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Re: [The Baroness] Re: Baroness #9.5 or #13?

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  • Jason Inkatha
    The villain laments the fact that he is conjoined twins from the waist down because he would have really liked being referred to as that two-headed guy.  
    Message 1 of 6 , Dec 2, 2012
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      The villain laments the fact that he is conjoined twins from the waist down because he would have really liked being referred to as "that two-headed guy."  Frustrated, he declares war on society!
       
      Or at least he would in my version....:P tongue
       
      K

      From: haldeman2068 <haldeman2068@...>
      To: TheBaroness@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Sunday, December 2, 2012 3:33 PM
      Subject: [The Baroness] Re: Baroness #9.5 or #13?
       

      After reading the last post and letter from Donald Moffitt it would have been interesting to read the original "Death Is A Copycat" as well as the other two unpublished Baroness novels. Having the Baroness deal not only with the situation with the three-legged villian named Triskelion(who was named in a previous post a few years ago when the discovery of the three unpublished novels were brought to everyone's attention)but also the other plots in the story especially how she was captured and how she escaped and dealt with Triskelion and anyone else who tried to kill her while she was completing her mission....and who became her lover/ally(or possible enemy). Since we may never see the three unpublished novels see print(I am confident that someone out there will find a way to bring them to print somehow someday....a Baroness fan who knows the rest of us would look forward to such an event). Until then we can only use our imagination based on what little we know about "Death Is A Copycat" and the other two unpublished novels.

      --- In mailto:TheBaroness%40yahoogroups.com, "ppsantos" <ppsantos@...> wrote:
      >
      > Is Photo-phobie (Penny #9), the published French translation of the unpublished "Death Is A Copy Cat" (supposedly Baroness #9) just an altered version of DIAC (something like, Baroness #9.5)? Or could Photo-phobie be considered as a new Baroness title? Sort of, Baroness #13? Photo-phobie's copyright page says that the original title was "Death Is A Copy Cat", translated by Iawa Tate in 1976. But Donald Moffitt(writer of all the original published english Baroness titles) shared his different opinion.
      >
      > Below is what he said in his letter to me:
      >
      > ---------------------------------
      >
      > October 1, 2012
      >
      > Dear Pauli,
      >
      > It was a pleasure to hear from you, and a mixed pleasure to see the fruits of your Herculean labors on the translation.
      >
      > But I'm afraid I have what will probably come as bad news for you. The chapters you sent me seem to have nothing to do with the "Death Is a Copycat" novel that I wrote. It looks to me as if the French publisher hired somebody to write a French version, the fellow leafed through it for a few minutes without bothering to read it, and proceeded to write a new book with a different plot and characters according to what he or she imagined the Baroness to be about. I even recognized some cribs from Ian Fleming.
      >
      > There are only two points of similarity with "Death Is a Copycat," both of them extremely tenuous. I seem to remember that there was a character named "Pollux" who had something to do with duplicating machines (he was going to flood the world with counterfeit money and destroy the world economy), and there was a scene involving a vineyard, though the events that transpired there were entirely different, involving a different plot.
      >
      > But there was no Hughes, Duke of Chataigne, no duel of Ferrari and Buggati, nothing about the American embassy or the murder of someone named Eldridge. Instead the story was about Penelope's efforts to track down a bizarre 3-legged villain (conjoined twins from the waist down). Her adventures finally bring her to an obscure French village and the dusty old birth records. The old midwife is still alive, and she had an unusual hobby (her name is Mme le Ciseaux for obvious reasons); she kept the umbilical cords of every baby she delivered and preserved them in a bottle. The villain's bottle contains two dried umbilical cords, and she has her man. He masquerades as a wheelchair-bound invalid with a blanket over his lap. As a failed twin he has an understandable obsession about duplicating, which is where the copy machines come in.
      >
      > The plot evidently made no sense to the French writer, so he invented one of his own, attempting to imitate the James Bond books. But the resulting book is in no way a translation of "Death Is a Copycat," but is a new book, and a very Gallic one at that, written for French readers.
      >
      > Sorry to rain on your very ambitious parade.
      >
      > All the best,
      > Don
      >

