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Rek Hill, Fayette County, Texas

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  • danbea@cvtv.net
    FAYETTE COUNTY, TEXAS HERITAGE, VOLUME I, published in 1996, gives information about Rek Hill, Texas and I quote as follows: The small community of Rek Hill is
    Message 1 of 2 , Feb 28, 2001
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      FAYETTE COUNTY, TEXAS HERITAGE, VOLUME I, published in 1996, gives
      information about Rek Hill, Texas and I quote as follows:

      The small community of Rek Hill is located three miles east of
      Fayetteville on Highway 159. It was settled in 1883 when Ignac Rek and
      Jerry Roland purchased 50 acres of land which today is known as the Joe
      Sladek Dairy.

      Ignac Rek, his sons, Ignac, Frank, John and Joe, and a daughter, Mary,
      moved in and cleared the timberland.

      During these years meat was plentiful in the area. There were deer,
      wild turkeys, wild hogs, squirrels, rabbits, and plenty of fish in the
      Cummins Creek.

      The people started moving in and built their homes on higher ground
      while the bottom land near the Cummins Creek was used for farming. Some
      of the first settlers were Knebliks, Orsaks, Kovars, Bacas, Zapalacs,
      Konvickas, and two German families, the Frank Kurtz and Louis Mueller
      families.

      In 1895, the settlers gathered and built a school known as the Slovan-
      Bordovice School. John J. Kovar, Sr. and JohnKneblick gave three acres
      of land for the school. The school was located where the homes of Mrs.
      Robert J. Kovar, Sr. and Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. Kovar, Jr., and son now
      stand or in the vicinty.

      Pete Kneblik built a store in 1892. The only mark left of this store is
      the concrete cistern at Rek Hill at the Joe Sladek Dairy.

      In 1895, a cotton gin was built by Louis Mueller. In later years it was
      bought by John P. Kovar and later by E. V. Kovar, both of Fayetteville.
      E. V. Kovar later demolished it.

      In 1908, John Rek built a blacksmith shop and also help Ignac Rek build
      the grocery store. In later years it was purchased by Mr. and Mrs.
      Ernest Watson. Watson demolished the blacksmith shop and he and his
      wife operated the store. The late Mrs. Watson was the daughter of John
      Rek.

      The settlement to many is known as Bordovice because most of the
      settlers came from the old country area of Bordovice, Moravia.

      Note: This story was submitted for publication in this history book by
      Mrs. Lewis Bertling and she states it was taken from an article written
      by Mrs. Lewis Bertling in the New Ulm Enterprise several years ago and
      printed in "A Short History of Fayetteville, Texas and Surrounding
      Communities".


      And taken from the same book, the history of Roznov, Also called
      Halamicek, states and I quote: The gin was owned by George Weikel, and
      the blacksmith shop by John Rek. (Note this refers to the time period
      about 1885.)


      Then when I read in FAYETTE COUNTY: PAST & PRESENT about Baca's Musical
      History written by Marianna Wallace the first two paragraphs of that
      story read as follows and I quote:

      Czechoslovakia, the origin of the Baca family, is filled with lovers of
      music, both Bohemian and Moravian folktunes and dance music. The Baca
      name has been connected with music since the "Baca Beat" began in
      Czechoslovakia.

      In 1860, the Bacas set sail for the land of the free rather than having
      to pledge allegiance to the Austrian Emperor. Joseph Baca and his
      family landed in Galveston, moved up-state and settled near
      Fayetteville. Later the area became known as Bordovice, after their
      home town.
    • Lois Petter Pereira
      Bea thanks for the info. I love stuff like this plus it mentions the ancestors names. If you get time can you also look up another one. I have seen Pisek and
      Message 2 of 2 , Mar 1, 2001
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        Bea thanks for the info. I love stuff like this plus it mentions the
        ancestors names. If you get time can you also look up another one. I
        have seen Pisek and the Pisek community when I was doing the obits and I
        am curious about it. Where is it? lois

        danbea@... wrote:

