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Re: Rehearsal skirt suggestions wanted

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  • geneiak
    we used to save mock ups of long skirts to be used for rehearsal skirts-
    Message 1 of 13 , Feb 12, 2008
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      we used to save mock ups of long skirts to be used for rehearsal skirts-

      --- In TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com, "catslave54"
      <zimmermanel@...> wrote:
      >
      > Any ideas on building rehearsal skirts to keep in stock,use over and
      > over, and yet fit any number of potential sizes and heights? I'm
      > waffling between gored panels with a lot of hooks and eyes on a long
      > waistband, and a straight panel with a drawstring tie. Heavy muslin?
      > Midweight? Polyester? Should I label them Small, Medium or Large,
      > Short or Tall? What say you all? Elizabeth
      >
    • m d b
      ... My multipurpose skirt (which is now...somewhere) is made of panels of gores with a drawstring waist. Best of both worlds, and you can direct the fullness
      Message 2 of 13 , Feb 14, 2008
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        > Any ideas on building rehearsal skirts to keep in stock,use over and
        > over, and yet fit any number of potential sizes and heights? I'm
        > waffling between gored panels with a lot of hooks and eyes on a long
        > waistband, and a straight panel with a drawstring tie. Heavy muslin?
        > Midweight? Polyester? Should I label them Small, Medium or Large,
        > Short or Tall? What say you all? Elizabeth


        My multipurpose skirt (which is now...somewhere) is made of panels of
        gores with a drawstring waist. Best of both worlds, and you can direct
        the fullness towards the back if you need to get an actor used to the
        feeling of a bustle type skirt. I do prefer a narrow cotton tape for
        the drawstring.

        Michaela de Bruce
        http://costumes.glittersweet.com
      • Trim Fairy
        They might want to switch to print work. There, shading is more important than color. Even a colorblind person can usually tell the difference between light
        Message 3 of 13 , Mar 14, 2008
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          They might want to switch to print work. There, shading is more important than color. Even a colorblind person can usually tell the difference between light and dark.


          ---------------------------------
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        • ~lisa.s
          lol...YOU try telling a 19 year old who thinks he s the next Olivier, and who, just yesterday, WOWed and nailed a scholarship audition allowing him to go from
          Message 4 of 13 , Mar 15, 2008
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            lol...YOU try telling a 19 year old who thinks he's the next Olivier,
            and who, just yesterday, WOWed and nailed a scholarship audition
            allowing him to go from our community college and join the undergrad
            acting company of a prestigious university...

            Actually he's doing rather well in class. We worked out which
            colors--highlights, mid-tones, shadows are "normal" for him and the
            applications he'd most likely to run into. And he starts out each
            session by asking the question "are these the right pots should I use?"
            His blending skills are probably the best out of all 15 students. We'll
            see how his animal project goes on Monday.

            Now, if I could just do something for the kid who's afraid of cotton
            balls and Q-Tips. Really! He's a big, strong guy who's been near to
            tears just working next to someone using cotton balls or pads...then
            there's the young man who's loosing his eyesight, wears Coke bottle
            glasses and has to work with his nose almost touching the mirror. To say
            it's been an interesting semester is an understatement!

            ~lisa.s



            Trim Fairy wrote:
            >
            > They might want to switch to print work. There, shading is more
            > important than color. Even a colorblind person can usually tell the
            > difference between light and dark.

            --
            ~lisa.s * llsturtsATgreatlakesDOTnet
          • Curtis
            ... A little first-aid tape on the base of the makeup pots will give him a spot where he can label each pot so he knows he s got the right
            Message 5 of 13 , Mar 15, 2008
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              --- In TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com, "~lisa.s" <llsturts@...>
              wrote:
              >
              > Actually he's doing rather well in class. We worked out which
              > colors--highlights, mid-tones, shadows are "normal" for him and the
              > applications he'd most likely to run into. And he starts out each
              > session by asking the question "are these the right pots should I use?"

              A little first-aid tape on the base of the makeup pots will give him a
              spot where he can label each pot so he knows he's got the right
              shadow/highlight/base/etc...double-checking is fine in class, but when
              he gets into a more professional environment, there may or may not be
              people who will be willing to coach him on his color selections. In
              my experience (in this region, at least), actors take care of their
              own makeup unless there is some kind of specialty makeup needed...then
              the theater may or may not provide a makeup artist, depending on what
              skills they have available with their existing personnel. So (in
              practical terms), he should really only need a good grasp on the basics.

              > Now, if I could just do something for the kid who's afraid of cotton
              > balls and Q-Tips. Really! He's a big, strong guy who's been near to
              > tears just working next to someone using cotton balls or pads...then
              > there's the young man who's loosing his eyesight, wears Coke bottle
              > glasses and has to work with his nose almost touching the mirror. To say
              > it's been an interesting semester is an understatement!