    • haldeman2068
      Interesting interpretation of the villianIin your version) but as Donald Moffitt had described him pretending to be an invalid that would probably have taken
      Message 2 of 6 , Dec 2, 2012
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        Interesting interpretation of the villianIin your version) but as Donald Moffitt had described him pretending to be an invalid that would probably have taken Penelope by surprise when she first encountered him or having to confront him she may have been caught off guard when dealing with the conjoined twins and captured after making love to her lover(you know at this point she has already had passionate sex with the man she meets and becomes involved with in the novel before having to deal with the villain). How she is captured and bound to whatever device to torture her and kill her is a matter of conjecture(only the exposure of her beautiful body is a certainty).
        --- In TheBaroness@yahoogroups.com, Jason Inkatha <knobarius@...> wrote:
        >
        > The villain laments the fact that he is conjoined twins from the waist down because he would have really liked being referred to as "that two-headed guy."  Frustrated, he declares war on society!
        >  
        > Or at least he would in my version....
        >  
        > K
        >
        >
        > ________________________________
        > From: haldeman2068 <haldeman2068@...>
        > To: TheBaroness@yahoogroups.com
        > Sent: Sunday, December 2, 2012 3:33 PM
        > Subject: [The Baroness] Re: Baroness #9.5 or #13?
        >
        >  
        >
        > After reading the last post and letter from Donald Moffitt it would have been interesting to read the original "Death Is A Copycat" as well as the other two unpublished Baroness novels. Having the Baroness deal not only with the situation with the three-legged villian named Triskelion(who was named in a previous post a few years ago when the discovery of the three unpublished novels were brought to everyone's attention)but also the other plots in the story especially how she was captured and how she escaped and dealt with Triskelion and anyone else who tried to kill her while she was completing her mission....and who became her lover/ally(or possible enemy). Since we may never see the three unpublished novels see print(I am confident that someone out there will find a way to bring them to print somehow someday....a Baroness fan who knows the rest of us would look forward to such an event). Until then we can only use our imagination based on what little
        > we know about "Death Is A Copycat" and the other two unpublished novels.
        >
        > --- In mailto:TheBaroness%40yahoogroups.com, "ppsantos" <ppsantos@> wrote:
        > >
        > > Is Photo-phobie (Penny #9), the published French translation of the unpublished "Death Is A Copy Cat" (supposedly Baroness #9) just an altered version of DIAC (something like, Baroness #9.5)? Or could Photo-phobie be considered as a new Baroness title? Sort of, Baroness #13? Photo-phobie's copyright page says that the original title was "Death Is A Copy Cat", translated by Iawa Tate in 1976. But Donald Moffitt(writer of all the original published english Baroness titles) shared his different opinion.
        > >
        > > Below is what he said in his letter to me:
        > >
        > > ---------------------------------
        > >
        > > October 1, 2012
        > >
        > > Dear Pauli,
        > >
        > > It was a pleasure to hear from you, and a mixed pleasure to see the fruits of your Herculean labors on the translation.
        > >
        > > But I'm afraid I have what will probably come as bad news for you. The chapters you sent me seem to have nothing to do with the "Death Is a Copycat" novel that I wrote. It looks to me as if the French publisher hired somebody to write a French version, the fellow leafed through it for a few minutes without bothering to read it, and proceeded to write a new book with a different plot and characters according to what he or she imagined the Baroness to be about. I even recognized some cribs from Ian Fleming.
        > >
        > > There are only two points of similarity with "Death Is a Copycat," both of them extremely tenuous. I seem to remember that there was a character named "Pollux" who had something to do with duplicating machines (he was going to flood the world with counterfeit money and destroy the world economy), and there was a scene involving a vineyard, though the events that transpired there were entirely different, involving a different plot.
        > >
        > > But there was no Hughes, Duke of Chataigne, no duel of Ferrari and Buggati, nothing about the American embassy or the murder of someone named Eldridge. Instead the story was about Penelope's efforts to track down a bizarre 3-legged villain (conjoined twins from the waist down). Her adventures finally bring her to an obscure French village and the dusty old birth records. The old midwife is still alive, and she had an unusual hobby (her name is Mme le Ciseaux for obvious reasons); she kept the umbilical cords of every baby she delivered and preserved them in a bottle. The villain's bottle contains two dried umbilical cords, and she has her man. He masquerades as a wheelchair-bound invalid with a blanket over his lap. As a failed twin he has an understandable obsession about duplicating, which is where the copy machines come in.
        > >
        > > The plot evidently made no sense to the French writer, so he invented one of his own, attempting to imitate the James Bond books. But the resulting book is in no way a translation of "Death Is a Copycat," but is a new book, and a very Gallic one at that, written for French readers.
        > >
        > > Sorry to rain on your very ambitious parade.
        > >
        > > All the best,
        > > Don
        > >
        >
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