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10621Re: [TheCostumersManifesto] costumes and lighting

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  • Bo Persson
    Sep 16, 2008
      Light and fabric/costume can be tricky. I am dress historian and
      photographer. I take photos at fashion shows, reenactment events and
      museums. Thank godness it is not film but digital.

      Bo

      Bo Persson, M.A.
      Independent Dress Consultant & Researcher & Photographer
      bo_persson@...
      Skype name: bossep64
      http://bopersson64.wordpress.com/
      http://culturedevelopmentandresearch-cedar.freehomepage.com/
      http://www.flickr.com/photos/76021273@N00/
      http://www.cig.canon-europe.com/a?i=0sgcbH0TLC


      16 sep 2008 kl. 15.35 skrev Sylvia Rognstad:

      > Live and learn. I thought I had been in the business long enough to
      > not have to consider this, but I realized I had been doing straight
      > theatre without any special lighting for many years and had just
      > forgotten about difficult interactions between gels and costumes. The
      > director wants a warm look for one act of the show and that requires
      > red and orange gels. Needless to say, I will be in contact with the
      > lighting designer early on from now on!
      >
      > Sylvia
      >
      > On Sep 16, 2008, at 8:09 AM, Cheryl McCarron wrote:
      >
      > > Hi Sylvia,
      > > In an ideal world, there should be compromise on both sides. I once
      > > picked an irridescent chiffon for a veil that looked like mud
      > onstage.
      > > I blamed myself for a poor fabric choice, but my lighting designer
      > > immediately said, "No problem, I can make that look better." He said
      > > he could easily change a gel to a slightly different shade which
      > would
      > > make the costume look better, but still keep his original intention
      > > with the lights. (I love working with that lighting designer!).
      > >
      > > Honestly, I have never had a lighting designer tell me flat out that
      > > my choices just won't work and I have to change them. I have had
      > > them tell me that things might be difficult and we have worked out a
      > > comprise where sometimes I have made a change and sometimes they
      > > have. I think your lighting designer went about it poorly in
      > assuming
      > > that her choices were more important than yours and therefore yours
      > > would just have to change.
      > >
      > > At least you don't have to rebuild anything. As others have
      > > mentioned, meetings with the full design team and the director early
      > > on can usually help head off stuff like this. In the absence of
      > that
      > > meeting, I usually send a swatch package or a scan of the fabrics to
      > > the lighting designer before I start my build.
      > >
      > > Best of luck with the show,
      > > Cheryl McCarron
      > > NYC Fabric Finder
      > >
      > > --- On Fri, 9/12/08, Sylvia Rognstad <sylvia@...> wrote:
      > >
      > > From: Sylvia Rognstad <sylvia@...>
      > > Subject: [TheCostumersManifesto] costumes and lighting
      > > To: thecostumersManifesto@yahoogroups.com
      > > Date: Friday, September 12, 2008, 10:16 AM
      > >
      > > I had a very unfortunate experience last night with the lighting
      > > designer on the rock opera I'm costuming and would like some input
      > > from
      > > other costumers who are perhaps more knowledgeable than I on
      > lights. I
      > > admit it's always been my weak spot. My designs have been finalized
      > > for weeks, fabrics purchased and work underway. Last night was the
      > > first run through so both I and the lighting designer were there.
      > She
      > > took a look at my swatches and said a lot of them wouldn't work,
      > > specifically the rusts, coppers and yellow greens, of which there
      > are
      > > quite a few. Now I have to buy all new fabric for several costumes.
      > >
      > > Obviously my question is--why can't she change her gels to make them
      > > work? Are these just colors that shouldn't be put on stage ever or
      > > what? I don't get it. Can someone enlighten me--no pun intended? In
      > > retrospect of course we should have had a meeting several weeks ago
      > > but
      > > I think both I and the director assumed she would be working with
      > what
      > > I had designed but she seems to be making it sounds like those
      > colors
      > > just won't work at all, period for anything at any time.
      > >
      > > Sylvia R
      > >
      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >







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