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The end of feudalism

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  • vmichna
    A fief was granted to my gr-gr grandmother s ancestoral village in 1272. Feudalism ended in the 1600s. My ancestor, Adam, moved there in 1630 and bought a
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 1, 2011
      A fief was granted to my gr-gr grandmother's ancestoral village in 1272. Feudalism ended in the 1600s. My ancestor, Adam, moved there in 1630 and "bought" a farm.

      A source I found says that feudal customs and rights remained enshrined in the laws of many regions including Austria and Germany until abolished by the French Revolution or the reforms of Napolean. So did my family own land in the sense that we own land today? I need someone who understands this chapter in European history more than I do to clarify.

      Thanks,

      Valorie Michna
      Researching Michna, Sasin, Holain, and Pitlik
    • dofrco@embarqmail.com
      Valorie, I doubt that I have any more understanding of European history than you do, but I’ll try to contribute my understanding. When you said that
      Message 2 of 2 , Sep 3, 2011

        Valorie,

        I doubt that I have any more understanding of European history than you do, but I’ll try to contribute my understanding. When you said that feudalism ended in the 1600’s, it threw me a curve.  So, I dug through my records to see what they said (which is feat in itself J ).  After reading them, I think that your ancestors didn’t actually “own” their property until at least 1848.

        Below are 2 sources.  Number 1 is from a researcher that I hired. Number 2 is from a website which addresses your question.

        Hope this helps,

        Doris Barton Coats

         

        1.    During the serfdom and even to the end of the 19th century the rural population in middle Europe

        was stratified in several categories. The country was divided into basic economic units, called lán

        (Engl. virgate, yardland). The lán represented so much agricultural soil that can offer a sufficient

        living for a medium family. According to the soil fertility it represented 10 – 20 hectares (25 – 50

        acres). The man working on the lán in the conditions of serfdom was rolník or láník, Germ. Bauer

        or Lahner (Eng. peasant). Only from 1848, when the serfdom was canceled and the peasants started

        to be real owners of their land we can talk about sedlák “farmers”…

         

        2.    In the 19th century, peasants faced a hard and oppressed life. The Czech (Bohemian), Moravian and Slovak lands were ruled as part of the Habsburg dominions. This foreign rule over the once independent Bohemian kingdom was long resented and opposed by its inhabitants. In a period of European enlightment, the habsburg emperors kept their peasants vertiually in slavery and poverty, without political or religious freedom.

        In 1848, revolutions broke out throughout the declining Habsburg empire against their feudal and conservative rule. Some of the Czech protestors had the dream to restore an independent democratic Czech state, although most would have been happy with some form of self-rule and larger freedom.

        Although suppressed quickly, it forced the Habsburg rulers to allow thier subjects greater freedom. The most important change was abolishing serfdom. Until that time, the aristocratic families controlled all aspects of the village live. Marriage outside the parish or moving to a different village could only be done with special permit of the feudal nobility. Although the peasants had the possibility to appoint an heir who would inherit the farm, this only concerned the right to live and work there, the actual premises were property of the manor. The peasant had to work for free regularly for the manor,a duty called robota (from which originated the word robot!).

        This all changed after 1848. The forced payments to manor, church, and school were abolished and the peasants could freely resettle or move. They also could buy the farm premises from the manor, who exerted this final payment from the now free farmers.

        http://www.rozmberk.org/?act=20

         

         

        From: TexasCzechs@yahoogroups.com [mailto:TexasCzechs@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of vmichna
        Sent: Thursday, September 01, 2011 3:29 PM
        To: TexasCzechs@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [TexasCzechs] The end of feudalism

         

         

        A fief was granted to my gr-gr grandmother's ancestoral village in 1272. Feudalism ended in the 1600s. My ancestor, Adam, moved there in 1630 and "bought" a farm.

        A source I found says that feudal customs and rights remained enshrined in the laws of many regions including Austria and Germany until abolished by the French Revolution or the reforms of Napolean. So did my family own land in the sense that we own land today? I need someone who understands this chapter in European history more than I do to clarify.

        Thanks,

        Valorie Michna
        Researching Michna, Sasin, Holain, and Pitlik

        .

        http://geo.yahoo.com/serv?s=97359714/grpId=487651/grpspId=1706337062/msgId=58822/stime=1314908965/nc1=3848621/nc2=5741395/nc3=4025304

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