        > FAYETTE COUNTY, TEXAS HERITAGE, VOLUME I, published in 1996, gives
        > information about Rek Hill, Texas and I quote as follows:
        >
        > The small community of Rek Hill is located three miles east of
        > Fayetteville on Highway 159. It was settled in 1883 when Ignac Rek
        > and
        > Jerry Roland purchased 50 acres of land which today is known as the
        > Joe
        > Sladek Dairy.
        >
        > Ignac Rek, his sons, Ignac, Frank, John and Joe, and a daughter, Mary,
        >
        > moved in and cleared the timberland.
        >
        > During these years meat was plentiful in the area. There were deer,
        > wild turkeys, wild hogs, squirrels, rabbits, and plenty of fish in the
        >
        > Cummins Creek.
        >
        > The people started moving in and built their homes on higher ground
        > while the bottom land near the Cummins Creek was used for farming.
        > Some
        > of the first settlers were Knebliks, Orsaks, Kovars, Bacas, Zapalacs,
        > Konvickas, and two German families, the Frank Kurtz and Louis Mueller
        > families.
        >
        > In 1895, the settlers gathered and built a school known as the Slovan-
        >
        > Bordovice School. John J. Kovar, Sr. and JohnKneblick gave three
        > acres
        > of land for the school. The school was located where the homes of
        > Mrs.
        > Robert J. Kovar, Sr. and Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. Kovar, Jr., and son
        > now
        > stand or in the vicinty.
        >
        > Pete Kneblik built a store in 1892. The only mark left of this store
        > is
        > the concrete cistern at Rek Hill at the Joe Sladek Dairy.
        >
        > In 1895, a cotton gin was built by Louis Mueller. In later years it
        > was
        > bought by John P. Kovar and later by E. V. Kovar, both of
        > Fayetteville.
        > E. V. Kovar later demolished it.
        >
        > In 1908, John Rek built a blacksmith shop and also help Ignac Rek
        > build
        > the grocery store. In later years it was purchased by Mr. and Mrs.
        > Ernest Watson. Watson demolished the blacksmith shop and he and his
        > wife operated the store. The late Mrs. Watson was the daughter of
        > John
        > Rek.
        >
        > The settlement to many is known as Bordovice because most of the
        > settlers came from the old country area of Bordovice, Moravia.
        >
        > Note: This story was submitted for publication in this history book
        > by
        > Mrs. Lewis Bertling and she states it was taken from an article
        > written
        > by Mrs. Lewis Bertling in the New Ulm Enterprise several years ago and
        >
        > printed in "A Short History of Fayetteville, Texas and Surrounding
        > Communities".
        >
        >
        > And taken from the same book, the history of Roznov, Also called
        > Halamicek, states and I quote: The gin was owned by George Weikel,
        > and
        > the blacksmith shop by John Rek. (Note this refers to the time
        > period
        > about 1885.)
        >
        >
        > Then when I read in FAYETTE COUNTY: PAST & PRESENT about Baca's
        > Musical
        > History written by Marianna Wallace the first two paragraphs of that
        > story read as follows and I quote:
        >
        > Czechoslovakia, the origin of the Baca family, is filled with lovers
        > of
        > music, both Bohemian and Moravian folktunes and dance music. The Baca
        >
        > name has been connected with music since the "Baca Beat" began in
        > Czechoslovakia.
        >
        > In 1860, the Bacas set sail for the land of the free rather than
        > having
        > to pledge allegiance to the Austrian Emperor. Joseph Baca and his
        > family landed in Galveston, moved up-state and settled near
        > Fayetteville. Later the area became known as Bordovice, after their
        > home town.
        >
        >
        >
        >
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        --
        Lois Petter Pereira
        Researching Ahlhorn, Bokemeyer, Brdusik, Bruntrig, Cordes, Filges,
        Francis, Garney, Gebauer, Hadac, Hadash, Halla, Hauser, Hoelschel,
        Kaskie, Maciejewski, Manak, Nauger, Ollre, Orsag, Orsak, Otjen, Papiz,
        Pavlik, Pereira, Petter, Polasek, Pratka, Psencik, Rada, Rohan,
        Sablatura, Schaub, Schroeder, Slovack, Susil, Tiemann, Urban, Weiser.
        Home Page: http://ourczech.homestead.com/
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