties and degrees
        Message 3 of 3 , Feb 14, 2008
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          --- In TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com, "~lisa.s" <llsturts@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > I've come up against quite a quandary, after teaching stage makeup for
          > quite a few years...I've got a student who is color blind--a fact I just
          > found out, six weeks into the course. How does one go about teaching
          > color theory and working with color to someone color blind? Anyone got
          > any ideas?


          I'm guessing, from the way you've phrased the question, that this
          student is truly, totally color-blind? Because there are different
          varieties and degrees of color-blindness. I'm red-green color-blind,
          which does NOT mean that I don't see red or green, it just means that
          they don't appear as intense or vivid to me as they 'should' (I'm
          reminded of this every time a traffic light four blocks down the road
          turns yellow, and I suddenly realize it's a traffic light and not just
          another street light...when I'm looking for it, I can see that it's a
          red, green, or yellow light...it's just that it kind of fades into the
          background unless it's yellow, then it stands out). This has never
          been a problem for me in working with color, however.

          Without a clearer understanding of what, exactly, the nature of your
          student's color-blindness is, I'm quite uncertain of how to suggest
          proceeding. However, the majority of my experience with makeup has
          been more oriented to shading than color (until I got experience doing
          fantasy and glamor makeup)--you may want to focus more on shading for
          that particular student. I would imagine, even if this individual
          sees no color whatsoever, each shade still had a distinctive gray to
          it, so combining red-grays and green-grays would produce something
          that doesn't look 'normal'...?
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