              Sorry, when it comes to cotton-phobia, I've got nothing...that's a
              totally new one for me. I've worked with people that didn't like
              cotton, but never anyone that feared it.
            • Cat Devereaux
              ... glasses and has to work with his nose almost touching the mirror. I can speak to that one... given I ve had that problem since 2nd grade. Instead of
              Message 6 of 13 , Mar 15, 2008
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                >> there's the young man who's loosing his eyesight, wears Coke bottle
                glasses and has to work with his nose almost touching the mirror.

                I can speak to that one... given I've had that problem since 2nd grade.

                Instead of staining to reach the mirror, he needs one of those circular
                mirrors that's magnified on one side and standard on the other. Apply
                all eye makeup and details with nose practically touching the magnified
                side. Teach him to tilt it to take advantage of the best light
                (different for each eye when you're that close). For blending check,
                it's too hard to see enough of your face in the magnified side. Flip it
                to regular and back off another inch or two. Even though it's blurry,
                blending is about shadows and highlights working together. I blend in
                the blur farther back and then check final to make sure no details
                around the eyes are messed up.

                Anyway... my two cents with sights at 750+ on each eye.

                -Cat-
              • llsturts@greatlakes.net
                Oh, yeah, Cat. Because of the College being a State funded institution and ADA, we were able to a real nifty lighted/magnified mirror. Plus he sits in front of
                Message 7 of 13 , Mar 15, 2008
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                  Oh, yeah, Cat. Because of the College being a State funded institution and
                  ADA, we were able to a real nifty lighted/magnified mirror. Plus he sits
                  in front of a full length mirror too, and is able to swivel around on a
                  stool to make use of what ever mirror works best that day. I allow a
                  friend who sits next to him to help out more than I might another student.

                  I had another strange occurrence with the class too--

                  I have a friend, who does Civil War Reenacting as a medic come in and give
                  the wounds and bruises lecture. Then the next class period the students
                  practice the techniques. One of the students, a "non traditional" (read:
                  older) I could tell that she was not real comfortable with what was going
                  on during the demo lecture, but seemed okay. Then, about 20 minutes into
                  the next class, when some of the kids were doing quite horrific makeup (I
                  told them there was no extra points for grossing out the instructor!) she
                  came up to me and quietly said she wasn't feeling well. So, I let her go
                  early. I got a feeling, which was later confirmed, that at one time she's
                  been battered.

                  As I said, it's been an interesting semester...

                  ~lisa.s

                  >> there's the young man who's loosing his eyesight, wears Coke bottle
                  >> glasses and has to work with his nose almost touching the mirror.
                  >
                  > I can speak to that one... given I've had that problem since 2nd grade.
                  >
                  > Instead of staining to reach the mirror, he needs one of those circular
                  > mirrors that's magnified on one side and standard on the other. Apply
                  > all eye makeup and details with nose practically touching the magnified
                  > side. Teach him to tilt it to take advantage of the best light
                  > (different for each eye when you're that close). For blending check,
                  > it's too hard to see enough of your face in the magnified side. Flip it
                  > to regular and back off another inch or two. Even though it's blurry,
                  > blending is about shadows and highlights working together. I blend in
                  > the blur farther back and then check final to make sure no details
                  > around the eyes are messed up.
                  >
                  > Anyway... my two cents with sights at 750+ on each eye.
                • llsturts@greatlakes.net
                  Like Grrr Animals kids clothes, from back in the day. That s a very good idea, Curtis. ~lisa.s
                  Message 8 of 13 , Mar 15, 2008
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                    Like Grrr Animals kids clothes, from back in the day. That's a very good
                    idea, Curtis.

                    ~lisa.s


                    >> Actually he's doing rather well in class. We worked out which
                    >> colors--highlights, mid-tones, shadows are "normal" for him and the
                    >> applications he'd most likely to run into. And he starts out each
                    >> session by asking the question "are these the right pots should I use?"
                    >
                    > A little first-aid tape on the base of the makeup pots will give him a
                    > spot where he can label each pot so he knows he's got the right
                    > shadow/highlight/base/etc...
                  • Curtis
                    ... Actually, if your visions a little blurry and you re close to the mirror, you re probably seeing things about the same way your average audience member
                    Message 9 of 13 , Mar 16, 2008
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                      --- In TheCostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com, Cat Devereaux
                      <CatDevereaux@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > to regular and back off another inch or two. Even though it's blurry,
                      > blending is about shadows and highlights working together. I blend in
                      > the blur farther back and then check final to make sure no details
                      > around the eyes are messed up.

                      Actually, if your visions a little blurry and you're close to the
                      mirror, you're probably seeing things about the same way your average
                      audience member would from about halfway (or further) back in a
                      'standard' theater. I just finished a production of Will Rogers
                      Follies that took us three rehearsals to get Clem's age makeup dialed
                      in...the first night, it looked fantastic from right up close...but I
                      was watching rehearsal from a third of the way back in the house and
                      couldn't see anything. So we went darker and bolder...and then darker
                      and bolder again before we finally had it right.

                      I tell kids, when I do makeup demonstrations, that they have to
                      realize their audience isn't going to see the makeup from up close,
                      like they (the kids) are...if they want an idea of what the audience
                      is going to see, they need to stand on the far side of a large room
                      and look at themselves in the mirror...*laugh*
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